Rollins Foundations in the Liberal Arts

Identity

Identity

The study of identity is fundamentally the study of context.  Examine the communities and networks that shape the ways that we exist in and interact with the world around us. Analyze these intersections between self and community, we will come to understand how people of diverse backgrounds impact, and are impacted by, the larger social, cultural, natural, and physical networks of which we all are a part. Be empowered to take meaningful and responsible action as citizens of the world – a goal that is central to our College’s overarching mission.

Spring 2019 - Identity Theme

The study of identity is fundamentally the study of context.  Examine the communities and networks that shape the ways that we exist in and interact with the world around us. Analyze these intersections between self and community, we will come to understand how people of diverse backgrounds impact, and are impacted by, the larger social, cultural, natural, and physical networks of which we all are a part. Be empowered to take meaningful and responsible action as citizens of the world – a goal that is central to our College’s overarching mission.
100 level Identity Seminars

100 level Identity Seminars

Expressive Arts (A)

Rachel Simmons

Visual Journals: Identity and Memory
Transcript Title: Visual Journals
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets: Tuesdays 8:00 - 10:45 AM
Theme(s):  Identity/Innovation

Course Description:
This course will examine identity and memory through the visual journal, a mixed media fusion of creative writing and art. Journaling is a practice of self-reflection that helps create meaning in our lives. Students will engage in memory-based writing activities, peer critiques and mixed media experiments. Visual Journals: Identity and Memory focus is on identity, its emphasis on defining selfhood and the mechanism of the journal as a tool for self-reflection. In addition to several others, will be addressing these questions from the neighborhood description: What does it mean to be human? Where do I belong? What can I do to make a positive impact on the world?   Additional fee for course:  $50.   Counts as MCMP and WCMP.

Dawn Roe

Digital Media as Critical Practice
Transcript Title: Dig Media Critical Practice
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets: Tuesdays 8:00 - 10:45 AM
Theme(s): Identity

Course Description:
This course introduces concepts and techniques of digital media as critical practice. Students will produce imagery in relation to social responsibility and cultural awareness. Dominant aesthetic conventions that favor expression over concept will be challenged as students learn to mindfully engage with digital media as a powerful form of art making, uniquely capable of responding to our rapidly transforming worlds.  Additional fee for course:  $50

Robin Gerchman

Moving Stories and Conversations
Transcript Title: Moving Stories
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Identity and Enduring Questions

Course Description:
Through dance, reading, reflective writings and conversations, this course will give students an awareness of their authentic voice in society. A synergy of movement, written word and voice is the platform from which this is to be created.  Students will narrate who they are, what they stand for, and what they believe in.  The opportunity to share this with the community will compel the students to create their own personal "moving" story.

Hilary Cooperman

Performance and Culture of the Middle East
Transcript Title: Perf & Culture of Middle East 
Course Number: rFLA 100A
Meets: section 1: T,R 8:00 - 9:15; section 2: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
In this cousrse we will look at the refugee experience inthe Middle East and begin to unravel nottions of home andcitizenship. We will explore literary texts, news articles,first-hand accounts and found objects to begin to examineand represent what we learn through arts-based researchand devised performance practices. In addition to a rangeof materials and textual sources, we may also use video,photogrphy, interactive digital media and sound to enrichand intensify our exploration of contemporary issuessurrounding the refugee experience.

Social Sciences (C)

Amy McClure

Conformity and Deviance: Self and Society
Transcript Title: Identities: Conformity&Devianc
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets: T,R 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s): Identity

Course Description:
Who am I? Am I truly unique or merely a product of my environment? How might my personality, values, feelings, and behaviors differ had I been born on the other side of the planet, in another time, or even just in another body? In this course, we will address precisely these kinds of questions by examining the complex processes through which identity is formed within society. In particular, we will explore the ongoing tension between human agency and social structure. We will examine the conditions under which people are likely to conform or deviate from social norms. We will employ a sociological perspective to make sense of all these questions and many more.

 

Nolan Kline

Mysteries of Culture
Transcript Title: Mysteries of Culture
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets: MWF: 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
In a globalizing world where people with different backgrounds, experiences, and worldviews are put into closer contact with one another, human contact may sometimes result in questions about cultural difference. This class explores concepts of culture and cultural difference, seeking to unmask cultural practices that may seem mysterious to some.

 

Chelsea Ebin

Politics in America: The Perils and Promises of Pluralism
Transcript Title: Politics in America
Course Number: rFLA 100C
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
As American politics has become increasingly polarized, questions about the influence of identity within the electorate have taken center stage. Whether the focus is on white blue-collar voters or undocumented immigrants, women or evangelical Protestants, identity is seen as central to the production of conflicting political ideologies. At the same time, American society and political institutions are valued for being pluralistic and representative of a diverse populace. Pluralism offers both the political promise of resolving difference and the peril of encouraging political divisions. This course asks students to reflect on the relationship of identity to the practice of American politics. Students will survey a range of identity-based and intersectional movements in the American electorate and consider how the principles and practices of pluralism work in contemporary American politics.


Humanities (H)

Emily Russell

Gruesome Anatomy
Transcript Title: Gruesome Anatomy
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity 

Course Description:
The minute focus of a medical examiner during autopsy; the seductive cry of the carnival barker asking you to “step right in”; the varied ways in which doctors, both real and fictional, repurpose corpses for new ends—each of these acts associated with bodies is surprisingly similar to the skills of reading and writing well. In this course, we’ll read about bodies at all kinds of extremes: from medical cadavers, to murder victims, to freak show performers. In the process, we will learn to think differently and more critically about reading by analyzing texts that are themselves strange, often both in subject matter and style.


Steven Schoen

Digital Storytelling
Transcript Title: Digital Storytelling
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity 

Course Description:
More and more the stories we tell are digital, and you can have the skills to tell them! This course centers on multimedia expression. We will study the ways stories convey who we are and how we understand others and our world. Then we will practice telling evocative, creative, powerful stories that connect personally significant aspects of ourselves to important issues in the world. Projects will include a photo essay, short audio documentary, and short video.

 

Denise Cummings

Native American Media and Culture
Transcript Title: Native American Media and Culture
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Through critical analysis of representation and the ways Native- and non-Native-created texts (film, digital video, television, radio, print media, art, literature) have contributed to the construction of racial and ethnic identities, this course specifically addresses how contemporary Indigenous peoples reclaim textual production to (in)form identity, reconstruct the past, revitalize culture, and assert sovereignty and treaty rights. Course foundations address American Indian prehistory, the European colonial period, and the American period of American Indian history and experience. The course broadly confronts how a variety of media texts and traditions intersect with questions of race, ethnicity, and other identity categories, how such texts have engaged with diversity and marginalization, class and inequality, and how they may affect identity formations and relations. Assignments address the demonstration of information and media literacies and written competencies. Students will also create short video diaries—expressive autobiographical pieces exploring some aspect of their own identities and/or experiences.

 

Kathryn Norsworthy

Mindful Activism
Transcript Title: Mindful Activism
Course Number: rFLA 100H
Meets: T,R: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Mindfulness involves remaining present, grounded, and non-reactive, even in the most intense circumstances such as when engaging in activism and social change.  Impactful social movements have been crucial in advancing peace and justice in our own society and around the world.  How are they organized?  What roles do activists play in at various stages in a movement and how can we mindfully navigate this work?  In this experiential course, we will examine several important social movements, theories and concepts linked to their success, and what we can learn and apply in developing  activist campaigns to address some of the most pressing contemporary social justice issues, such as gender-based violence, immigrant rights, and lgbtq+ rights.  As a developing activist, you will identify your own strengths and challenges and engage in experiences, including the cultivation of mindfulness as the foundation of social justice work, that promote your growth and effectiveness in this work. 

Expressive Arts (A)

Sunni Witmer

Global Pop Music
Transcript Title: Global Pop Music

Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision


Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision
The pop music aesthetic, which began in the 1960s in the United States and Great Britain, has now moved to all corners of the globe. The study of this worldwide musical style is the focus of this course. Topics include: the globalization of music and the music industry; the impact of colonialism on local musical traditions; the commodification of culture; musical traditions and modernity; the role of music in politics; and, social diversity in pop music. Associated genres such as rap, hip-hop, and reggae will also be explored. In addition to written assignments, listening projects are also assigned. No prior musical background is required to take this course.

 

Kristin Winet

Graphic Travel Memoirs
Transcript Title:
Graphic Travel Memoirs
Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: TR: 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision


Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision
In this class, we will think about the concept of the "sketch" as it pertains to travel. In art and in writing, a sketch is a brief rendering that captures the essence of something. In this course, we will be writing and thinking through the sketches of our travels.

Sunni Witmer

Latin American Expressive Arts
Transcript Title: Lat Amer Express Arts

Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: TR 8:00 - 9:15
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course is an integrated study of the expressive cultures of Latin America, with an emphasis on the role the arts play in social life. Topics include pre-Columbian art; modernist arts; Spanish American and Brazilian narrative; Latin American poetry, architecture, music, theatre, cinema, and popular culture; and Latinx culture.

Social Sciences (C)

Sarah Parsloe

Latin American Expressive Arts
Transcript Title: Lat Amer Express Arts

Course Number: rFLA 200A
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course explores how we communicate to (re)create embodied identities, producing and resisting cultural definitions of "normalcy."  We will focus on specific embodied experiences, iincluding illness, injury, disability, fatness, queerness, and race.  We will also consider how people respond to identity threats,including their own changing, unpredictable bodies.

Anca Voicu

Quo Vadis, Europe?
Transcript Title: Quo Vadis, Europe?

Course Number: rFLA 200C
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course covers the European countries’ economic development after WWII to the present day. In doing so it presents an economic framework for understanding the historical past and the change following the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989. The focus will be placed on the interconnectedness among various European economies situated in the Eastern and Western parts of the European continent, and their interactions within the international economy.



Yusheng Yao

China's Rise
Transcript Title: China's Rise

Course Number: rFLA 200C
Meets: TR 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course examines the causes, process and effects of China's rise in the past three decades and its implications to international politics and economics.  China's rise will be explored in the historical context of China's modern transformation including the Western challenges, rise of nationalism, search for modern identity, and success and failure of communist revolution under Mao Zedong.

Humanities (H)

Li Wei

Self & Otherness in World Music
Transcript Title: Self & Otherness in World Music

Course Number: rFLA 200H
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
Is music a universal language?  If yes, where is semantics?  If not, why Gangnam Style and some other "ethnic" music enjoy huge popularity across cultures?  While musical expression is a common human behavior, the meaning of it is often culturally specific.  In this course, we will explore the cognitive and semiotic aspects of music and their role in shaping our cultural perception of identity.  In particular, we will look at some important trends in world music (a mass-mediate, cross-cultural evolving popular music genre) and examine how accelerated transnational movements of people, ideas, capital, and information cross-fertilized music making and blurred cultural boundaries. 

This course will use music, a metaphor of social and cultural processes, to explore fluid and pre-mutational traits of human identity in a global music exchange context.  It will challenge old habits of thinking about ethnic, religious, and cultural identities, and illustrate how cross-cultural musical engagement can reinforce cultural affinity and create hybrid expression.

 

Jana Mathews & Ben Hudson

The Italian Imaginary
Transcript Title: English Lit & Italy 1600 - 1900

Course Number: rFLA 200H
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s) Identity and Cultural Collision

 

Course Description:
Shakespeare probably never visited Italy, and Byron and Shelley only briefly vacationed there, but these writers' shared love affair with the country is well documented in the combined portfolio of plays, novels and stories that are set there. In this field study to Milan and Venice, we will analyze the ways in which the idea of Italy serves as a projection of the English literary imagination and how that fantasy works to construct individual, communal, and national identities. Activities include archival research at local institutions and visits to museums, cathedrals, historic casinos and asylums.

300 level seminar courses

Rachel Simmons

Graphic Narratives
Transcript Title: English Lit & Italy 1600 - 1900

Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: Thursdays 8:00 - 10:45
Theme(s) Identity and Innovation

Course Description:
What stories can you tell about your experiences as a Rollins student? How do these stories highlight the college mission of being a “global citizen and responsible leader”?  This course ask you to research and create a visual narrative that explores the meaning of your liberal art experience at Rollins College.



 

Sunni Witmer

Music & Politics in the Americas
Transcript Title: Music&Politics in the Americas

Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: T,R 9:30 - 10:45
Theme(s): Identity 

Course Description:
This course focuses on the role music has played, and continues to play, in influencing and defining political and social justice movements throughout the diverse societies of the Americas.  Theoretical constructs such as nationalism, identity, ethnicity, race, and class, as they relate to music, will be examined.

Lucy Littler

Racial Fictions
Transcript Title: Racial Fictions

Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Identity and Environment

Course Description:
In this course we will examine race as fiction—a carefully constructed narrative that draws audiences in and solicits their belief in its “truth.” We will consider how race has been made, revised, and used in American culture. Course texts will include novels, multidisciplinary scholarship, news media, and pop-culture artifacts.

Jennifer Cavenaugh and Meredith Hein

Practicing Social Justice_CE
Transcript Title: Practicing Social Justice_CE

Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

Course Description:
This course asks students to reflect on how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof) and then asks them to identify and analyze systems of oppression at work in their own community. Finally, it empowers them with tools to create a specific positive social action to address a problem they have identified in their community. Students will build upon their previous IMW coursework to create an autobiography that explores how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof). The course will then utilize the techniques of Augusto Boal's "Theater of the Oppressed" to empower students to address one aspect of oppression through community based advocacy or activism. As part of this class, you will engage in community-based experiences through service-learning projects and individual engagement with local community organizations, using your previous skills and knowledge to address one of the community partner’s needs. In addition to taking your learning outside of the classroom and engaging with local community organizations, you will also reflect on how you would like to put your knowledge to use after graduation. MCMP and WCMP

Hilary Cooperman

Practicing Social Justice_CE
Transcript Title: Practicing Social Justice_CE

Course Number: rFLA 300
Meets: MWF 9:00 - 9:50
Theme(s): Identity and Cultural Collision

FALL 2018

IDENTITIES: MIRRORS AND WINDOWS

IDENTITIES: MIRRORS AND WINDOWS

Identities: Mirrors and Windows

Who do you see when you look in the “mirror”? How does your self-image relate to the view beyond your own “window”? As the title of our neighborhood suggests, the study of identity is fundamentally the study of context.  In IMW, we will examine the communities and networks that shape the ways that we exist in and interact with the world around us. As we analyze these intersections between self and community, we will come to understand how people of diverse backgrounds impact, and are impacted by, the larger social, cultural, natural, and physical networks of which we all are a part.  What you learn in our neighborhood will ultimately empower you to take meaningful and responsible action as citizens of the world – a goal that is central to our College’s overarching mission.
FALL 2018 COURSES

FALL 2018 COURSES

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

John Grau

Sing Your Heart Out
CRN: 90308
Transcript Title: Voice Class and Identity
Course Number: IMW200A.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

One of the most personal traits that we possess is our voice.  When robbed of the ability to speak, people often report a loss of identity or a loss of expression.  Understanding how the human voice works and how to maintain it is of tremendous importance in all careers.  In this course, we will look under the microscope and explore the physical capabilities of the human voice and identity expression through Classical solo singing and performance. This course will use individual singing and music to explore the possibilities for identity expression.  Through intentional song selection and assignment, we will portray characters from different backgrounds and identities.  We will improve overall vocal health and function through the study of vocal anatomy and physiology, which will allow for more confident, clear speech and will help foster individual identity expression.  We will also consider the role that music plays in individual, group, and brand identity expression. The skills that will be gained from this course are applicable to any career or focus.

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Missy Barnes

Women in Theatre
CRN:  90309
Transcript Title: Women in Theatre
Course Number: IMW200A.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
How does theatre reflect our understanding of identity in relation to ethnicity, race, gender, religion, and sexuality? Theatre represents the human condition within the contexts of specific historical and cultural moments. This course will focus on plays that investigate what it means to be human in the face of social conflict and the outcomes that result from intolerance. During the course of the semester, students will read a variety of plays and discuss, as well as write about, the issues presented within each play. In past semesters we have read a minimum of ten plays, including such works as "A Raisin in the Sun," "Disgraced," "The Elephant Man," and "Looking for Normal."

EXPRESSIVE ARTS

Caitlin Mohr
Songs from the Soul
CRN: 90310
Transcript Title: Songs from the Soul
Course Number: IMW 200A.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

This course will examine song literature through the perspectives of the poet, composer and performer. Elements of song will be examined in repertoire from Copland to Lady Gaga to Hamilton the musical. Students will reflect on the breadth of their personal experiences and expression of self-identity in relation to a diverse community of artists of the past and present.

HUMANITIES

Mario D'Amato

Mind and Mediatation
CRN: 90314
Transcript Title: Mind and Mediatation
Course Number: IMW200H.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
This course will focus on accounts regarding how the self is constructed according to Buddhist philosophy, and Western philosophy of mind and cognitive science. We will examine what the philosopher Michel Foucault has referred to as “technologies of the self,” i.e., techniques that have been employed by individuals to “transform themselves in order to attain a certain state of happiness, purity, wisdom.” So we will consider the construction of identities, and examine techniques that have been employed to function as mirrors and windows for the construction of self, through studying the theory of Buddhist meditation.

HUMANITIES

James Driggers

Queered Landscapes Identity and Community in Transition
CRN: 90315
Transcript Title: Queered Landscapes
Course Number: IMW200H.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
The course includes study of selected works by and about bisexual, gay, lesbian and transgender individuals. Representative works discussed are chosen to illustrate portrayals of individual identity and life as well as political and changes in the GLBTQ community over time -- from a period of "invisibility," through the AIDS crisis, into the present, looking at the struggles unique to each generation.

HUMANITIES

Stacey Coffman-Rosen

Disabilities, Bodies, and Identities
CRN: 90751
Transcript Title:Disability,Body, Identity
Course Number: IMW200H.3
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course; Counts as 200-level elective in Critical Media and Culture Studies major.

How do we relate to bodies, minds, and identities that are different than our own, and how does that determine our place in a changing society? In this course, we will examine how disabilities, bodies, and identities intersect and determine how we interpret and occupy bodies in intersecting categories. Course topics include: media and disability; becoming disabled; disability, race, gender, and sexual orientation; Deafness and Deaf culture; aesthetics and fashion; disability and sports; and “outsider” sexuality. You will examine your own "body politic," and the bodies of others. Course readings will be supplemented with film, cultural artifacts, personal writing, and interactive projects.

SCIENCES

Suzanne Woodward

Identity and the Social Self
CRN: 90315
Course Number: IMW200S.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course
Identity and the Social Self will be an in-depth examination of research and theory in social psychology related to such topics as gender norms related to helping behavior, court accuracy of eyewitnesses, treatment of stress and illness, the role of evolution and culture in attraction, prejudice and social inequalities, and conformity and obedience.  Our sense of self is formed in part by our social interactions.  This course will explore how our social groups inform and create out individual identities.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Stephanie Guittar

Intersections of the Latinx Experience in the U.S.
CRN: 90311
Transcript Title: Intersections of Latinxs
Course Number: IMW200C.1
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

This course presents an overview of the Latinx experience in the United States with special focus on intersectionality, stereotypes, and identity formation and management. In this course, we will answer questions such as: Who makes up Latinxs in the U.S.? How is the Latinx experience similar/different to other ethnic groups in the U.S.? How do social institutions affect Latinxs’ identity and life chances? Topics include but are not limited to: Latinx identity, family and household structure, gender roles, sexuality, educational attainment, labor force participation, and health outcomes among Latinxs living in the U.S.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Vincent Melograno

Sport in Perspective:  Institutions, Culture, and Globalization
CRN:  90312 / 90313
Course Number: IMW200C.2
Prerequisite: One 100-level Neighborhood course

This course explores sport as a worldwide institution and how it functions in relation to and in conflict with other institutions. The interaction between sport and cultures is critically analyzed relative to ethical/moral decision making, diversity, and deviant behaviors. The globalization of sport reflecting our increasingly connected world is examined.

300-LEVEL COURSES

300-LEVEL COURSES

300-LEVEL COURSES

Lucy Littler

Racial Fictions
CRN: 90317
Transcript Title: Racial Fictions
Course Number: IMW300.1
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP

Is race fact or fiction? Like a novel, is “race” designed to draw audiences in and solicit their belief in its version of the truth? Or is it more than a story? Is “race” a reality that meaningfully impacts individuals, communities, and ideologies? Rooted in the study of 20 c. American literature and using multiple disciplinary lenses to enrich our examination, our course will consider these compelling questions—not only how we answer, but also the implications and consequences of asking, and what we do with our developing perspectives.

300-LEVEL

Lisa Tillmann

Body Liberation, Food Justice
CRN: 90319
Transcript Title: Body Liberation, Food Justice
Course Number: IMW300
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP competencies. FCMP and third 200-level neighborhood course may be taken concurrently. This course could substitute for CMC320, SEB/SE, GBH, PPE, or SWAG elective.

Whose interests are served by ways we relate to our bodies, to others’ bodies, to eating, and to food? In the arenas of body and food, who has what kind of power? Who profits and at whose expense? How can we resist and promote healthier relationships with body and food?

300-LEVEL

Jennifer Cavenaugh

The Practice of Social Justice Performing Reisistance
CRN: 90318
Transcript Title: Practicing Social Justice
Course Number: IMW300.2
Prerequisites: One 100-level and at least two 200-level Neighborhood courses, MCMP and WCMP

This course asks students to reflect on how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof) and then asks them to identify and analyze systems of oppression at work in their own community. Finally, it empowers them with tools to create a specific positive social action to address a problem they have identified in their community. Students will build upon their previous IMW coursework to create an autobiography that explores how their own identity has been shaped by power and privilege (or the absence thereof). The course will then utilize the techniques of Augusto Boal's "Theater of the Oppressed" to empower students to address one aspect of oppression through community based advocacy or activism. As part of this class, you will engage in community-based experiences through service-learning projects and individual engagement with local community organizations, using your previous skills and knowledge to address one of the community partner’s needs. In addition to taking your learning outside of the classroom and engaging with local community organizations, you will also reflect on how you would like to put your knowledge to use after graduation.