Rollins Foundations in the Liberal Arts

Mysteries and Marvels

Uncovering the Unknown

Explore what we may not know about our world, our community, our friends and families, and ourselves. Watch preview video to learn more about this neighborhood.

FALL 2018

MYSTERIES AND MARVELS

Mysteries and Marvels

Jack the Ripper, climate change, Bigfoot, crime scenes, suicide bombers, peace building, pirates, the Third Reich, American politics, and one hit wonders: If you are drawn to big questions that do not have simple answers, Mysteries and Marvels is the neighborhood for you. As we find comfort in what we hold to be true, we remain fascinated by that which eludes us. This neighborhood invites students to explore what we may not know about our world, our community, our friends and families, and ourselves. Through a diverse array of courses, students will examine all kinds of mysteries— ranging from artistic marvels and scientific wonders to political and cultural blind spots—in order to acquire the skills necessary to unlock the enduring mysteries of the universe… or at least of contemporary college life.
FALL 2018 COURSES

FALL 2018 COURSES

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Chuck Archard

Musical One Hit Wonders
Transcript Title: Musical One Hit Wonders
Course Number: MM200A.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
Why do some artists or bands have a long career and others are merely “One Hit Wonders”? Is Pop music designed to be disposable and ephemeral? This course will examine the unpredictability of the music industry and unravel many of the factors that influenced the creation of Pop hits from the 1970s to the present. Many of the factors explored in class will include talent versus looks, digital recording, the corporatization of record labels, sampling, global communication, streaming, social media and behavioral targeting, as well as the overall zeitgeist of each era. We will also delve into the formulaic songwriting techniques used to create the perfect three-minute “Ear Candy” pop masterpiece.

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Abigail Getty

Musical One Hit Wonders
Transcript Title: Musical One Hit Wonders
Course Number: MM200A.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

Can art really change someone’s perspective? What does contemporary theatre have to teach us about some of the most controversial issues we face? What happens to an audience during a live performance? This class will examine whether theatre can open up our awareness of the people around us and help us gain a more global, inclusive perspective, as well as dissecting how the experience of being in a theatre is different from viewing a film or other piece of art. Students can expect to examine plays, musicals, and films, as well as attending live local performances.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Lee Lines

The Hidden Landscapes of Food in America
Transcript Title: The Hidden Landscapes of Food
Course Number: MM200C.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
Why do grocery stores in Florida sell orange juice from Brazil? Why do we grow iceberg lettuce in the desert Southwest? Is agriculture about more than simply producing food? Is industrial agriculture sustainable? Does “local” or “organic” really make a difference? This course considers the ways in which much of our food system is hidden from public view. Through class discussions and field-based projects we explore big picture questions related to the American diet, environmental sustainability, nutrition, crop diversity, and the transparency of the American food system.
   

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Zack Gilmore

Fantastik Archaeology: Science, Pseudoscience, and the Human Past
Transcript Title: Fantastik Archaeology
Course Number: MM200C.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

This course focuses on pseudoscientific and supernatural claims about the human past. Through in-depth analyses of archaeological frauds and popular alternative theories, students examine how archaeologists know what they claim to know. Students learn how to critically evaluate scientific evidence and explore the broader societal impacts of pseudoscientific arguments.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Josh Hammonds

Body Language:  The Biology of Human Communication
Transcript Title: Biology of Human Communication
Course Number: MM200C.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
A survey of the History of Medicine from Greek Antiquity to the present. This course pays particular attention to the Philosophical and Cultural presuppositions that undelay the practice of medicine. In addition to the historical narrative, will cover biographical details of historical figures such as Galen and William Harvey.

HUMANITIES

Emily Russell

Death in Culture
Transcript Title: Death in Culture
Course Number: MM200H.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

From tales of body snatchers to death photography to fictions of organ transplantation, this course explores the many ways we have imagined death in the West. Students will curate an exhibition for the Cornell Fine Arts Museum (Jan 2018).

HUMANITIES

Jason Schroepfer

Millenials in the Middle East
Transcript Title: Millenials in the Middle East
Course Number: MM200H.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

This course examines the Gothic genre in American literature as well as in pop culture, film and television. We will start by reading early  AmericanGothic tales, and move forward to the present, examining the genre from the female Gothic to the haunted house.  From Edgar Allan Poe to Beloved, from Rosemary's Baby to Get Out!, from Alcott's Gothic tales to Lifetime television or Pretty Little Liars, how does the genre evolve in Americanliterature and culture?  We will examine recurring themes and motifs and how they change, shift, morph with the culture and the shifting fears of the culture.  Themes will include the haunted house, possession, madness, evil husbands, evil governesses, evil children, and (mouhahahahah) murder.  We will attend Halloween Horror nights (thus the lab fee).  
]Students enrolled in this course are eligible to join me and Dr. Jana Mathews on a totally optional but super amazing early American history-themed weekend Immersion trip to Boston/Plymouth/Salem on October 18-21 (applications available in September)].

HUMANITIES

Jill Jones

Horror Stories in Film and Literature
Transcript Title: Horror in Film and Lit
Course Number: MM200H.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

This course will examine the horror genre in literature and film. We will read texts and view films in the horror genre, read some theoretical discussions of why we love to be scared (and why we don't--which seems like an easier question to answer), and what purpose the horror genre serves in society.    There will be some out-of-class expectations (film and television viewings) and a fairly heavy reading load at times. Your final project may involve making a short horror film, writing a horror story, or some other unusual project.

SCIENCES

Chris Fuse

Science of Superheroes
Transcript Title: Science of Superheroes
Course Number: MM200S.1
Prerequisites: MAT 112 or equivalent prepration and One 100-level Neighborhood course
Science fiction and fantasy characters and superheroes are today's modern myths. The cultural and economic impacts are obvious. Students will examine stories, movies, and characters to evaluate the scientific validity. Many comic books were written using the noteworthy science at the time, while stories utilized unfounded, but hopeful, scientific advances. Students will determine if the comic and movie science is reasonable. Additionally, they will explore the far-fetched "scientific" explanations some comic books and movies currently use to judge whether these may one day be a reality.

SCIENCES

Rachelle Yankelevitz

Dog is Love:  The Science of Human-Animal Interactions
Transcript Title: Human-Animal Interactions
Course Number: MM200S
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

Humankind has a special relationship with the dog. We consider dogs our best friends, yet we have a lot to learn about their abilities and preferences. In this course, we will study our canine companions, and other domesticated animals, in order to learn how to use the tools of science to reach objective, replicable conclusions that can improve the lives of humans and animals alike.

300 LEVEL

Jana Mathews

Pawn Stars
Transcript Title: Material Culture
Course Number: MM300
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP competencies. FCMP and third 200-level neighborhood course may be taken concurrently.

Our relationship with material objects is vexed. On one hand, we’ve been conditioned to see physical objects as temporary (“you can’t take it with you”); dangerous (“the things you own end up owning you”); and secondary in importance to the non-material (“the best things in life are free”). At the same time, studies have shown that we like stuff. A lot. This course mobilizes a suite of disciplinary lenses to take a close look at the relationship between people and objects over time and space, focusing particularly on the way that material culture works to shape and define conceptions of individual, communal and national identity. Topics include the secret histories of everyday objects; the psychology of collecting, hoarding and compulsive decluttering; the politics of display and dilemmas of classification; the economics of ritualistic consumption and thoughtless disposal; and the anatomy of mementos and souvenirs and inevitable “death of things.”

300 LEVEL

Sunni Witmer

The Role of Music in the Political and Social Justice Movements in the America
Transcript Title: Music & Politics in the Americas
Course Number: MM300.3
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP competencies. FCMP and third 200-level neighborhood course may be taken concurrently.

This course focuses on the role music has played, and continues to play, in influencing and defining political and social justice movements througout the diverse societies of the Americas.  Theoretical constructs such as nationalism, identity, ethnicity, race, and class, as they are related to music, will be examined.

Dr. Emily Russell
Rollins College
Associate Dean of Academics
1000 Holt Avenue - 2749
Winter Park, FL 32789
407.646.1340
AssocDeanAcademics@rollins.edu