Rollins Foundations in the Liberal Arts

Cultural Collision

Examine the scientific, artistic, literary, cultural, and socioeconomic dimensions of our evolving world. Think strategically and act ethically abouy your roles.  Develop the capacity to analyze issues with multiple complexities and develop nuanced perspectives.  Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in religion, music, and philosophy; the effects of globalization on humanity and the natural world; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from societal, and natural migrations around the world.

Cultural Collision

Students develop the capacity to analyze issues with multiple complexities and develop nuanced perspectives.  Topics of inquiry and exploration include hybridity and diversity in religion, music, and philosophy; the effects of globalization on humanity and the natural world; and the social, political, and cultural ramifications resulting from societal, and natural migrations around the world.

Spring 2019 - Cultural Collision Themed Courses

100 level cultural collision themed courses

100 level cultural collision themed courses

Expressive Arts

Eric Zivot

Shakespeare's A.R.S.E
Transcript Title: Shakespeare's A.R.S.E.
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s):  Cultural Collision and Enduring Questions

Coure Description: 
Why would anyone care what Shakespeare had to say 400 years ago? What is it about these plays that allows them to be produced today? The plays allow us to examine some of the most difficult and perhaps intractable problems we face. Who's world will this be; the young or old? Do brown lives matter? Are opportunities equally available to men and woman or does gender dictate destiny?  

Hilary Cooperman

Rap and Revolution of the Middle East
Transcript Title: Perf&Culture of the Middle East
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets: section 1 meets TR 8:00 - 9:15; section 2 meets TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collison and Enduring Questions

Course Description:
This course explores the socio-cultural politics of life in the Middle East primarily through popular forms of artistic expression such as rap and hip-hop. Through these related forms and others, including visual art and drama, we examine stereotypical assumptions about Arabs and the Middle East that continue to reproduce orientalist and colonial perspectives still today.  As an expressive arts course, we will also try our own hand at writing rap lyrics and performing them! Prior experience welcome, but not required. Course fee $25.

Nadia Garzon

Theatre, Creativity & Social Change 
Transcript Title: Theatre, Creativity & Social Change 
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets TR 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s) Cultural Collision and Enduring Questions

Course Description:
This laboratory is an invitation to explore creativity through the use of various artistic languages and theater tools. Discover your innate creative self; explore the use of theater tools for personal and social transformation; survey theater in different social and historical contexts; and discover ways to apply theater tools to your life and the world today. This course explores theater techniques and works by Augusto Boal, Luis Valdez, Bertolt Brecht, and Enrique Buenaventura among others.

Marianne DiQuattro

Girl at War: Narratives of Global Conflict
Transcript Title: Girl at War: Narratives of Global Conflict
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Enduring Questions

Course Description:
The home front provides little in the way of sanctuary in the age of total war. In this course on 20th Century plays, novels, and film, we will critically read creative accounts of global conflicts, seeking to fill in between the lines of newspaper headlines and death tolls. 

Social Sciences (C)

Nolan Kline

Mysteries of Culture
Transcript Title: Mysteries of Culture
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Identity

Course Description:
In a globalizing world where people with different backgrounds, experiences, and worldviews are put into closer contact with one another, human contact may sometimes result in questions about cultural difference. This class explores concepts of culture and cultural difference, seeking to unmask cultural practices that may seem mysterious to some.

Hannah Ewing

Barbarians
Transcript Title: Barbarians
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Enduring Questions

Course Description:
Barbarians: we think mysterious, hairy, wild, violent people with no culture and who pose a threat to civilization itself. But what is a barbarian? Who determines barbarianism? And how do civilizations integrate strange and new peoples into their worldviews? This class examines literary and historical run-ins with ‘barbarians’ in Europe and the Middle East, from the ancient Greeks sneering at pants-wearing Persians, to Romans shocked by milk-drinking Britons, to the sheer terror inspired by the Germanic and Mongolian invasions, to the early modern European ideal of the ‘noble savage.’ By studying how dominant civilizations wrote about, imagined, and interacted with ‘barbarians,’ we question the ideas of civilization and barbarism, uncover truths about both parties, and explore the larger impact of the ‘civilized’ and the ‘primitive.’ This course will involve community engagement and real-world application of the ideas encountered in class.

Vincent Melograno

Sport in Perspective
Transcript Title: Sport in Perspective
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets: Section 1:  TR 8:00 - 9:15; Section 2: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Enduring Questions

Course Description:
Sport, an integral part of everyday life, influences and shapes individual identities. Critics argue that the preoccupation with sport distracts people from societal inequities and economic turmoil. Is it better to keep people focused on the World Cup, Olympic Games, and Super Bowl? While sport celebrates human values of freedom, justice, and courage, this assumption is at odds with reality. Sport is intimately related to power, control, and authority. The course will: (1) examine how sport functions in relation to and in conflict with personal values (adult-organized youth sport, school-based sport, worldwide club sport, virtues/exploitation of college athletes, professional sport as a monopoly, and intersection of sport with religion and politics); (2) analyze the interaction between culture and sport, ethical/moral decision making, effects of race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, sexual preference, and disability on sport access and participation, and deviant rule breaking, violence, performance enhancement, hazing, and gambling; and (3) explore the interplay between sport and society worldwide (sport media revolution connecting countries through technology, international consumer marketing/retailing of sport equipment and apparel, migration from country to country of athletes, coaches, and officials, exchange of values reflecting various cultures, human rights violations, and Olympic economics versus nationalism).

 

Chelsea Ebin

Politics in America: The Perils and Promises of Pluralism
Transcript Title: Politics in America
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
As American politics has become increasingly polarized, questions about the influence of identity within the electorate have taken center stage. Whether the focus is on white blue-collar voters or undocumented immigrants, women or evangelical Protestants, identity is seen as central to the production of conflicting political ideologies. At the same time, American society and political institutions are valued for being pluralistic and representative of a diverse populace. Pluralism offers both the political promise of resolving difference and the peril of encouraging political divisions. This course asks students to reflect on the relationship of identity to the practice of American politics. Students will survey a range of identity-based and intersectional movements in the American electorate and consider how the principles and practices of pluralism work in contemporary American politics.

Humanities (H)

Denise Cummings

Native American Media & Culture
Transcript Title: Native American Media & Culture
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets:   TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Identity

Course Description:
Through critical analysis of representation and the ways Native- and non-Native-created texts (film, digital video, television, radio, print media, art, literature) have contributed to the construction of racial and ethnic identities, this course specifically addresses how contemporary Indigenous peoples reclaim textual production to (in)form identity, reconstruct the past, revitalize culture, and assert sovereignty and treaty rights. Course foundations address American Indian prehistory, the European colonial period, and the American period of American Indian history and experience. The course broadly confronts how a variety of media texts and traditions intersect with questions of race, ethnicity, and other identity categories, how such texts have engaged with diversity and marginalization, class and inequality, and how they may affect identity formations and relations. Assignments address the demonstration of information and media literacies and written competencies. Students will also create short video diaries—expressive autobiographical pieces exploring some aspect of their own identities and/or experiences.

Lisa Tillmann

Memory, Empathy & Creativity
Transcript Title: Memory, Empathy & Creativity
Course Number: rFLA100H
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Innovation and Cultural Collision

Course Description: 
In this course, we will write creatively and powerfully about transformational experiences in our own lives and in others' lives. This class is for anyone who yearns to read and write in order to understand and bring meaning to life's heartache, joy, frustration, wonder, injustice, anxiety, and love.

Todd French

Extremes in Religion
Transcript Title: Extremes in Religion
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets: Section 1: TR 8:00 - 9:15; Section 2:  TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Identity

Course Description:
Ranging from body modification to glorification of the perfect virginal form; abject poverty to extraordinary wealth; rolling saints to popes and bishops; megachurches to monastic retreats; and selfless love to imposed terror— Religion has mapped an array of extremes onto various cultures throughout world history. This course will begin by seeking instances of extreme religious behavior and ask how these movements have become normative in various communities. Determining why and when religious practice progresses from passion and devotion to that which our society deems “extreme,” we will explore what narratives are employed to maintain the feverish pitch of holy otherness. Restraining simple criticisms of those actions that are not in harmony with personal experiences, the student will search for motivating.

 

Mindful Activism
Transcript Title: Mindful Activism
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Mindfulness involves remaining present, grounded, and non-reactive, even in the most intense circumstances such as when engaging in activism and social change.  Impactful social movements have been crucial in advancing peace and justice in our own society and around the world.  How are they organized?  What roles do activists play in at various stages in a movement and how can we mindfully navigate this work?  In this experiential course, we will examine several important social movements, theories and concepts linked to their success, and what we can learn and apply in developing  activist campaigns to address some of the most pressing contemporary social justice issues, such as gender-based violence, immigrant rights, and lgbtq+ rights.  As a developing activist, you will identify your own strengths and challenges and engage in experiences, including the cultivation of mindfulness as the foundation of social justice work, that promote your growth and effectiveness in this work. 

200 level cultural collision themed courses

200 level cultural collision themed courses

Expressive Arts (A)

Kristin Winet

Graphic Travel Memoirs
Transcript Title: Graphic Travel Memoirs
Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: TR 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Identity

Course Description:
In this class, we will think about the concept of the "sketch" as it pertains to travel. In art and in writing, a sketch is a brief rendering that captures the essence of something. In this course, we will be writing and thinking through the sketches of our travels. 

Sunni Witmer

Latin American Expressive Arts
Transcript Title: Lat Amer Express Arts

Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: TR 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course is an integrated study of the expressive cultures of Latin America, with an emphasis on the role the arts play in social life. Topics include pre-Columbian art; modernist arts; Spanish American and Brazilian narrative; Latin American poetry, architecture, music, theatre, cinema, and popular culture; and Latinx culture.

Ryan Winet

Writing About Photographs
Transcript Title: Writing About Photographs

Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: TR 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Environment

Course Description:
No matter how beautiful a photograph or painting may be, it remains silent to us. In this class, we will write short stories and poems to give pictures the stories they couldn’t tell themselves. We will visit CFAM and use the visual arts as inspiration for the literary arts.

Social Sciences (C)

Sarah Parsloe

Latin American Expressive Arts
Transcript Title: Lat Amer Express Arts

Course Number: rFLA 200C
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course explores how we communicate to (re)create embodied identities, producing and resisting cultural definitions of "normalcy."  We will focus on specific embodied experiences, iincluding illness, injury, disability, fatness, queerness, and race.  We will also consider how people respond to identity threats,including their own changing, unpredictable bodies.

Shan-Estelle Brown

The Patient Experience
Transcript Title: The Patient Experience
Course Number: rFLA 200C
Meets: TR 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Innovation

Course Description:
Each of us will be a medical patient at some point in our lives or a caregiver for someone else, and these experiences can be stressful, intimidating, and even discriminatory. This course examines critical issues and tensions between providers and patients in the US medical system in order to design a more equitable, healthier future.

Quo Vadis, Europe?
Transcript Title: Quo Vadis, Europe?

Course Number: rFLA 200C
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course covers the European countries’ economic development after WWII to the present day. In doing so it presents an economic framework for understanding the historical past and the change following the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989. The focus will be placed on the interconnectedness among various European economies situated in the Eastern and Western parts of the European continent, and their interactions within the international economy.

 

Yusheng Yao

China's Rise
Transcript Title: China's Rise

Course Number: rFLA 200C
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course examines the causes, process and effects of China's rise in the past three decades and its implications to international politics and economics.  China's rise will be explored in the historical context of China's modern transformation including the Western challenges, rise of nationalism, search for modern identity, and success and failure of communist revolution under Mao Zedong.

Humanities (H)

Self & Otherness in World Music
Transcript Title: Self & Otherness in World Music

Course Number: rFLA 200H
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Is music a universal language?  If yes, where is semantics?  If not, why Gangnam Style and some other "ethnic" music enjoy huge popularity across cultures?  While musical expression is a common human behavior, the meaning of it is often culturally specific.  In this course, we will explore the cognitive and semiotic aspects of music and their role in shaping our cultural perception of identity.  In particular, we will look at some important trends in world music (a mass-mediate, cross-cultural evolving popular music genre) and examine how accelerated transnational movements of people, ideas, capital, and information cross-fertilized music making and blurred cultural boundaries. 

This course will use music, a metaphor of social and cultural processes, to explore fluid and pre-mutational traits of human identity in a global music exchange context.  It will challenge old habits of thinking about ethnic, religious, and cultural identities, and illustrate how cross-cultural musical engagement can reinforce cultural affinity and create hybrid expression.

Jana Mathews & Ben Hudson

The Italian Imaginary
Transcript Title: English Lit & Italy 1600 - 1900

Course Number: rFLA 200H
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

 

Course Description:
Shakespeare probably never visited Italy, and Byron and Shelley only briefly vacationed there, but these writers' shared love affair with the country is well documented in the combined portfolio of plays, novels and stories that are set there. In this field study to Milan and Venice, we will analyze the ways in which the idea of Italy serves as a projection of the English literary imagination and how that fantasy works to construct individual, communal, and national identities. Activities include archival research at local institutions and visits to museums, cathedrals, historic casinos and asylums.

Amy Parziale

Intergenerational Trauma in Literature and Film
Transcript Title: Trauma in Lit and Film
Course Number: rFLA 200H
Meets: Section 1: MWF 9:00 - 9:50; Section 2: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description: 
Native American Gemma Benton wrote: Our ancestors knew that healing comes in cycles.  One generation carries the pain so the next can live and heal. This literature and film course examines the after-effects of cultural collisions like war, genocide, and imperialism by analyzing the representation of intergenerational trauma in literature and film. exts include: books I was the Child of Holocaust Survivors, Kindred, Dreaming in Cuban, and Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven; and films Waltz with Bashir and Return of Navajo Boy, as well as Kara Walker's video installations.  Our guiding questions will be: How is trauma passed between generations, and how it is represented?; and What are the ethical, cultural, and socio-political ramifications of both trauma and representation?  Concepts and contexts related to trauma, identity, nation-state, globalization, imperialism, class,gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and the humanities will be explored in depth.

Sciences (S)

Emily Nodine

Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes
Transcript Title: Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes
Course Number: rFLA 200S
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Identity and Environments

Course Description: 
Florida's unique position in the landscape and underlying geology result in a delicate mosaic of interacting land and water that has been affected by little but the rise and fall of sea level for millions of years... until humans came along. People as early as the native Americans have tried to tame Florida's wilderness and reshape the landscape to suit their own needs. Following European colonization, people largely succeeded at reclaiming its wetlands for their own purposes, realizing only recently that doing so threatens the natural systems and creatures that we too depend upon. Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes examines the natural processes of Florida ecosystems, with a focus on wetlands and waterways, to evaluate how human influence has altered diverse habitats, how it might be employed to repair them, and how we might forge a path toward co-existence in this landscape.

300 level cultural collision themed courses

Nadia Garzon

Arts, Community, and Activism_CE
Transcript Title: Community Arts and Activism
Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Enduring Questions

Course Description: 
This CE course actively explores the use of performing and visual arts in activism and social change. Students will develop and execute a Community Arts project with a community organization. Students will do on-site work (this means you will work outside of class hours) and will prepare in class by doing research and activities related to their chosen project. No books-$25 fee.

Nadia Garzon

Cracking the Tower of Babel: Music and Language, the Key to Global Understanding
Transcript Title: Cracking the Tower of Babel
Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision

Course Description: 
A truism is false: Music is NOT a universal language. Music and language are artifacts of specific cultures, influenced by materials and mores. Yet, some instruments travel thousands of miles to be adopted by other

Hilary Cooperman

Refugees of the Middle East Performance Lab
Transcript Title: RefugeesoftheMiddleEastPerfLab
Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: MW 8:30 - 9:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision and Identity

Course Description: 
Amidst news headlines that broadcast war, oil and extremism, the real lives of people living in the Middle East remain shrouded in mystery.  What does a Yemeni teenager feel and think about?  What about a young Egyptian student who one day, wakes and finds her country on the verge of revolution?  This course uncovers often overlooked personal narratives and experiences of life in the Middle East today through artistic practices such as rap music, visual arts, and poetry.

 

Hesham Mesbah

Global Journalism
Transcript Title: Global Journalism
Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Cultural Collision

Course Description: 
This class is about global news, global media organizations and networks, and global issues presented in specific global media outlets. Students will analyze news in the global press, explore the historical, legal, ethical, and political contexts of those news outlets, and critique theories and effects of globalization.

WritingBooksfor(&with)Child_CE
Transcript Title: WritingBooksfor(&with)Child_CE
Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Innovation and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Students will study the craft within picture books and create their own books for (and with) children.  A highlight of the semester will be a month-long immersion at the Rollins College Child Development Center, where students will collaborate with a child to co-author a picture book: the partners will design the narrative together, the child will create the artwork, and the student will craft the prose and assemble the project, which will be displayed for the entire Rollins community.  Then, for their Foundations Summit project, students will create a second picture book (fiction or nonfiction) for children that explores a facet of their major or a concept from an earlier rFLA course.

Fall 2018

FALL 2018 COURSES

FALL 2018 COURSES

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Rachel Simmons

Power of Print (Thursdays 8 - 10:45)
Transcript Title: Power of Print_CE
Course Number: WCC200A.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

This course explores the history and practice of printmaking as a tool for communicating new ideas across time and space, cultures and nations. From early Chinese writing and art, to Gutenberg's invention of movable type, to today’s activist writers and artists, the ability to reproduce and share printed information has been instrumental in forming communities, movements and even revolutions. This course challenges students to understand the power of print through the experience of designing and printing letterpress posters for a local not-for-profit organization.

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Susan Lackman

Global Music
Transcript Title: Global Music
Course Number: WCC200A.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course
Music and language are clues to what a culture deems important and how those within that society interact.  By studying music (and, to a lesser extent, curiosities of language) of world cultures, we can find points of universality as well as ways to understand The Other.

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Sunni Witmer

Global Pop
Transcript Title: Global Pop
Course Number: WCC200A.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

The pop music aesthetic, which began in the 1960s in the US and Britain, has moved to all corners of the globe. Topics include: the globalization of music; the commodification of culture; the role of music in politics; and, social diversity in pop music. No prior musical background required.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Ted Gournelos

Popular Culture and Society
Transcript Title: Popular Culture and Society
Course Number: WCC200C.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

This course is about taking a critical approach to popular culture. It is not so much about celebrating the pleasures or deriding the dangers, but instead continuously examining the limits and possibilities the media have to impact our lives. Throughout the semester we will learn a number of theories that can be helpful tools for better understanding, and then see how to apply them to various forms of popular culture (films, TV shows, news, magazines, music, fashion, sports).

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Rachel Newcomb

Food, Culture, and Social Justice_CE
Transcript Title: Food, Culture, Social Justice
Course Number: WCC200C.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

In this course, students will learn how food can be social, cultural, and political. We will consider issues such as food insecurity and food deserts, cultural identity and memory. Students will also conduct a community engagement project centered on local social movements that support fair and sustainable food production.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Anca Voicu

Quo Vadis, Europe?
Transcript Title: Quo Vadis, Europe?
Course Number: WCC200C.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

This course covers the European countries’ economic development after WWII to the present day. In doing so it presents an economic framework for understanding the historical past and the change following the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989. The focus will be placed on the interconnectedness among various European economies situated in the Eastern and Western parts of the European continent, and their interactions within the international economy.

HUMANITIES

Maurice O'Sullivan

Boys to Men:  The Challenge of Growing up Male in America
Transcript Title: Boys to Men:  The Challenge of Growing up Male in America
Course Number: WCC200H.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

Boyz to Men will explore the challenges of growing up male in America. We will use a variety of novels, films, and TV shows, from Huckleberry Finn and Catcher in the Rye to Boyhood and Sons of Anarchy, along with interviews and data from other disciplines to examine social and cultural assumptions about maleness and to try to define how to become a successful guy in today's world. Each student will conduct interviews in the community, keep a reflective journal, and write personal essays. Please note: this is not a course for anyone who simply wants to bash males as the source of all the world's evil or for anyone who thinks the world would be better if only males ran it.

HUMANITIES

Amy Parziale 

Intergenerational Trauma in Literature and Film
Transcript Title: Trauma in Lit & Film
Course Number: WCC200H.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

Native American Gemma Benton wrote: “Our ancestors knew that healing comes in cycles.  One generation carries the pain so the next can live and heal.” This literature and film course examines the after-effects of cultural collisions like war, genocide, and imperialism by analyzing the representation of intergenerational trauma in literature and film.  Texts include: books I was the Child of Holocaust Survivors, Kindred, Dreaming in Cuban, and Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven; and films Waltz with Bashir and Return of Navajo Boy, as well as Kara Walker's video installations.  Our guiding questions will be:  How is trauma passed between generations, and how it is represented?; and What are the ethical, cultural, and socio-political ramifications of both trauma and representation?  Concepts and contexts related to trauma, identity, nation-state, globalization, imperialism, class, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and the humanities will be explored in depth.

HUMANITIES

Rosana Diaz-Zambrana

Race, Class, and Gender in Latin America
Transcript Title: Race, Class, and Gender in Latin America
Course Number: WCC200H.4
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

This course will study the representation of gender, class, and race in Latin American literature culture, and cinema through the analysis of literary texts, films, art, and other cultural products. Given the diverse sociocultural construction of Latin America, this course will examine the ongoing effect of some of its most prevalent struggles, such as marginality, historical trauma, and exclusion, in shaping its societies and subjectivities past and present. We will also take an in-depth look at some of Latin America's cultural representations as a product of a complex intersection of national politics, ethnic identities, and social privilege in the context of a globalized world. Readings will include literary works by such writers as Rigoberta Menchú and Junot Diaz as well as perspectives on film and popular culture from figures such as Frida Kahlo, Shakira, and Celia Cruz.

SCIENCES

Fiona Harper

Oceans in Crisis
Transcript Title: Oceans in Crisis
Course Number: WCC200S.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course
Coastal nations such as the Seychelles are in danger of having their people become “environmental refugees” as a consequence of sea level rising. At the same time, climate change is causing the global sea temperatures to increase, the potential loss of species like the polar bear as the seas warm, and the loss of corals due to bleaching. Overfishing has reduced global fisheries to less than 10% of their original stock sizes in the last 100 years. Our increasing consumption of heavy metals for computers and cell phones has means we may begin mining the deep sea. Oceans in conflict examines the conflicts between human populations over the use of marine resources, and the impacts of human activities on marine ecosystems. The overall goal of this course is to understand how choices we make and small lifestyle changes can help reduce climate change and improve the health of our oceans, now and for the future.

SCIENCES

Bobby Fokidis

How to Connect the dots: Science and Pseudoscience
Transcript Title: Science and Pseudoscience
Course Number: WCC200S.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

Never in history has such unprecedented scientific knowledge been available. Yet discourse between the public, policiticians, and scientitsts has never been more at odds. This course explores scientific controversies and teaches the biological concepts needed to test the validity of pseudoscientific claims, such as conspiracies and myths about human health.

SCIENCES

Emily Nodine

Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes
Transcript Title: Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes
Course Number: WCC200S.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level rFLA course

Florida's unique position in the landscape and underlying geology result in a delicate mosaic of interacting land and water that has been affected by little but the rise and fall of sea level for millions of years... until humans came along. People as early as the native Americans have tried to tame Florida’s wilderness and reshape the landscape to suit their own needs. Following European colonization, people largely succeeded at “reclaiming” its wetlands for their own purposes, realizing only recently that doing so threatens the natural systems and creatures that we too depend upon. Springs, Swamps, and Sinkholes examines the natural processes of Florida ecosystems, with a focus on wetlands and waterways, to evaluate how human influence has altered diverse habitats, how it might be employed to repair them, and how we might forge a path toward co-existence in this landscape.

300-LEVEL COURSES

300-LEVEL COURSES

300 LEVEL

Barry Allen

America's Gifts
Transcript Title: America's Gifts
Course Number: WCC300.1
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP competencies. FCMP and third 200-level neighborhood course may be taken concurrently.

This course explores the uniquely American circumstances that gave rise to the development of jazz, baseball and National Parks. All of these icons of Americana exhibit many of the dynamic (and often conflicting) forces at work in American history. For example, the preservation of land in National Parks ran directly counter to the essentially materialistic and exploitative approach to nature that governed 19th century America. Jazz represents the collision of European and African musical forms, which produced an unprecedented opportunity for exploration and innovation. And (sadly), baseball is at odds with a contemporary American culture that is increasingly violent, impatient and overbearing. Underlying themes of the course include the roles of race, class, gender and capitalism, as well as the relationship between the individual and the group.

300 LEVEL

Ashley Kistler

Ethnography of Rollins
Transcript Title: Ethnography of Rollins
Course Number: WCC300.2
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP competencies. FCMP and third 200-level neighborhood course may be taken concurrently.

This course explores the intersections of cultures on Rollins’ campus and in Winter Park. Through class readings, discussions, and fieldwork, students will use ethnographic research methods to examine the cultures of Rollins, looking at cultural collisions within Rollins' student body, between students and other members of the Rollins community, within and between student organizations, and between Rollins and the Central Florida community. Students will take an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing the cultural collisions that have shaped and continue to shape life at Rollins. Students will use the skills that they learned in each of their neighborhood classes to look at the question of how and why cultures collide at Rollins and in Winter Park. This class is structured into two parts. During the first half of the semester, the class will meet regularly during our assigned class time to read literature about ethnographic field methods, high education, and culture collisions on college campuses.

Dr. Emily Russell
Rollins College
Associate Dean of Academics
1000 Holt Avenue - 2749
Winter Park, FL 32789
407.646.1340
AssocDeanAcademics@rollins.edu