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Rollins Foundations in the Liberal Arts

Fall 2022/Spring 2023 RFLA Seminar Courses

The following seminar courses will be offered in the RFLA curriculum for the fall 2022 / spring 2023 semesters.  In order to satisfy your RFLA requirements you must take:

  • 1 Rollins Conference Course
  • 4 competencies courses (one course in each of these four areas: foreign language, mathematical thinking, writing, and ethical reasoning)
  • 5 Foundations seminars that fall under the five themes: Cultural Collision, Enduring Questions, Environment, Identity, Innovation.
    • At least one course in Expressive Arts(A), Social Sciences(C), Humanities(H), and Sciences(S).
    • One(1) 100-level course, three(3) 200-level courses, one(1) 300-level course.

Please be sure to check the divisional exceptions list for courses that may count towards rFLA credit.

Please be sure to check the interdisciplinary course list for courses that could satisfy interdisciplinary majors.

Fall 2022/ Spring 2023 RFLA Course Offerings

Course: RFLA  100A 1          
Instructor:  Rachel Simmons                         
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Visual Journals

Prereq: RFLA 100, $50 course fee

Course Description: This course will examine identity and memory through the visual journal, a mixed media fusion of creative writing and art. Journaling is a practice of self-reflection that helps create meaning in our lives. Students will engage in timed writing activities, group critiques and mixed media techniques. Weekly written and visual reflections focus on memory, identity, aspirations and perceived obstacles to success. Fee $50.

Course: RFLA  100C 1                    
Instructor:  Anca Voicu                   
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Quo Vadis, Europe

Prereq: Cultural Collision

Course Description: This course covers the European countries’ economic development after WWII to the present day. In doing so it presents an economic framework for understanding the historical past and the change following the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989. Focus will be placed on the interconnectedness among various European economies situated in the Eastern and Western parts of the European continent, as well as their interactions with and within the international economy. While the emphasis of this course is on economic development, we will also look at the European saga through a historical and a cultural lense. The analysis targets three broad eras: the quarter century from 1945 to 1973 , a period of rapid transformation associated with the golden age of economic growth, the interval between 1973 to1989, which is associated with economic slowdown, and the stage between 1989 to the present day featuring the transition stages of the Central East European countries in the 1990s, the expansion of the European Union over the past two decades and a half and the birth of a new Europe.

Course: RFLA  200A 1                   
Instructor:  MacKenzie Ryan           
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Art for Rollins

Prereq: RFLA 100; Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description: Art is all around at Rollins, but have you ever considered these visual artworks closely? We live in close proximity to artworks at the Rollins Museum of Art, The Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art at the Alfond Inn, and others owned and on display around campus. In this course, we will focus on visual art at Rollins to explore the cultural dynamics of collecting, the ethics of purchasing, acquiring, owning, contextualizing, and issues involved in displaying artwork on campus. We will consider how differing cultures inform artworks collected and displayed, and how artworks can inherit different meanings depending on time, place, and audience. We will critically examine artworks themselves as well as their place at Rollins College. This course considers differing cultures involved in the visual arts at Rollins—collectors who may be donors and alumni, viewers who may be current students of a younger generation, and faculty and staff who work to serve both populations through the care and display of artwork at Rollins. We will also consider changing cultural norms associated with the ethics of purchasing, acquiring, owning, contextualizing, and displaying visual art at Rollins.

Course: RFLA  200A 2                   
Instructor:  Dana Hargrove        
Days/Times: R, 4:00 - 6:30
Course Title:  Drawing and Composition

Prereq: RFLA 100; Theme: Innovation; Holt: Satisfies ART 120; Counts as ART 221; Fee: $50

Course Description: This studio class will strongly establish a beginning point from which you will develop and refine your understanding of drawing as a creative visual inquiry into mark making and drawing. You will learn how to translate and interpret three-dimensional forms onto two-dimensional surface with a variety of drawing materials both traditional and contemporary while also learning how to communicate visually.

Course: RFLA  200A 3                   
Instructor:  Audrey Hope             
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Introduction to Sculpture

Prereq: 100 RLFA, $50 course fee

Course Description: This studio course introduces the fundamentals of contemporary sculptural practice with an emphasis on spatial awareness, problem-solving, and conceptual development. Students will investigate sculptural form as a means of cultural production through technical exercises, hands-on studio projects, critiques, slide lectures, readings, and discussions. The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials and strategies for making sculpture. Students will develop their technical, formal and conceptual knowledge of art making, while beginning to identify the vocabularies and concerns that inform their own work. Students will expand their technical and problem-solving skills both through general demonstrations and exercises and in response to unique problems arising from their own projects. Fee $50.

Course: RFLA  200A 4                    
Instructor:  Chuck Archard           
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  One Hit Wonders

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collisions

Course Description - Why do some artists or bands have a long career and others are merely “One Hit Wonders”? Is Pop music designed to be disposable and ephemeral? This course will examine the unpredictability of the music industry and unravel many of the factors that influenced the creation of Pop hits and Popular music from the 1970s to the present. Many of the factors explored in class will include talent versus looks, digital recording, the corporatization of record labels, sampling, global communication, streaming, social media and behavioral targeting, as well as the overall zeitgeist and historical context of each era. We will also delve into the formulaic songwriting techniques used to create the perfect three-minute “Ear Candy” pop masterpiece.

Course: RFLA  200A 5                    
Instructor:  Caitlin Mohr                 
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Women in Music

Prereq: 100-level RFLA; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision

Course Description: This course will survey the contributions of women performers, composers, conductors, and patrons in the world of music, both Western and "non-western." Students can expect to be listening and thinking critically about music from a variety of genres, time periods, and perspectives ranging from Hildegard von Bingen’s medieval liturgical roots to Ella Fitzgerald’s American Popular Music. The overall approach will be topical rather than chronological, allowing for a comparative study of different musical styles, surrounding cultural and historical issues related to gender. The course will examine assumptions made about music and musicians in culture, and call into question the control of the music that is preserved, distributed, and held in high regard.

 

Course: RFLA  200A 6                    
Instructor:  Dan Flick       
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50
Course Title:  Music Meets Life

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: With music and creativity at their core, this course will focus on the countless ways that music touches our daily lives and will celebrate how music can both define us as individuals and bring us together as one world. At no time in history have artists had such a broad reach to influence change and help shape our future. So, whether your interests tend toward being the creator, promoter, producer, performer, or consumer, music’s modern frontier provides a place of limitless opportunity and diversity.

Course: RFLA   200A 7                
Instructor: Molly Breckling     
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50
Course Title:  Country Music-Industry Defining

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: Despite country music’s roots in the folk music of Appalachia and the American south, since it first became a commercialized art form in the 1920s, entrepreneurs have attempted to manipulate the images of country performers to either exaggerate or downplay their representation of southern identity, all in an effort to expand the style’s share of the music market. This course will examine the history of country music from three perspectives: its musical style and its evolution, its portrayal of the culture of the American south, and the influence of the country music industry on how those identities are projected in order to appeal to the broadest audiences. Students will learn about country music styles and their origins from the 1920s until today.

Course: RFLA  200A 8                     
Instructor:  Molly Breckling           
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Music and Revolution

Prereq: RFLA 100; Counts as AAAS elective

Course Description: People have sought to overturn those in power throughout history, spawning countless revolutions, uprisings, and protests. Freedom fighters often use music as a tool for spreading their messages and gathering followers. This course will examine instances of revolt and unrest and the musics used to inspire activism around the world from the 18th century to the present. Students will learn of music from the classical western tradition, global revolutionary music, and contemporary popular music.

 

Course: RFLA  200A 9                     
Instructor:  Dawn Roe           
Days/Times: W, 1:00 - 3:30
Course Title:  Photo: Tech, Form & Content

Prereq: RFLA 100; Course meets with ART 285 (91301); Fee: $50

Course Description: This course focuses upon the practice of photography as a fine art, while considering the influence of its commercial, scientific and personal applications.  Students will be encouraged to make connections between their everyday understanding of the photographic image – through social media and family albums, advertising or history books – and how this informs their own artistic application.  Students will leave this course with an experiential understanding of digital techniques and methodologies and competence in the critical discussion of images.  A series of lectures, shooting assignments, lab work, reading assignments and group discussions will cover basic techniques and issues of artistic expression. Innovations in the medium have greatly impacted how the photographic image is both created and received. Highlighting the creative endeavors of past and current practitioners by covering the history of photography will enable students to more fully consider and discuss their own work and the work of others.  Students will gain perspective by positioning their own work alongside the traditions of the history of photography as well as the more recent histories of lens and time-based media such as film/video and on-line imagery.

Course: RFLA  200C 1      
Instructor:  Hannah Carlan                
Days/Times: section 1: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Language, Race, and Power

Prereq100-level rFLA course; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; Counts as AAAS elective

Course Description: This course examines how humans use language to construct and perform social identities, including gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, ability, class, and religion. We will study language through popular culture, film, television, and digital media, as well as through students’ own experiences. Our focus will be on uncovering how language shapes and is shaped by systems of power and inequality.

Course: RFLA  200C 2       
Instructor:  Sydney Yaeger                            
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45
Course Title:  Social Media, Society, and Me

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; Counts as ANT 200 elective

Course Description: This course provides an overview of major topics in anthropology and social media, with a focus on issues of identity, authenticity, and performativity, as well as networks of trust and influence. Focusing on the enduring question of “Why we post” and the consequences of doing so, students will consider their own experiences in the light of social science, such as social media profile creation as a rite of passage critical to identity exploration and formation.

Course: RFLA  200C 3       
Instructor:  Dexter Boniface                    
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50
Course Title:  Rise and Fall of Democracy

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions; Counts as POL 300 elective

Course Description: Philosophers and political scientists have debated the meaning and implications of democratic politics since ancient times. In modern times, democratization remains something of a mystery. Why do some countries democratize, and others do not? Why do some democracies flourish and others collapse? This course seeks to answer these questions and to familiarize students with a few of the prominent theories and methods associated with the comparative study of democracy.

Course: RFLA  200C 5       
Instructor:  Andrew Luchner            
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50
Course Title:  Psychology of Stress

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions

Course Description: Stress seems to be everywhere, inescapable and negatively affecting the lives of everyone. What if there was a different way to understand stress? This course provides students with the opportunity to reconsider from a psychological perspective what stress means, how it impacts us and others, and what we can do about it. Additionally, the course will introduce the practice of effective methods of stress awareness and reduction.

 

Course: RFLA  200C 8                    
Instructor:  J Jenoch                   
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Collective Behavior

Prereq: RFLA 100: Themes: Cultural Collision

Course Description: This course is an analysis of relatively unstructured social situations, such as fads, mobs, crowds, etc., as well as more structured forms of collective behavior such as social movements.

Course: RFLA  200C 9                    
Instructor:  Tahmina Rahman                   
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  South Asian Politics

Prereq: RFLA 100; Not open to students registered in POL 315 (91450)

Course Description: Welcome to South Asian Politics! This course will critically analyze the history and politics of the seven original member states of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC): India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Maldives, and Bhutan. The course has several broad goals. First, to introduce the history of colonialism and nationalism in South Asia through the eyes of marginalized women, peasants, and workers. Subaltern readings of history will reveal how the colonial experience has shaped political institutions. Second, to analyze social cleavages—ethnicity, religion, caste, language— in relation to ethnic nationalist movements like the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam in Sri Lanka, religious extremist groups in Pakistan and Bangladesh, Maosist movement in Nepal, and separatist movements in India. Third, to understand the rise of populist leaders and parties in the region and its impact on liberal democracy and bilateral relations between countries. We will also examine regional innovations focused on sharing natural resources and common river water, addressing climate change, and regulating migration, and critique SAARC’s potential to help implement these innovations. The course concludes with a discussion of South Asia’s relationships with extra-regional powers like China and the United States.

Course: RFLA  200S 1                 
Instructor:  Emily Nodine             
Days/Times: MWF 10:00 - 10:50 Lab: W, 2:00 - 5:00
Course Title:  Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes

Prereq:  RFLA 100; Themes: Cultural Collision, Environments; counts as a 200-level elective in Environmental Studies

Course Description - Springs are often thought to have mystical, healing properties and lakes are prized for their tranquility. Swamps sound like dark and scary places where you might get stuck or lost or eaten alive. What do these ecosystems have in common? Why are they different? In this class, explore the watery landscapes of Florida and learn about the ecosystem processes that shape the way we value them.

Course: RFLA  200S 2                   
Instructor:  Fiona Harper                 
Days/Times: MW, 10:00 - 10:50 Lab: T, 8:00 - 10:45
Course Title:  Oceans in Crisis

Prereq:  RFLA 100; Themes: Cultural Collision, Environments

Course Description: Climate change is causing the global sea temperatures to increase, the potential loss of species like the polar bear as the seas warm, and the loss of corals due to bleaching. Overfishing has reduced global fisheries to less than 10% of their original stock sizes in the last 100 years. While eco-tourism is benefiting some countries economically, global travel is introducing non-native invasive species into fragile areas like Antarctica. Oceans in crisis examines the conflicts between human populations over the use of marine resources, and the impacts of human activities on marine ecosystems.

Course: RFLA  200S 3                

Instructor:  Paul Stephenson       

Days/Times: MWF, 10:00-10:50 Lab: T, 8:00-10:45
Course Title:  Ecology of Florida Environments

Prereq:  Theme: Cultural Collision : Counts towards an elective in Biology;

Course Description: Florida is one of the most ecologically rich states in the U.S. with some of the most unique ecosystems in the world, containing a remarkable number of endemic species. Florida is so large that it spans three climate zones, and its ecosystems are adapted to frequent fires and floods. If it was not for the fact that it is surrounded by water on three sides, Florida would actually be a desert! Thus, it is no surprise that Florida was still largely a wilderness just 100 years ago. Wild Florida examines the interaction between humans and these natural ecosystems. From Florida’s emergence out of the ocean to settlement by Native Americans and first contact with Europeans on through the present day, how have these interactions shaped Florida’s past and how will they impact Florida’s future? We will focus particularly on plants, their biology, diversity, and their economic and social impact. We will also address issues confronting Florida today; rapid population growth, urban sprawl, water shortages, pollution, invasive species, global climate change, agricultural threats and what scientists and community activists can do to ensure a better future for Florida. Marjorie Stoneman Douglas wrote of ecological restoration in south Florida that….”The Everglades is a test. If we pass it, we get to keep the planet.” Today one could argue that the entire state of Florida poses a test for the preservation of biodiversity.

Course: RFLA  200S 4                   
Instructor:  Kathryn Sutherland      
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50 Lab: T, 8:00 - 10:45
Course Title:  Ecology of Environmental Issues

Prereq:  RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Environments

Course Description: The current global human population exceeds 7.6 billion. The exponential growth of our species is triggering a global environmental crisis by depleting land and water resources essential to the sustained survival of human and wildlife populations. This course will introduce you to the biological and ecological principles that form the basis for understanding current environmental issues: population growth, loss of species diversity, resource limitation, pollution, and global climate change. You will be exposed to the diversity of species and habitats on Earth while learning about the role of biology and ecology in the conservation of these valuable resources. As a global citizen, you should understand the scientific principles that underlie the conservation issues facing the world today. Through observations and analyses in the classroom, field, and laboratory, you will become equipped with the knowledge necessary to make informed lifestyle decisions that have a positive impact on the conservation of local and global environmental resources.

Course: RFLA  200S 5                    
Instructor:  Ashley Cannaday             
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45 Lab: M, 2:30-5:00
Course Title:  Physics of Everyday Things

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Innovation, Enduring Questions

Course Description: Have you ever found yourself wondering: how do musical instruments produce the beautiful notes we hear? How do bicycles move? What causes light bulbs to emit light? In this course, we will use the principles of physics to answer the question “How does THAT work?” We will explore familiar objects, such as microwaves, televisions, bathroom scales, and engines, and use physics to explain the inner workings of the world around us.

Course: RFLA  200S 7 & 8                   
Instructor:  Thomas Moore               
Days/Times: section 6 TR, 8:00 - 9:15 Lab: W, 2:00-5:00; section 7 TR 11:00 - 12:15 Lab: T,2:00-5:00
Course Title:  The Science of Musical Instruments

Prereq: 100 level RFLA course; Themes: Innovation, Environments; MCMP

Course Description - This course introduces the students to the science of musical instruments, the historical development of modern instruments, and the issues associated with the design and construction of new instruments. The content emphasizes the creativity of instrument makers, focusing on the scientific aspects that make each instrument sound as it does. There is a prerequisite of math competency

Course: RFLA  200S 8                     
Instructor:  Rachelle Yankelevitz                 
Days/Times: TR, 8:00 - 9:15 Lab: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Human Animal Interactions

Prereq: RFLA 100; Theme: Enduring Questions

Course Description: Many of us consider dogs our best friends, yet we have a lot to learn about their abilities and preferences. In this course, we will study our canine companions, and other domesticated animals, in order to learn how to use the tools of science to reach objective, replicable conclusions that can improve the lives of humans and animals alike.

Course: RFLA  200S 9                     
Instructor:  Samantha Fonseca Douguet                 
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45 Lab: R, 2:00-4:00
Course Title:  The Science in the Art of Leonardo da Vinci

Prereq: RFLA 100; Theme: Enduring Questions

Course Description: Leonardo da Vinci was a man ahead of his time.  He thrived in arts, science and technology, uncovering new directions with scientific art.  We will investigate his life and the breadth and depth of his scientific studies.  The topics include: anatomy and physiology, plant morphology, geology, mechanics, waves, optics, fluid dynamics, civil engineering, ballistics, and mathematics. 

Course: RFLA  200S 10                     
Instructor:  Brian Mosby                 
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45 Lab: F, 2:00-5:00
Course Title:  Human Animal Interactions

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: Exploring Everyday Materials presents a scientific approach to understanding the materials that we interact with on a regular basis. Investigation will focus on the structure, properties, performance, synthesis, and processing of common materials such as steel, paper, and concrete.

Course: RFLA  200H 1   
Instructor:  Benjamin Hudson                  
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Witch in History

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; counts as an elective in ENG

Course Description: This course will consider the figure of the witch as a cultural and social phenomenon across the globe from Russian folktales to Caribbean ritual. Students can expect to analyze poetry, novels, and works of sociology in addition to classic films like The Wizard of Oz to understand how the witch has been constructed as a maligned cultural figure.

Course: RFLA  200H 2    
Instructor:  Jill Jones                  
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Breaking Bad and the American Novel

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions. Counts as an elective in ENG

Course Description: This course will examine the television series, Breaking Bad, in the context of American literature and culture, and through the lens of ethics and moral theory. We will discuss the ways in which the texts present and interrogate the American Dream and individual choice, as well as how it presents and challenges various moral frameworks. We will examine Walter White in the context of American literature to see if he is a particularly American (anti) hero, and to ask what his story—and its popularity in our culture—tells us about contemporary American society. Villain or anti-hero; cautionary tale or dark comedy?

Course: RFLA  200H 3    
Instructor:  Li Wei                  
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45
Course Title:  Otherness in World Music

Prereq: RFLA 100; Theme: Identity; Counts as AAAS elective

Course Description: Is music a universal language? If yes, where is semantics? If not, why Gangnam Style and some other "ethnic" music enjoy huge popularity across culture? While musical expression is a common human behavior, the meaning of it is often cultural specific. In this course, we will look into the cognitive and semiotic aspects of music and examine how music shapes our cultural perception of identity. In particular, we will look at some important historical moments and cultural sites of world music (a mass-mediated, cross-cultural evolving popular music genre), examining how accelerated transnational movements of people, ideas, and information reshape the soundscape of modern world and our perception of cultural boundary.

Course: RFLA  200H 4  
Instructor:  Alberto Prieto-Calixto                  
Days/Times: section 5: TR, 8:00 - 9:15
Course Title:  Spanish Identity Through the Lens

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision

Course Description: The course explores the ways in which the Spanish identity has been shaped as a body of people who speak the same language. Through the analysis of various visual materials; films, documentaries, news media, popular culture artifacts, etc, this course examines how the Spanish speaking world defines its diverse ethnic, religious, cultural and national identities and how these identities have been created, revised and used.

Course: RFLA  200H 5  
Instructor:  Thomas Cook               
Days/Times: MW, 2:30-3:45
Course Title:  Biomedical Enhancements

Prereq: RFLA 100: Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions

Course Description: The course will focus on ethical, philosophical and social controversies related to human enhancement -- chiefly enhancement through bio-medical technology (pharmacology, genetic engineering, surgery, etc.).

Course: RFLA  200H 6  
Instructor:  Victoria Machado              
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Nature Spirituality

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Environment, Enduring Questions

Course Description: What did John Muir allude to when he pronounced ‘the mountain is calling’? What does it mean when activists declare ‘water is life’? How can we understand those who feel, see, or experience the divine in nature? Drawing from such ideas, this class will explore the natural world from spiritual and religious perspectives. We will cover indigenous perceptions of the land, transcendental thought, the ‘greening’ of mainstream religion, sacred spaces, and the rise of eco-spirituality practices that may involve but are not limited to pagan, new age, and SBNR (‘spiritual but not religious’) thought. Collectively our class will re-think how we understand human-nature relationships within the lens of the spiritual.

Course: RFLA  300 1  
Instructor:  Anne Murdaugh
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Tilt and Spin

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Theme: Environments

Course Description: The Earth’s axis is tilted by 23.5 degrees. This tilt unevenly distributes the sunlight across the Earth, giving rise to unique cultural practices, the early science advancements, seasons, and biodiversity. The tilt also influences the effects of and solutions to climate change. In this course, students will explore the intersection of culture, policy, and science to more deeply understand how our path through the stars shapes our past and future.

Course: RFLA  300 2  
Instructor:  Sarah Parsloe
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  My Body, Myself

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions

Course Description: This course explores how we communicate to (re)create embodied identities, producing and resisting cultural definitions of “normalcy.” We will focus on specific embodied experiences, including illness, injury, disability, fatness, queerness, and race. We will also consider how people respond to identity threats, including their own changing, unpredictable bodies. As part of your semester-long interview-based project, you and a partner will develop a podcast episode exploring one aspect of embodiment that you find particularly fascinating.

Course: RFLA  300 3  
Instructor:  Hesham Mesbah
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Global Journalism

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Themes: Cultural Collision

Course Description: This class is about global news, global media organizations and networks, and global issues presented in specific global media outlets. Students will analyze news in the global press, explore the historical, legal, ethical, and political contexts of those news outlets, and critique theories and effects of globalization.

Course: RFLA  300 4  
Instructor:  Lisa Tillmann
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Incarceration and Inequality

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Course meets with CMC 325 (91859); Counts as AAAS elective

Course Description: Walter Scott, Philando Castile, Tamir Rice: two men of color and a Black boy of 12. Any of us can watch a video of their deaths at the hands of police. What is--and ought to be--the relationship between the US criminal justice system and the communities it "serves and protects"? How can our engagement as citizens bring more justice to our justice system? Course may count as CMC elective.

Course: RFLA  300 5  
Instructor:  Lucy Littler
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Racial Fictions

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; The third RFLA 200 can be taken concurrently; Counts as AAAS elective; Themes: Identity, Environments

Course Description: In this course we will examine race as fiction—a carefully constructed narrative that draws audiences in and solicits their belief in its “truth.” We will consider how race has been made, revised, and used in American culture. Course texts will include novels, multidisciplinary scholarship, news media, and pop-culture artifacts.

Course: RFLA  300 6  
Instructor:  Mary Robinson
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Asian American Identity Through Representation

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Themes: Cultural Collisions, Enduring Questions

Course Description: This course will examine how Asian American Identity is represented through various means including but not limited to media, the arts, gender, food, and politics. Students will first gain an historical and contextual foundation of Asians in America and the challenges and consequences that representation, or misrepresentation, Asian Americans face.

Course: RFLA  300 7  
Instructor:  Zeynep Teymuroglu
Days/Times: MW, 2:30-3:45
Course Title:  Interdisciplinary Mathematics

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP

Course Description: This course will help students acknowledge that math is not about memorizing formulas—it is a powerful tool to apply across disciplines. We will use mathematical modeling techniques to solve a wide range of problems in sciences, sociology, and economics.

Course: RFLA  300 8  
Instructor: Barry Allen
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Americas Gifts

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description: This course explores the uniquely American circumstances that gave rise to the development of jazz, baseball and National Parks. All of these icons of Americana exhibit many of the dynamic (and often conflicting) forces at work in American history. For example, the preservation of land in National Parks ran directly counter to the essentially materialistic and exploitative approach to nature that governed 19th century America. Jazz represents the collision of European and African musical forms, which produced an unprecedented opportunity for exploration and innovation. And (sadly), baseball is at odds with a contemporary American culture that is increasingly violent, impatient and overbearing. Underlying themes of the course include the roles of race, class, gender and capitalism, as well as the relationship between the individual and the group.

Course: RFLA  300 9  
Instructor: Hillary Cooperman
Days/Times: TR, 8:00-9:15
Course Title:  Refugees Middle East Peform Lab

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Counts as MENA elective

Course Description: In this course we will learn about different cultures and societies through their performance practices. We will relate the local performances with globalization processes such as neoliberalist and human rights discourses. We will also think about our own identities and location in relation to those we read about and study. Students will have a chance to conduct their own performance research and  express their findings through expressive artforms.

Course: RFLA  300 10  
Instructor: Hilary Cooperman
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Critical Performance Ethnography

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; The third RFLA 200 can be taken concurrently; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; Counts as AAAS elective

Course Description: In this course students will think critically about their everyday lives as a site of research. They will learn to notice and examine the relationships and actions of those around them and to think about these acts as contributing to, or resisting social norms and discourses. They will engage in their own research project by choosing a particular site in which they have some kind of vested interest. Finally, they will learn to think about various ethical stances and the importance of cultivating a sense of justice and ethics in the way in which they themselves "perform" their research.

Course: RFLA  300 11  
Instructor: Stephanie Gonzalez Guittar
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00-10:50
Course Title:  Intersections of the Latinx Experience

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collisions

Course Description: This course presents an overview of the Latinx experience in the United States with a focus on intersectionality, stereotypes, and identity formation and management. Latinos are largely viewed as a singular minority group, the largest growing minority group in the U.S. In this course, we will use an intersectional approach to analyze the unique identities and experiences of Latinx sub-groups. For example, Puerto Ricans and Mexican-Americans share a common language but their history, heritage, and lived experience in the U.S. is very different from one another as evident in the social outcomes in various social institutions. The same goes for Cubans, Central and South Americans, first-generation immigrants, third-generation immigrant, etc. Through a sociological intersectional lens, we will delve into how Latinxs have been studied, why we use the term Latinx instead of Latino/a or Hispanic, the gaps in research, the effect of social policies on Latinxs as well as the contributions of Latinxs to the U.S. economy and culture.

Course: RFLA  100A 1 & 2
Instructor: Suzanne Jamir Nahal 
Days/Times: section 1: TR, 8:00-9:15 & section 2: 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Writing Ghost Stories

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Identity, Innovation

Course Description: Ghost stories are attached to place. In the South, we are arguably more familiar with ghost stories, and such stories are frequently intertwined with places so that these ghost stories reflect their communities in ways that incorporate and transcend time, thereby illuminating sociological perspectives and identity politics. We will explore how some regional and local ghost stories originated, endure now, and reflect the flux in communities and their places. Our course will utilize an artistic approach with the workshop set-up, focusing on creative writing, the fictional writing of ghost stories that are original or linked with existing ones. Students will also compose reflective artist statements.

Course: RFLA  100A 3  
Instructor: Kim Dennis
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00-9:50 
Course Title:  History of Art: Renaissance-Modern

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Enduring Questions, Identity

Course Description: This course examines gender identity and sexuality in art of the Italian Renaissance. Topics will include ideal masculinity and femininity, the male and female nude, homoeroticism, marriage, and childbearing.

Course: RFLA  100A 4  
Instructor: Missy Barnes
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45 
Course Title:  Imagination, Courage, and Creative Expression

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Identity, Innovation

Course Description: tba

Course: RFLA  100C 1 & 2
Instructor: Wendy Brandon
Days/Times: section 1: TR, 8:00-9:15 & section 2: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Food Democracy

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description: Food Democracy critically examines the contemporary food system by looking at global food-related problems such as, the prevalence of undernutrition in the developed world, food crises in the world’s conflict zones, the emergence of overnutrition in the developing world, and inequalities in food production, distribution, and consumption. In addition, we will learn about food activism and food justice movements/advocacy organizations that are challenging an unjust and unsustainable global food system.

Course: RFLA  100C 3
Instructor: Hannah Ewing
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Barbarians

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Cultural Collision, Enduring Questions

Course Description: Barbarians: we think mysterious, hairy, wild, violent people with no culture and who pose a threat to civilization itself. But what is a barbarian? Who determines barbarianism? And how do civilizations integrate strange and new peoples into their worldviews? In large part, this class examines literary and historical run-ins with ‘barbarians’ in Europe and the Middle East. By studying how dominant civilizations wrote about, imagined, and interacted with ‘barbarians,’ we question the ideas of civilization and barbarism, uncover truths about both parties, and explore the larger impact of the ‘civilized’ and the ‘primitive.’

Course: RFLA  100C 4
Instructor: Josh Savala
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Histories of the Pacific Ocean

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; counts as a 100 level elective in History

Course Description: This class seeks to understand the place of the Pacific in history over the past few centuries. Over the course of the semester we will cover topics as varied as slavery, migration, social movements, colonialism, and piracy, while pulling readings from history, anthropology, sociology, literature, and geography. We will ask questions about the definition of the Pacific, different types of slavery, the shape of migration and diaspora, and the relationship between people and animals, among others. Central to the course is experimenting with the problem: what does a Pacific approach—and an oceanic approach at that—do for our understanding of the world?

Course: RFLA  100C 5
Instructor: Alice Davidson
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Lifespan Development

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Theme: Identity

Course Description: Lifespan Development focuses on human development from conception through the end of life. Theories of human development, current research, and practical application will be integrated throughout the course to provide a basic understanding of the profound changes that occur in the developing human being in cultural context across the lifespan. These changes involve physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional development. This course is appropriate for students pursuing a variety of fields, including psychology, education, nursing and other health professions.

Course: RFLA  100C 6
Instructor: Anna Szopa
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00-10:50
Course Title:  Business for Social Impact

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Theme: Innovation; Counts as SE 100

Course Description: How can business be used to tackle critical social and environmental problems in our world? You will learn how successful social entrepreneurs create and drive positive change, and how and why meaningful social changes happen. After considering the root causes of problems our society faces, you will identify and explain new approaches to making change through for-profit, non-profit, or hybrid social enterprises, like founders, employees, and ecosystem developers, among other roles. This is a project-based course; you will develop your ability to recognize opportunities in the midst of pressing local and global problems and apply concepts and frameworks to further develop those opportunities.

Course: RFLA  100C 7
Instructor: Ja'Nya Jenoch
Days/Times: MW, 2:30-3:45
Course Title:  Sociology of Film

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Cultural Collisions, Identity

Course Description: As the saying goes “Art imitates life.” One of our most enduring and impactful art forms has been the motion picture. Ever since the silent film era, movies have been used to portray life and all of its complexities. This course will introduce a variety of film genres to students to enhance their knowledge of the major areas of sociology. Students will be able to critically think and communicate about society as they learn how film mirrors life and in turn shapes our social and cultural identities. They will learn how art imitates life, and how life imitates art.

Course: RFLA  100H 1
Instructor: Steven Schoen
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Online Storytelling

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Identity, Innovation

Course Description: More and more we tell our stories online. This digital environment with its multimedia mix of words, sounds and images offers nearly unending possibilities for people to express themselves and better understand others across a wide range of differences. In this course you will study the ways these words, sounds and images work to shape meaning and form engaging stories. You will practice telling evocative, creative, and powerful stories that connect personally significant aspects of yourself to important issues in the world. And you will create a series of online projects building on insights from class and your own media skills.

Course: RFLA  100H 2
Instructor: Emily Russell
Days/Times: MW, 2:30-3:45
Course Title:  Gruesome Anatomy

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions

Course Description: The minute focus of a medical examiner during autopsy; the seductive cry of the carnival barker asking you to, “Step right in"; the varied ways in which doctors, both real and fictional, repurpose corpses for new ends; each of these acts associated with bodies is surprisingly similar to the skills of reading and writing well. In this course, we'll read about bodies at all kinds of extremes: from medical cadavers, to murder victims, to freak show performers. In the process, we will learn to think differently and more critically about reading by analyzing texts that are themselves strange, often both in subject matter and style.

Course: RFLA  100H 3
Instructor: Todd French
Days/Times: TR, 9:30-10:45
Course Title:  Extremes of Religion

Prereq: Open to 1st year students only, during registration

Course Description: Touchdown Jesus, genital mutilation, voluntary starvation, cultic sex, immolation, and hymen reconstruction: If you are fascinated by human behavior and big questions that do not have simple answers, this class is for you. This course invites students to explore what we may not know about our world, our community, our friends and families, and ourselves. Ranging from body modification to glorification of the perfect virginal form; abject poverty to extraordinary wealth; rolling saints to popes and bishops; megachurches to monastic retreats; and selfless love to imposed terror—Religion has mapped an array of extremes onto various cultures throughout world history. This course will seek instances of extreme religious behavior, asking how these movements have become normative in various communities. Determining why and when religious practice progresses from passion and devotion to that which our society deems “extreme,” we will explore what narratives are employed to maintain the feverish pitch of holy otherness. Restraining simple criticisms of those actions that are not in harmony with personal experiences, the student will be asked to search for motivating historical, religious, and social factors that move participants ever closer to their concept of divinity. Our challenge will be to understand how this extreme religious behavior relates to our contemporary world. Students will explore the mysterious and marvelous practices of contemporary religion, attempting to understand why humans comport themselves in particular ways. It will assess social mores, global perspectives, and perceptions of the other, by trying to understand the underlying motivations in religious practices. Students will be asked to think critically about different cultural perspectives, examining the impact these traditions have on their local and global communities. The class will work in both local and global examples, such as a Qur’an burning pastor in Gainesville, the commodification of religion in a local religious amusement park, and nearby megachurches, as well as the more removed topics of asceticism, immolation, mutilation, diet, terror, and ritual. It will necessarily take into account the impact of religious and national identities in the construction of imagined communities (Benedict Anderson), asking the student to think from others’ perspectives.

Course: RFLA  200A 1
Instructor: Dawn Roe
Days/Times: R, 8:00-10:45
Course Title:  Conceptual Documentary Practice_CE

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; Fee: $50

Course Description: This CE course offers students the opportunity to engage with ethical considerations inherent to photographic projects concerned with the politics of representation. Working directly with members of the Hannibal Square neighborhood, students will produce individual works and contribute to a collaborative series of documentary style images that reflect upon the impact of gentrification within the neighborhood. By studying historical documentary projects alongside contemporary works that challenge notions of truth and authenticity, students will learn to scrutinize the photographic image and its presumed status as a marker of the “real.” Fee $50.

Course: RFLA  200A 2
Instructor: Rachel Simmons
Days/Times: MW, 2:30-3:45
Course Title:  The Power of Print_CE

Prereq: RFLA 100; Course counts as ART 272; CE course; Fee: $50

Course Description: This course examines gender identity and sexuality in art of the Italian Renaissance. Topics will include ideal masculinity and femininity, the male and female nude, homoeroticism, marriage, and childbearing. CE course.

Course: RFLA  200A 3                   
Instructor:  Audrey Hope             
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45
Course Title:  Introduction to Sculpture

Prereq: RFLA 100; Fee: $50

Course Description: This studio course introduces the fundamentals of contemporary sculptural practice with an emphasis on spatial awareness, problem-solving, and conceptual development. Students will investigate sculptural form as a means of cultural production through technical exercises, hands-on studio projects, critiques, slide lectures, readings, and discussions. The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of contemporary conceptual issues, materials and strategies for making sculpture. Students will develop their technical, formal and conceptual knowledge of art making, while beginning to identify the vocabularies and concerns that inform their own work. Students will expand their technical and problem-solving skills both through general demonstrations and exercises and in response to unique problems arising from their own projects. Fee $50.

Course: RFLA  200A 4                    
Instructor:  Chuck Archard            
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Musical 1 Hit Wonders

Prereq: RFLA 100: Themes: Identity, Cultural Collisions

Course Description:  This course will examine the unpredictability of the music industry and unravel many of the factors that influenced the creation of Pop hits from the 1970s to the present. Many of the factors explored in class will include talent versus looks, digital recording, the corporatization of record labels, sampling, global communication, streaming, social media, and behavioral targeting, as well as the overall zeitgeist of each era.

Course: RFLA  200A 5                    
Instructor:  Dan Flick           
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50
Course Title:  Music Meets Life

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: As Albert Einstein said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” Research reflects that those who regularly engage in creative activities and invest time in expanding their imaginations are better able to respond to challenging situations and experiences. They are therefore better able, in the words of the Rollins College Mission Statement, “to pursue meaningful lives and productive careers.” In this course, students will engage in creative explorations that involve imagination and written, physical, and verbal expression in order to develop courage, resilience, and a stronger sense of identity.

Course: RFLA  200A 6                    
Instructor:  John Sinclair           
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Marriage of Music and Lyrics

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description:  Poetry is the “music” of language as music is the “language” of sound, and for every musical term there is a parallel poetic or literary term. So prominent is the musical quality of poetry that Edgar Allen Poe describes it as “music…. combined with pleasurable sounds.”

Course: RFLA  200A 7 & 10                  
Instructor:  Molly Breckling           
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00 - 9:50
Course Title:  Foundations of Liberal Arts

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: tba

Course: RFLA  200A 8                    
Instructor:  Caitlin Mohr           
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Songs of the Soul

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: This course will examine song literature through the perspectives of the poet, composer and performer.  Elements of song will be examined in repertoire from Copland to Lady Gaga to the musical Hamilton.  Students will reflect on the breadth of their personal experiences and expression of self-identity in relation to a diverse community of artists of the past and present.

Course: RFLA  200A 11                    
Instructor:  Anne Zimmerman           
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Telling Your Story: Writing Memoirs

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions; Counts as ENG elective

Course Description:  “I wanted to write a lie. You wanted to read that lie. I wrote this to you instead.” Kiese Laymon, Heavy Like so many writers before him, Kiese Laymon understands the very personal nature of memoir, and of how his story resonates with his readers. Like him, all of us want to be heard. Experience, culture, identity—this is what makes the story of a life.

Course: RFLA  200A 12                    
Instructor:  Robin Gerchman         
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Dance and Activism

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision.

Course DescriptionThis course explores different dimensions of dance as a strategy for social justice. As a system of communication that speaks with the body, this draws attention to the egalitarian nature of dance and its ability to be a tool for activism practice. Through the analyzation of choreographic compositions, both domestic and global, this course captures dance as an empowering agent for action.

Course: RFLA  200C 01                    
Instructor:  Sydney Yaeger       
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Social Media, Society, and Me

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; Course counts as ANT 200 elective

Course DescriptionThis course provides an overview of major topics in anthropology and social media, with a focus on issues of identity, authenticity, and performativity, as well as networks of trust and influence. Focusing on the enduring question of “Why we post” and the consequences of doing so, students will consider their own experiences in the light of social science, such as social media profile creation as a rite of passage critical to identity exploration and formation.

Course: RFLA  200C 02                    
Instructor:  Pavielle Haines   
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00 - 9:50
Course Title:  Politics and Film

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions; Counts as POL 200 elective

Course DescriptionThis course will explore important topics and themes in American politics by examining how they are presented in movies and television shows.

Course: RFLA  200C 03                    
Instructor:  Mari Robertson   
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Big Problems: Panics, Crashes, and Pandemonium

Prereq: 100 RFLA course; theme: Cultural Collision; counts for a 200-level elective in Economics

Course DescriptionThis course explores interdisciplinary causes, consequences, and social impacts of periods of economic havoc over the past three centuries. We take a broad approach to the historical examples studied to include asset bubbles and banking crises but also sovereign debt bankruptcies and hyperinflations. We explore the interesting characters who are known to personify these tragic events and explore why those people falling for such schemes are so easily manipulated. We also look to see if government regulation is the solution to these problems.

Course: RFLA  200C 04                    
Instructor:  Joanna Eisele   
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00 - 9:50
Course Title:  Sociology of Popular Culture

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description:  tba

Course: RFLA  200H 01                    
Instructor:  Margaret McLaren
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Ethics and Global Justice

Prereq: 100 RFLA; themes: Cultural Collision, Enduring Questions

Course DescriptionDaily we are confronted with ethical questions about how to act in our personal lives and in the world as responsible and engaged citizens. In this course you will learn the moral theories and frameworks that justify moral judgments, and how to apply them to pressing social and political issues such as abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, immigration, human rights, multiculturalism and women’s rights, global poverty, cultural sovereignty, and world hunger relief.

Course: RFLA  200H 02                    
Instructor:  Ryan Musgrave
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50
Course Title:  Ethics, Politics, and Art

Prereq: RFLA 100

Course Description: tba

Course: RFLA  200H 03                    
Instructor:  Todd French
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Christianity: Thought/Practice

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Cultural Collision, Enduring Questions; Course meets with REL 218 (11543)

Course Description:  Touchdown Jesus, genital mutilation, voluntary starvation, cultic sex, immolation, and hymen reconstruction: If you are fascinated by human behavior and big questions that do not have simple answers, this class is for you. This course invites students to explore what we may not know about our world, our community, our friends and families, and ourselves. Ranging from body modification to glorification of the perfect virginal form; abject poverty to extraordinary wealth; rolling saints to popes and bishops; megachurches to monastic retreats; and selfless love to imposed terror—Religion has mapped an array of extremes onto various cultures throughout world history. This course will seek instances of extreme religious behavior, asking how these movements have become normative in various communities. Determining why and when religious practice progresses from passion and devotion to that which our society deems “extreme,” we will explore what narratives are employed to maintain the feverish pitch of holy otherness. Restraining simple criticisms of those actions that are not in harmony with personal experiences, the student will be asked to search for motivating historical, religious, and social factors that move participants ever closer to their concept of divinity. Our challenge will be to understand how this extreme religious behavior relates to our contemporary world. Students will explore the mysterious and marvelous practices of contemporary religion, attempting to understand why humans comport themselves in particular ways. It will assess social mores, global perspectives, and perceptions of the other, by trying to understand the underlying motivations in religious practices. Students will be asked to think critically about different cultural perspectives, examining the impact these traditions have on their local and global communities. The class will work in both local and global examples, such as a Qur’an burning pastor in Gainesville, the commodification of religion in a local religious amusement park, and nearby megachurches, as well as the more removed topics of asceticism, immolation, mutilation, diet, terror, and ritual. It will necessarily take into account the impact of religious and national identities in the construction of imagined communities (Benedict Anderson), asking the student to think from others’ perspectives.

Course: RFLA  200S 01                    
Instructor:  Ashley Cannaday
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45 Lab: M, 2:30-5:00
Course Title:  Lasers and Light

Prereq: RFLA 100; Themes: Innovation, Enduring Questions

Course DescriptionLight is a huge part of everyday life, crucial for vision, phone screens, the pictures we upload to social media, and healthcare. This course will explore the nature of light and delve into several important applications and technologies that utilize various properties of optics. We will "shed light" on many interesting phenomena caused by light to better understand the world around us.

Course: RFLA  200S 02                    
Instructor:  Anne Murdaugh
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00 - 9:50 Lab: F, 2:30-5:30
Course Title:  Powering the World

Prereq: 100 - level RFLA: Themes: Innovation, Environments

Course DescriptionIn a world run by electronics, how do we get our power? What makes electricity, and how does it find it’s way to your devices? In this course, we will analyze these questions, dive into the difference between renewable and non-renewable energy, and explore the challenges we face to provide power to the world.

Course: RFLA  200S 03                    
Instructor:  Brendaliz Santiago-Narvaez
Days/Times: MWF, 10:00 - 10:50 Lab: tba
Course Title:  Microbes and Society

Prereq: 100 level RFLA course; Themes: Innovation, Environments

Course DescriptionMicroorganisms make up one of the most abundant life forms on earth. As humans, we are mostly bacteria! Their existence over millions of years links them to all existing living forms, making microorganisms (specifically bacteria and viruses) unique partners of mankind. In this course, we will explore the history, biology, and relevance of microorganisms in order to better understand the relationship we have with them.

Course: RFLA  200S 4                     
Instructor:  Samantha Fonseca Douguet                 
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45 Lab: tba
Course Title:  The Science in the Art of Leonardo da Vinci

Prereq: RFLA 100; Theme: Enduring Questions

Course Description: Leonardo da Vinci was a man ahead of his time.  He thrived in arts, science and technology, uncovering new directions with scientific art.  We will investigate his life and the breadth and depth of his scientific studies.  The topics include: anatomy and physiology, plant morphology, geology, mechanics, waves, optics, fluid dynamics, civil engineering, ballistics, and mathematics. 

Course: RFLA  300 01                    
Instructor:  Vidhu Aggarwal
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Pleasure and Pain

Prereq: Two 200-level RFLA courses; the third 200-level RFLA course can be taken concurrently; Themes: Identity, Cultural Collision; counts for a 200 ENG elective

Course DescriptionWe will examine “negative” affects (unease, shame) in the formal structures of various cultural products: films, television, comics, literature, and artwork. What makes up our fascination with certain forms of negativity, particularly when it is ritualized through narrative and performance? How do we consume such emotion as pleasurable? We will examine these questions critically, theoretically, and artistically, via the lens of gender, race, and sexuality. Why are certain types of “negative” emotions privileged in our art, culture, and media? Are these expressions self-indulgent, cathartic, consoling, liberating and/or all of the above? Eventually, you will do a final project where you apply the ideas and concepts from this class to an area of interest to you (political science, art)

Course: RFLA  300 02                    
Instructor:  Mattea Garcia
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45
Course Title:  Communication and Wellbeing

Prereq: 3-200 RFLA courses; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions

Course DescriptionThis course will explore the ways communication influences our sense of wellbeing and our ability to achieve it. How we talk about things and what we choose to talk about influences our relationships, our sense of self, and how we navigate the world around us. as we pursue productive careers and meaningful lives. From resilience and compassion to social support and empathic listening, we will consider how wellbeing is created and supported through communication interaction. We will discuss the ways discourses around us, including social media, influence our ideas of self-care, wellness, and happiness. Though we will ground our work in a communication approach, we will read work from psychologists, sociologists, and other disciplinary experts.

Course: RFLA  300 03                    
Instructor:  Sarah Parsloe
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  My Body, Myself

Prereq: RFLA 100; at least 2 RFLA 200; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions

Course DescriptionThis course explores how we communicate to (re)create embodied identities, producing and resisting cultural definitions of “normalcy.” We will focus on specific embodied experiences, including illness, injury, disability, fatness, queerness, and race. We will also consider how people respond to identity threats, including their own changing, unpredictable bodies. As part of your semester-long interview-based project, you and a partner will develop a podcast episode exploring one aspect of embodiment that you find particularly fascinating.

Course: RFLA  300 04                    
Instructor:  James McLaughlin & Yudit Greenberg
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Learning and Teaching about the Holocaust

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; The third 200-level RFLA course can be taken concurrently; Themes: Identity, Enduring Questions; Counts as JWS elective; Course with embedded field study; Register in International Programs

Course DescriptionStudents will learn about Jewish life in Europe before World War II, the reasons for the rise of Nazism and the persecution of Jews, the different roles that people played during this time, and the outcomes of the Holocaust for people from many backgrounds. We will analyze the diaries of Jewish children who were hidden or forced into ghettos and camps, and hear survivor testimonies, to know more about what those people experienced. A vital part of the course will be a 6-day Field Study trip to Krakow, Poland, which will include a study tour of Auschwitz-Birkenau. We will end by considering how survivors have made meaning from the Holocaust, relating the past to current social issues, and examining the best ways to teach about the Holocaust.

Course: RFLA  300 05                    
Instructor:  Yudit Greenberg
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Learning and Teaching about the Holocaust

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP; Themes: Enduring Questions, Identity; Counts as JWS elective

Course DescriptionStudents will learn about Jewish life in Europe before World War II, the reasons for the rise of Nazism and the persecution of Jews, the different roles that people played during this time, and the outcomes of the Holocaust for people from many backgrounds. We will analyze the diaries of Jewish children who were hidden or forced into ghettos and camps, and hear survivor testimonies, to know more about what those people experienced. A vital part of the course will be a 6-day Field Study trip to Krakow, Poland, which will include a study tour of Auschwitz-Birkenau. We will end by considering how survivors have made meaning from the Holocaust, relating the past to current social issues, and examining the best ways to teach about the Holocaust.

Course: RFLA  300 06                   
Instructor:  Sheri Boyd
Days/Times: MWF, 9:00 - 9:50
Course Title:  Social Choice Mathematics

Prereq: Two 200-level RFLA courses. Themes: Cultural Collisions, Enduring Questions

Course DescriptionHow do different societies choose their leaders? What roles do tradition and ideology play in the structure of government? We will research and compare voting systems and representative legislatures from around the world, applying principles of voting theory and fair division to study the ways diverse groups of people select and empower their leaders.

Course: RFLA  300 07                   
Instructor:  tba
Days/Times: tba
Course Title:  Foundations of Liberal Arts

Prereq: Two RFLA 200

Course Description: tba

Course: RFLA  300 08                   
Instructor:  Jennifer Queen
Days/Times: MW, 2:30 - 3:45
Course Title:  Psychology Saves the World

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP

Course Description:  For every career, there is a psychological application.  Psychology is used to solve problems in fields as diverse as business, education, law, sports, and mental health. Students will research topics in applied psychology corresponding to their academic and professional goals, and create projects to share this knowledge with their peers.

Course: RFLA  300 09                   
Instructor:  Rachel Simmons
Days/Times: TR, 9:30 - 10:45
Course Title:  Graphic Narratives

Prereq: Two RFLA 200 and WCMP

Course Description: What stories can you tell about your experiences as a Rollins student? How do these stories highlight the college mission of being a “global citizen and responsible leader”? This course asks you to research and create a visual narrative that explores the meaning of your liberal art experience at Rollins College.