Rollins Foundations in the Liberal Arts

Identity

The study of identity is fundamentally the study of context.  Examine the communities and networks that shape the ways that we exist in and interact with the world around us. Analyze these intersections between self and community, we will come to understand how people of diverse backgrounds impact, and are impacted by, the larger social, cultural, natural, and physical networks of which we all are a part. Be empowered to take meaningful and responsible action as citizens of the world – a goal that is central to our College’s overarching mission.

Identity

Identity

Be empowered to take meaningful and responsible action as citizens of the world – a goal that is central to our College’s overarching mission.

Fall 2019 - Identity Themed Seminar Courses

Expressive Arts Courses

Expressive Arts Courses

200 level

Instructor: Dawn Roe

Course Title: Conceptual Documentary Practice
Course Number: RFLA 200A 03-CRN#90390
Offered: T 8:00 - 10:45 a.m.

Themes: Identity/Innovation

Course Description: 
This CE course offers students an opportunity to work with members of the Hannibal Square community by producing a series of documentary-style images that reflect upon the impact of gentrification within the neighborhood. Students will consider the ethical implications inherent to photographic projects concerned with the politics of representation.  Course fee $50.

Course Instructor: Eric Zivot

Course Title: The Ethics of Arthur Miller
Course Number: RFLA 200A 04-CRN#90391
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50 p.m.
Themes: Enduring Questions/ Identity

Course Description: Arthur Miller combined social awareness with a searching concern for his character's inner lives.  In this course, we will be examining these inner lives and the ethical dilemmas that are revealed.  This class also fulfills the Ethics Competency

Instructor: Rachel Simmons

Course Title: The Power of Print_CE
Course Number: RFLA 200A 06-CRN#90393
Offered: TR 9:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Themes: Identity/Innovation

Course Description: Explore the history and practice of printmaking as a tool for communicating new ideas across cultures.  From early Chinese writing to Gutenberg's moveable type, to the 1970's protest posters, the ability to share printed information has been instrumental in human expression.  Create your own revolution through the power of print.  Course fee $50. CE course

Instructor: Sunni Witmer

Course Title:  Global Popular Music
Course number:  RFLA 200A 07-CRN#90394
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50
Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description:   This course will explore how the popular music of various societies from around the world is created and transformed by musical influences from other societies and worldviews when they encounter and interact with one another. The homogenizing forces of globalization, specifically the global pop aesthetic, will also be explored. Students will examine the artistic, literary, cultural, and socioeconomic effects of global popular music. Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in music; the effects of globalization on cultural development; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from expressive cultural forms expanding around the world. 

Instructor: Marianne DiQuattro

Course Title: Culture Shock: Travel LIterature
Course Number: RFLA 200A 08-CRN#90395
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50

Theme(s): Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description: 
We explore the genre of travel writing and culture shock narratives, specifically what it feels like to visit foreign locales, to meet strangers, and to be suddenly immersed in alien cultures. We will examine how the genres of essay, novel, drama, creative non-fiction and film can represent different aspects of what "culture shock" feels like.  We will analyze in a seminar setting questions of nationhood, citizenship, culture, globalization, and cosmopolitanism. We will conclude by visiting Epcot Disney, and students will create their own travel narratives of the “countries” they visit. Students can choose to craft these narratives in any of the forms studied: essay, creative nonfiction, fiction, drama, or film.  Course Fee $125

Instructor: Nadia Garzon

Course Title: Theatre, Creativity, and Social Change
Course Number: RFLA 200A 10 - CRN#90834
Offered: T,R 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.
Themes: Identity/Enduring Questions

Course Description:
This CE course actively explores the use of performing and visual arts in activism and social change. Students will develop and execute a Community Arts project with a community organization. Students will do on-site work (this means students will work outside of class hours) and will prepare in class by doing research and activities related to their chosen project.

Social Sciences Courses

Social Sciences Courses

200 level

Instructor: Joshua Hammonds

Course Title: Body Language: The Biology of Human Communication
Course Number: RFLA 200C 02 - CRN# 90398
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50 p.m.

Theme(s): Enduring Questions/Identity

Course Description: This course will examine the ways in which human communication affects, and is affected by, processes that occur in our bodies. We will begin by learning about the anatomy of the brain, facial musculature, the nervous system, the endocrine system, and the immune system. We will then discuss how those and other body systems are implicated in a range of communicative phenomena, such as emotion, conflict, stress, relationship satisfaction, temperament, and sexual behavior. Counts as an elective in COM

Instructor: Andrew Luchner

Course Title: The Psychology of Stress
Course Number: RFLA 200C 04-CRN#90399
Offered: TR 9:30-10:45

Themes: Enduring Questions/Identity

Course Description: Stress seems to be everywhere, inescapable and negatively affecting the lives of everyone. What if there was a different way to understand stress?  This course provides students with the opportunity to reconsider from a psychological perspective what stress means, how it impacts us and others, and what we can do about it. Additionally, the course will introduce the practice of effective methods of stress awareness and reduction.

Instructor: Dexter Boniface

Course Title: The Rise and Fall of Democracies
Course Number: RFLA 200C 05-CRN#90400
Offered: MWF 12:00-12:50 P.M.

Theme(s): Enduring Questions, Identity

Course Description: Why do some countries democratize and others do not?  Why do some democracies flourish and others collapse?  This course seeks to answer these questions and to familiarize students with a few of the prominent theories and methods associated with the comparative study of democracy.  

Instructor: Leslie Poole

Course Title:  Identities and Conflict: the 1960's
Course Number: RFLA 200C 06-CRN#90401
Offered: TR  9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description:  This course will examine events, people, and grassroots uprisings in the United States that led to a number of collisions: Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, women's rights, gay rights, counterculture, and the rise of the environmental movement. The echoes of this era are still felt today, as evidenced in continuing debates about race, rights, and power in the twenty-first century. This turbulent era shaped the identity of the United States and of Americans today.

Instructor: Beni Balak

Course Title: Political Economics on YouTube
Course Number: RFLA 200 C11 - CRN# 90680
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Themes: Identity/Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Transdisciplinary course exploring economic themes portrayed in popular culture. We view a diverse selection of media (selected by students as well as the professor), discuss the economic issues, uncover ideologies and rhetorical tools, and analyze the artistry used to convey them. Students will become amateur critics and creators, and learn to recognize, analyze, and express the political-economic polemics and debates at the heart of pop culture.

Humanities courses

Humanities courses

200 level

Instructor: Jill Jones

Course Title: Breaking Bad and the American Dream
Course Number: RFLA 200H 04-CRN#90408
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Theme(s): Enduring Questions, Identity

Course Description:  Breaking Bad and the Great American Novel This course will examine the series, Breaking Bad, alongside American literature and culture. We will discuss the ways in which the texts present and interrogate the American Dream, individual choice, masculinity and the moral code of society.

We will examine Walter White in the context of American literature to see if he is a particularly American (anti) hero, and to ask what his story—and its popularity in our culture—tells us about contemporary American society. We’ll ask questions: is Breaking Bad a dark comedy? Does it reify or undercut the uber-masculine hero culture? What does it say about American society (the police, education, health care, the middle class, white entitlement)? Is Walt a villain, a hero, a cautionary tale? We’ll draw conclusions (I don’t know what they are yet).

And we’ll place Breaking Bad into a larger context of literature and culture. Students will need to be prepared to do some heavy reading and even heavier “binge viewing.” A Netflix account is required.

Instructor: Jim Driggers

Course Title:  Queered Landscapes: Identity and Community in Transition
Course Number: RFLA 200H 05-CRN#90409
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description: The course includes the study of selected works by and about bisexual, gay, lesbian and transgender individuals. Representative works discussed are chosen to illustrate portrayals of individual identity and life as well as political and changes in the GLBTQ community over time -- from a period of "invisibility," through the AIDS crisis, into the present, looking at the struggles unique to each generation. Prereqs: ENG 140.

Instructor: Stacey L. Coffman-Rosen

Course Title:  Disabilities, Bodies, and Identities
Course Number: RFLA 200H 07-CRN#90411
Offered: TR 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.

Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description:  How do we relate to bodies, minds, and identities that are different than our own, and how does that determine our place in a changing society? In this course, we will critically examine how disabilities, bodies, and identities overlap and determine how we interpret and occupy bodies in intersecting categories. Course topics include but are not limited to: media and disability; becoming disabled; disability, race, gender, and sexual orientation; Deafness and Deaf culture; aesthetics and fashion; disability and sports; and outsider sexuality. You will examine your own body politic and the bodies of others. Course readings will be supplemented with film, cultural artifacts, personal writing, and interactive projects.  Counts as an elective in the CMC Major.

Instructor: Steven Schoen

Course Title: Media and Violence
Course Number: RFLA 200H 08-CRN#90412
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45

Themes: Enduring Questions/Identity

Course Description: We are awash today in media depictions of violence – from film, TV and video games to sports and social media. Why does violence gather audiences so effectively, and seem so thoroughly woven into our entertainment and imaginations? We will consider theories about violence and non-violence; consider depictions of violence in media forms ranging from film and TV programs to social media and news; and examine genres ranging from Hollywood blockbusters to sports, journalism, viral web videos, and political discourse. SWAG elective.

Instructor: Alberto Prieto-Calixto

Course Title: Spanish Identity Through the Lens   
Course Number: RFLA 200 H 09-CRN#90413
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m. 

Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description: The course explores the ways in which the Spanish identity has been shaped as a body of people who speak the same language. Through the analysis of various visual materials; films, documentaries, news media, popular culture artifacts, etc, this course examines how the Spanish speaking world defines its diverse ethnic, religious, cultural and national identities and how these identities have been created, revised and used.

Instructor: Abeer Aloush

Course Title: Middle East Societies and Identity
Course Number: RFLA 200H 11 - CRN#90832
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Theme: Identity

Course Description:The course is designed to discuss the very idea of the Middle East and North Africa as a historical and cultural construct, for which there are many different definitions. The class is designed to be an introduction to the region as whole; we will explore its internal diversity and dynamics that lead to different identities. Also, students will get exposed to a variety of ethnics, minority complexity, ideologies, religious struggle, multiculturalism, different languages, Arabic calligraphy as a reproduction of different schools of thought, and food as a reflection of identity.

Natural Sciences Courses

Natural Sciences Courses

200 level

Instructor: Kathryn Sutherland

Course Title:  Ecology of Environmental Issues 
Course Number: RFLA 200S 03-CRN#90416
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50; Lab T 8:00 - 10:45

Theme:  Environments/Identity 

Course Description: The current global human population exceeds 7.6 billion.  The exponential growth of our species is triggering a global environmental crisis by depleting land and water resources essential to the sustained survival of human and wildlife populations.  This course will introduce you to the biological and ecological principles that form the basis for understanding current environmental issues: population growth, loss of species diversity, resource limitation, pollution, and global climate change.   You will be exposed to the diversity of species and habitats on Earth while learning about the role of biology and ecology in the conservation of these valuable resources.  As a global citizen, you should understand the scientific principles that underlie the conservation issues facing the world today. Through observations and analyses in the classroom, field, and laboratory, you will become equipped with the knowledge necessary to make informed lifestyle decisions that have a positive impact on the conservation of local and global environmental resources.  

Instructor: Suzanne Woodward

Course Title: Identity and the Social Self
Course Number: RFLA 200S 07-CRN#90420
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50; Lab F 1:00 - 3:00
Theme: Identity

Course Description: Identity and the Social Self will be an in-depth examination of research and theory in social psychology related to such topics as gender norms related to helping behavior, court accuracy of eyewitnesses, treatment of stress and illness, the role of evolution and culture in attraction, prejudice and social inequalities, and conformity and obedience.  Our sense of self is formed in part by our social interactions.  This course will explore how our social groups inform and create out individual identities.

300 Level Courses

300 Level Courses

300 level

Course Instructor: Gregory Cavenaugh

Course Title: Performance of Modern Ritual
Course Number: RFLA 300 02-CRN#90422
Themes: Enduring Questions/Identity

Course Description: Ritual lies at the intersection of the symbolic and the transformative.  A wedding ritual, for instance, is both an attempt to symbolize ideals and a speech act that produces a married couple.  This performance-based course explores how ritual functions in contemporary Westernized cultures to create, sustain, and transform identities

300 level

Instructor: Lucy Littler

Course Title:  Racial Fictions
Course Number:  RFLA 300 03-CRN#90423
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45

Themes:  Environments/ Identity

Course Description: Is race fact or fiction? Like a novel, is "race" is designed to draw audiences in and solicit their belief in its version of the truth? Or is it more than a story? Is race a reality that meaningfully impacts individuals, communities, and ideologies? Rooted in the study of 20 c. American literature/culture and using multiple disciplinary lenses to enrich our examination, our course will consider these compelling questions not only how we answer, but also the ethical implications and consequences of asking, and what we do with our developing perspectives. This course examines these questions through the following Foundations themes: Identity and Environments and satisfies the ECMP.

300 level

Course Instructor: Maurice O'Sullivan

Course Title: Sex, Drugs, & Rock N Roll: Surviving the 1960s (By Someone Who Survived Them)
Course Number: RFLA 300 04 - CRN#90424
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Theme(s: Identity/Cultural Collisions

Course Description: How did the 1960s become a mythic decade? From JFK and LBJ to Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, from the Beatles and Bob Dylan to the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix, the 60s changed America. Or did it? In January 1960, your professor was a high school sophomore fascinated by Latin and Greek who believed that McSorley's Old Ale House in the East Village was the center of the universe. By December 1969, after leading New Jersey's largest civil rights youth group, playing varsity basketball in England, working as a jail guard, clubbing in the Soviet Union, and racing camels around the pyramids, he was a brand new Ph.D. teaching at Ohio State University and wondering how so much promise had collapsed.

Instructor: Suni Witmer

Course Title:  Music and Politics in the Americas
Course Number:  RFLA 300 05-CRN#90425; RFLA 300 06-CRN#90426
Offered: TR 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.; or TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Theme):  Identity/Cultural Collision

Course Description: This course focuses on the role music has played, and continues to play, in influencing and defining political and social justice movements throughout the diverse societies of the Americas.  Theoretical constructs such as nationalism, identity, ethnicity, race, and class, and their intersections, as they relate to music, will be examined.  The purpose of this course is to serve as an introduction to and survey of the music and the Americas in a political context, specifically the relationship between the political movements in Latin America and those in the United States.  Discourse will focus on the relationship of music to nation-state building and social justice movements.   Satisfies ECMP requirement.

300 level

Course Instructor: Jennifer Cavenaugh and Meredith Hein

Course Title: The Practice of Social Justice: Performing Resistance_CE
Course Number: RFLA 300 07-CRN#90427
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Themes: Enduring Questions/Identity

Course Description: This course asks students to reflect on how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof) and then asks them to identify and analyze systems of oppression at work in their own community. Finally, it empowers them with tools to create a specific positive social action to address a problem they have identified in their community. The course will also utilize the techniques of Augusto Boal's "Theater of the Oppressed" to empower students to address one aspect of oppression through community-based advocacy or activism. As part of this class, you will engage in community-based experiences through service-learning projects and individual engagement with local community organizations, using your previous skills and knowledge to address one of the community partner's needs. In addition to taking your learning outside of the classroom and engaging with local community organizations, you will also reflect on how you would like to put your knowledge to use after graduation. CE course

300-level

Instructor: Nadia Garzon

Course Title: Image and Forum Theater
Course Number: RFLA 300 09-CRN#90429
Offered: TR 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.
Themes: Identity/Enduring Questions

Course Description:  This course surveys Augusto Boal's Theater of the Oppressed, a technique developed for actors and non-actors alike, which seeks to give back the means of artistic production to the people. We will explore oppression in our lives and will use Image and Forum Theater among other tools to investigate and process our experiences. This is a hands-on lab, which means that students will participate in theater games and exercises and will be part of a performance piece. MWMP and WCMP competencies