Rollins Foundations in the Liberal Arts

Cultural Collision

Examine the scientific, artistic, literary, cultural, and socioeconomic dimensions of our evolving world. Think strategically and act ethically abouy your roles.  Develop the capacity to analyze issues with multiple complexities and develop nuanced perspectives.  Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in religion, music, and philosophy; the effects of globalization on humanity and the natural world; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from societal, and natural migrations around the world.

Cultural Collision

Cultural Collision

Students develop the capacity to analyze issues with multiple complexities and develop nuanced perspectives.  Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in religion, music, and philosophy; the effects of globalization on humanity and the natural world; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from societal, and natural migrations around the world.

Fall 2019 Cultural Collision Themed Courses

Expressive Arts Courses

Expressive Arts Courses

200 Level courses

Instructor: Chuck Archard

Course Title: One Hit Wonders
Course number: RFLA 200A 01 - CRN# 90388
Offered: T,R 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.
Theme: Cultural Collision


Course Description: Why do some artists or bands have a long career and others are merely “One Hit Wonders”? Is Pop music designed to be disposable and ephemeral? This course will examine the unpredictability of the music industry and unravel many of the factors that influenced the creation of Pop hits from the 1970s to the present. Many of the factors explored in class will include talent versus looks, digital recording, the corporatization of record labels, sampling, global communication, streaming, social media and behavioral targeting, as well as the overall zeitgeist of each era. We will also delve into the formulaic songwriting techniques used to create the perfect three-minute “Ear Candy” pop masterpiece.

Instructor: Sunni Witmer

Course Title:  Global Popular Music
Course number:  RFLA 200 A7 - CRN# 90394
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50 p.m.
Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description:  
This course will explore how the popular music of various societies from around the world is created and transformed by musical influences from other societies and worldviews when they encounter and interact with one another. The homogenizing forces of globalization, specifically the global pop aesthetic, will also be explored. Students will examine the artistic, literary, cultural, and socioeconomic effects of global popular music. Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in music; the effects of globalization on cultural development; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from expressive cultural forms expanding around the world.

Instructor: Marianne DiQuattro

Course Title: Culture Shock: Travel LIterature
Course Number: RFLA 200 A8 - CRN# 90395
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50 p.m.

Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description:  
We explore the genre of travel writing and culture shock narratives, specifically what it feels like to visit foreign locales, to meet strangers, and to be suddenly immersed in alien cultures. We will examine how the genres of essay, novel, drama, creative non-fiction and film can represent different aspects of what “culture shock” feels like.  We will analyze in a seminar setting questions of nationhood, citizenship, culture, globalization, and cosmopolitanism. We will conclude by visiting Epcot Disney, and students will create their own travel narratives of the “countries” they visit. Students can choose to craft these narratives in any of the forms studied: essay, creative nonfiction, fiction, drama, or film. 

Instructor: Susan Lackman

Course Title: Global Music
Course Number: RFLA200 09 - CRN#90396
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision

Course description: Music and language are clues to what a culture deems important and how those within that society interact.  By studying music (and, to a lesser extent, curiosities of language) of world cultures, we can find points of universality as well as ways to understand The Other.

Social Sciences Courses

Social Sciences Courses

200 Level courses

Instructor: Stephanie Guittar-Gonzales

Course Title:  The Immigrant Experience
Course Number: RFLA 200 C1 - CRN# 90397
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description: 
This course examines immigration to the United States through a sociological lens, with attention to the social, political, and historical contexts of immigration and the relationships between migrants and existing institutions and identities. We will discuss immigration patterns across time, explore debates around assimilation, and immigration policy. Throughout the course, we will analyze the immigrant experience through an intersectional lens. 

Instructor: Leslie Poole

Course Title:  Identities and Conflict: the 1960's
Course Number: RFLA 200 C6 - CRN# 90401
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Theme(s): Cultural Collision/Environments

Course Description:  This course will examine events, people, and grassroots uprisings in the United States that led to a number of collisions: Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, women's rights, gay rights, counterculture, and the rise of the environmental movement. The echoes of this era are still felt today, as evidenced in continuing debates about race, rights, and power in the twenty-first century. This turbulent era shaped the identity of the United States and of Americans today.

Instructor: Zachary Gilmore

Course Title: Fantastic Archaeology
Course Number: RFLA 200 C7 - CRN# 90402
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Themes: Cultural Collision/Enduring Questions

Course Description: 
This course focuses on pseudoscientific and supernatural claims about the human past. Through in-depth analyses of archaeological frauds and popular alternative theories, students examine how archaeologists know what they claim to know. Students learn how to critically evaluate scientific evidence and explore the broader societal impacts of pseudoscientific arguments.

Course Instructor: Vince Melograno

Course Title: Sport in Perspective
Course Number: RFLA 200C 09 - CRN# 90690; RFLA 200C 10 - CRN# 90689

Course Offered: Section 1: T,R 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.; Section 2: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Sport, an integral part of everyday life, influences and shapes individual identities. Critics argue that the preoccupation with sport distracts people from societal inequities and economic turmoil. Is it better to keep people focused on the World Cup, Olympic Games, and the Super Bowl? While sport celebrates human values of freedom, justice, and courage, this assumption is at odds with reality. Sport is intimately related to power, control, and authority. The course will: (1) examine how sport functions in relation to and in conflict with personal values (adult-organized youth sport, school-based sport, worldwide club sport, virtues/exploitation of college athletes, professional sport as a monopoly, and intersection of sport with religion and politics); (2) analyze the interaction between culture and sport, ethical/moral decision making, effects of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, sexual preference, and disability on sport access and participation, and deviant rule breaking, violence, performance enhancement, hazing, and gambling; and (3) explore the interplay between sport and society worldwide (sport media revolution connecting countries through technology, international consumer marketing/retailing of sport equipment and apparel, migration from country to country of athletes, coaches, and officials, exchange of values reflecting various cultures, human rights violations, and Olympic economics versus nationalism).

Instructor: Beni Balak

Course Title: Political Economics on YouTube
Course Number: RFLA 200 C11 - CRN# 90680
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Themes: Identity/Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Transdisciplinary course exploring economic themes portrayed in popular culture. We view a diverse selection of media (selected by students as well as the professor), discuss the economic issues, uncover ideologies and rhetorical tools, and analyze the artistry used to convey them. Students will become amateur critics and creators, and learn to recognize, analyze, and express the political-economic polemics and debates at the heart of pop culture.

Humanities Courses

200 level courses

Instructor:  Anne Zimmerman

Course Title: Memoir as Literature
Course Number: RFLA 200H 01 - CRN#90404
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
Themes: Cultural Collision/Enduring Questions

Course Description:
“If you read, you’ll judge...look through my things, and figure me out.” —Kurt Cobain, *Journals* On April 8, 1994, an electrician discovered a gruesome scene at a luxurious Seattle mansion. Kurt Cobain was dead. Lead singer of the tremendously popular band Nirvana, Cobain’s suicide shocked the world and cementing his place as an American rock icon. When his *Journals* were published years later, many were hopeful for answers to questions he had left in the wake of his death. Can such personal writing provide readers with such insights? In this course, we will consider the concept of memoir: both as actual journals (published and not). In particular, we will examine the American Confessionalist movement as one marked by the tone of memoir, discussing the texts of major poets such as Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton. Furthermore, we will address how the concept of memoir influences other cultural texts, such as television, film, and social media.

Instructor: Elke Framson

Course Title:  Transcultural Competence
Course Number: RFLA 200H 03 - CRN# 90407
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Theme(s): Cultural Collision

Course Description: Our professional and social surroundings are increasingly transcultural and shaped by cultural and linguistic diversity. In addition, modern workplace demands and professional opportunities take many of us to countries where people speak a different language and have different culture standards. How can we learn to communicate appropriately and effectively with people from diverse cultural backgrounds? In this class, we will explore the links between culture, language and communication, analyze the challenges of intercultural interaction, and learn ways to overcome them. Our theoretical explorations will be supported by case studies of real-life scenarios as well as interactive games and activities. Students will gain a solid foundation for the development of intercultural sensitivity and transcultural competence, so that they can successfully communicate, operate, and co-operate in diverse settings at home and abroad.

Course Instructor: Stacey Rosen-Coffman

Course Title: Disability, Body, & Identity
Course Number: RFLA 200 H07 - CRN#90411
Offered: T,R 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.
Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description:
How do we relate to bodies, minds, and identities that are different than our own, and how does that determine our place in a changing society? In this course, we will examine how disabilities, bodies, and identities intersect and determine how we interpret and occupy bodies in intersecting categories. Course topics include: media and disability; becoming disabled; disability, race, gender, and sexual orientation; Deafness and Deaf culture; aesthetics and fashion; disability and sports; and “outsider” sexuality. You will examine your own "body politic," and the bodies of others. Course readings will be supplemented with film, cultural artifacts, personal writing, and interactive projects.

Instructor: Alberto Prieto-Calixto

Course Title: Spanish Identity Through the Lens   
Course Number: RFLA 200 H09 - CRN# 90413
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.

Themes: Cultural Collision, Identity

Course Description: The course explores the ways in which the Spanish identity has been shaped as a body of people who speak the same language. Through the analysis of various visual materials; films, documentaries, news media, popular culture artifacts, etc, this course examines how the Spanish speaking world defines its diverse ethnic, religious, cultural and national identities and how these identities have been created, revised and used.

Instructor:  David DiQuattro

Course Title:  Labor, Leisure, & Culture
Course Number: RFLA 200H 12- CRN#90833
Offered:  T,R 8:00 - 9:15 a.m.
Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course will examine several aspects of labor and leisure. Through the works of Josef Pieper, Wendell Berry and others it will raise questions such as the following: What is leisure and what is it for? How is leisure connected to what it means to be a human being? How do modern ideals of ‘busyness’ ‘usefulness’ ‘effciency’ and others present obstacles to the cultivation of meaningful leisure? Is the vice of sloth connected to boredom and inability to enjoy meaningful leisure more than it is connected to laziness? How is leisure important for stepping back from and critiquing cultural assumptions from within? What does it mean to be connected to a place, and to labor in a way that has regard for preserving that place? Through raising these questions we will gain insight into modernity and the fundamental changes in the rhythms and shape of human life it has wrought.

Science Courses

Science Courses

Instructor:  Paul Stephenson

Course Title: Ecology of Florida Ecosystems
Course Number: RFLA 200S 05 - CRN#90418
Offered:  MWF 12:00 - 12:50 p.m.
Themes: Cultural Collision/Environments

Course Description:
Florida is one of the most ecologically rich states in the U.S. with some of the most unique ecosystems in the world, containing a remarkable number of endemic species. Florida is so large that it spans three climate zones, and its ecosystems are adapted to frequent fires and floods. If it was not for the fact that it is surrounded by water on three sides, Florida would actually be a desert! Thus, it is no surprise that Florida was still largely a wilderness just 100 years ago. Wild Florida examines the interaction between humans and these natural ecosystems. From Florida’s emergence out of the ocean to settlement by Native Americans and first contact with Europeans on through the present day, how have these interactions shaped Florida’s past and how will they impact Florida’s future? We will focus particularly on plants, their biology, diversity, and their economic and social impact. We will also address issues confronting Florida today; rapid population growth, urban sprawl, water shortages, pollution, invasive species, global climate change, agricultural threats and what scientists and community activists can do to ensure a better future for Florida. Marjorie Stoneman Douglas wrote of ecological restoration in south Florida that….”The Everglades is a test. If we pass it, we get to keep the planet.” Today one could argue that the entire state of Florida poses a test for the preservation of biodiversity.

300 Level Cultural Collision Courses

300 Level Cultural Collision Courses

300 level

Instructor: Maurice O'Sullivan

Course Title: Surviving the 1960's
Course Number: RFLA 300 04 - CRN# 90424
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description: How did the 1960s become a mythic decade? From JFK and LBJ to Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, from the Beatles and Bob Dylan to the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix, the 60s changed America. Or did it? In January 1960, your professor was a high school sophomore fascinated by Latin and Greek who believed that McSorley's Old Ale House in the East Village was the center of the universe. By December 1969, after leading New Jersey's largest civil rights youth group, playing varsity basketball in England, working as a jail guard, clubbing in the Soviet Union, and racing camels around the pyramids, he was a brand new Ph.D. teaching at Ohio State University and wondering how so much promise had collapsed.

Instructor: Sunni Witmer
Course Title: Music & Politics: The Americas
Course Numbers: RFLA 300 05 - CRN#90425; RFLA 300 06 - CRN#90426
Offered: T,R 8:00 - 9:15; T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Themes: Cultural Collision/Identity

Course Description: This course focuses on the role music has played, and continues to play, in influencing and defining political and social justice movements throughout the diverse societies of the Americas. Theoretical constructs such as nationalism, identity, ethnicity, race, and class, and their intersections, as they relate to music, will be examined. The purpose of this course is to serve as an introduction to and survey of the music of the Americas in a political context, specifically the relationship between the political movements in Latin America and those in the United States. Discourse will focus on the relationship of music to nation-state building and social justice movements. This course will explore how the music of various societies from within the Americas creates and transforms political world views. The homogenizing forces of globalization (and their backlash), specifically the mass-mediation of political movements, will also be explored. Students will examine the artistic, literary, cultural, and socio-economic effects of music in a socio-political context. Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in music; the effects of globalization on socio-political cultural development; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from expressive cultural forms expanding throughout the Americas.

Instructors:  Jennifer Cavenaugh and Meredith Hein

Course Title: Practicing Social Justice_CE
Course Number: RFLA 300 07 - CRN# 90427
Offered: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Theme: Cultural Collision

Course Description: This course asks students to reflect on how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof) and then asks them to identify and analyze systems of oppression at work in their own community. Finally, it empowers them with tools to create a specific positive social action to address a problem they have identified in their community. Students will build upon their previous IMW coursework to create an autobiography that explores how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof). The course will then utilize the techniques of Augusto Boal's "Theater of the Oppressed" to empower students to address one aspect of oppression through community-based advocacy or activism. As part of this class, you will engage in community-based experiences through service-learning projects and individual engagement with local community organizations, using your previous skills and knowledge to address one of the community partner’s needs. In addition to taking your learning outside of the classroom and engaging with local community organizations, you will also reflect on how you would like to put your knowledge to use after graduation. MCMP and WCMP.  This is a CE course.

Instructor: Sheri Boyd

Course Title: Social Choice Mathematics
Course Number: RFLA 300 10 - CRN# 90421
Offered: MWF 12:00 - 12:50
Theme: Cultural Collision/ Enduring Questions

Course Description: How do different societies choose their leaders? What roles do tradition and ideology play in the structure of government? We will research and compare voting systems and representative legislatures from around the world, applying principles of voting theory and fair division to study the ways diverse groups of people select and empower their leaders. 

Instructor: Susan Lackman

Course Title: Cracking the Tower of Babel
Course Number: RFLA 300 11- CRN #90687
Offered: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Themes: Cultural Collision/Innovation

Course Description: A truism is false: Music is NOT a universal language. Music and language are artifacts of specific cultures, influenced by materials and more. Yet, some instruments travel thousands of miles to be adopted by other cultures, and some people create instruments that duplicate those on the other side of the globe. Explore how creativity and innovation elevate society.