English
Spring 2018

ENG 140 Composition: Writing About Selected Topics
Develops students' ability to write college-level essays by practicing strategies of argumentation and by refining skills of invention, revision, and critical thinking. Leads to writing essays characterized by unity, order, coherence, completeness, clarity, and mechanical correctness. In order to satisfy the College's general education requirement for writing (W), students must receive a grade of C or better in the course. Section topics are designated by individual instructors. This course (or an equivalent) must be taken during the first semester at Rollins. Does not count as elective credit in the English Major or Minor or the Writing Minor.

ENG 167 Introduction to Creative Writing
Requires writing in a variety of genres including fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Emphasizes peer evaluation, thus requiring that students learn to evaluate the writing of others, as well as their own writing. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 190 Crime Stories
Crime stories—from the novels of Raymond Chandler to HBO’s True Detective and TBS’s Search Party—have been integral parts of the literary, film, and television canons. In this course, we will examine a number of contributors to the genre and identify defining elements of these texts. During our readings, viewings, and discussions—as well as in the required writing for the course—we will look for intersections in the authors’ work and develop methods for critical interrogation through close reading and attention to theme, form, and style. Finally, we will explore the connections between these works and their historical moment, examining how this genre often speaks to the anxieties produced by times of societal and cultural change.

ENG 190 Sex & its Discontents
In this class, students will consider representations of sex and gender in literature across genres since the 19th century. Students can expect to read classic novels like Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando in addition to newer works of writing like Alice Notley’s feminist epic poem The Descent of Alette and Audre Lorde’s mytho-biography Zami. Finally, we will also be reading works from contemporary queer authors Alison Bechdel and Garth Greenwell, the latter of whom will be on campus in February for Winter with the Writers.

ENG 190 Literary Selfies
“A Self is probably the most impressive work of art we ever produce, surely the most intricate. For we create not just one self-making story but many of them…The job is to get them all into one identity and lined up over time…For it is not just who and what we are that we want to get straight, but who and what we might have been, given the constraints that memory and culture impose on us, constraints of which we are often unaware.” (14)

As Jerome Bruner explains in Making Stories: Law, Literature, and Life, we are the authors of our own selfhood, creating our identities as stories to keep for our own consumption, and stories to share with the world around us. In ENG 190: Literary Selfies in 20c. American Literature, we will explore self as narrative in both the novels we read and our own lived experiences.

ENG 202 Major English Writings II
Covers 18th-century romantic, Victorian, and 20th-century writers: Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Hopkins, Yeats, Joyce, and Eliot. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 206 Grammar Bootcamp
Covers basic English grammar as well as more advanced grammar to prepare students for advanced writing courses. Topics include parts of speech, sentence structure, punctuation, diction, and cohesion. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 211 Visual and Verbal Text Design
Investigates how visuals (pictures, graphics, color, and layout) interact with words to add or disrupt meaning in texts. Studies cutting-edge research on visual perception. Practices document design using InDesign software. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 221 World Drama
Introduces major writers and theoretical approaches in one or more literary traditions other than - or in combination with - British and/or American. Specific topics vary. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 225 Practices of Effective Writing
Helps students refine writing skills by developing sound rhetorical practices and editing strategies.  In order to earn credit for this course, students must receive a grade of “C” or higher. Note: A mandatory pre-course assessment will be required. The results of this assessment may exempt some students from the need to complete the course.  Students who do not take the assessment will be required to complete the course. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 233 Mean Girls in Lit & Film
From Cinderella and The Crucible to Beatrice Bobs her Hair and Mean Girls, the mean girl is ubiquitous in American culture, literature, and film. In this course, we will discuss the cultural phenomenon of the mean girl, exploring some critical questions about gender in society (the construction of gender, how “gender scripts” for dress, appearance, behavior get written, how your generation is blowing up old ideas about gender, the ways that gender intersects with race, ethnicity and sexuality), through popular and literary American texts. In other words, we will explore critical questions about gender in society, and tie it all together with Mean Girls. Readings may include The Crucible, The Children’s Hour, Sula, The Hunger Games. Films may include The Crucible, Saved, Heathers, Mean Girls. We might even watch a little “How to Get Away with Murder.”

ENG 234 Sex, War, Plague
This course, team-taught by medieval and contemporary scholars, incorporates texts ranging from 14th- century gynecological manuals to an exposé on the modern pornography industry; medieval torture devices to Post 9/11 “Torture Memos” and photography from Abu Ghraib; and tales from the plague linked to visions of zombie apocalypse.

ENG 267 Intermediate Creative Nonfiction
Prerequisite: ENG 140 or consent.

ENG 267 Visual Poetry
In this class, we will think about the textual elements of writing: lines, letters, symbols, font. We will also think about poems as visual objects. You will begin to practice how to manipulate found and created text in MS Word and Indesign. You will also experiment with cut-up techniques and erasures, as well as juxtaposing images with text. By the end of the class you will produce a set of visual poems that move together in a sequence—a chapbook of visual poems. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or consent.

ENG 300B Expository Writing: Informal Essay
This course offers students writing practice in the informal essay, a form of writing characterized by self-reflection, individual tastes and experiences, open form, and conversational manner. Early practitioners include E.B. White, Joan Didion, and John McPhee. Students will study the primary qualities demonstrated by these and other masters of the informal essay:narrative techniques, flexible structure and design, unity and order, rhetorical intent, and tone. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 300H Expository Writing: Persuasive Writing
This is a course in writing formal and informal arguments. In addition to reading, analyzing, and writing various types of arguments, students discuss theories of argumentation and argumentative strategies, study logical structure and effective use of evidence in arguments; consider the role of audience and rhetorical appeals to persuade an audience. Essay assignments ask students to practice using definition, casual, resemblance, proposal, and evaluation arguments. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 307 Immigrants in Am Lit & Film
How does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten Spot in the Caribbean by providence, impoverished, in squalor Grow up to be a hero and a scholar? (Lin-Manuel Miranda)

Dreamers, Refugees, Pilgrims, Slaves, huddled masses yearning to breathe free.
The notion of the American Dream was founded on immigration. Why then, all this talk of building walls? Why the airport protests? Despite our identity as a nation of immigrants, American society has always been conflicted on the subject of inclusion and assimilation. This course will discuss the American immigrant through literature and film, from Equiano to Diaz, Adiche, and the graphic novel American Born Chinese; from Chaplin’s The Immigrant to The Godfather (II) and The Visitor, as well as in political discourse, from Hamilton to Trump. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 310 Hoarders
This course explores the relationship between things and people, with special emphasis paid to the intersections between premodern and contemporary modes and theories of collecting, preserving, displaying, consuming and saving in literature. Topics include (but are not limited to) menageries and cat ladies; dragon hoards and modern-day Scrooges; private collectors and public libraries, and word hoards and dictionaries. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 315 21st Century Victorians
Ecological disaster, industrial pollution, rape culture, urban poverty, racism, and settler colonialism are of course not problems unique to the twenty-first century. This class will compare 19th-century responses or examinations of these issues in Victorian literature to contemporary documentaries/texts exploring the endurance of the problem. Students can expect to read classic Victorian novels by Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Thomas Hardy and make connections across time to the world we inhabit today. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 321 Contemporary Caribbean Writing
Students enrolled in this course will study the creative and critical work of (mainly female) writers of Caribbean origin in the United States and Great Britain. Special attention will be paid to their explorations of migration, colonial and post-colonial histories, contemporary lives in the era of globalization, race, and identity.
Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 334 20th Century British Drama
Studies the major movements and playwrights over the last 125 years of British drama.  Playwrights include: Shaw, Beckett, Pinter, Churchill, Kane, Ravenhill, and McDonagh.  (The readings in this class contain explicit material.  Not for the faint of heart or those easily offended.)

ENG 344 Pain & Pleasure in Media & Lit
In 344 we will examine “negative” affects (sadness, depression, humiliation) and their relationship to gender, race constructions and sexuality as well as formal structures of films, poems, plays, and manifestos. What makes up our fascination with certain forms of negativity, particularly when it is ritualized through narrative and performance?  How do we consume such emotion as pleasurable?  We will look at plays, performances, and artworks, such Kara Walker's silhouettes that disrupt the dynamics of gendered and racialized self-abnegation.  We will also examine recent films such as Black Swan and Melancholia. We will ask ourselves how certain types of “negative” emotions are privileged in our art and media.  Are these expressions of self-oppressive, self-indulgent, cathartic, consoling, liberatory and/or all of the above?

ENG 345 Hemlock,Harlots,& Harassment
Ancient Greek and Roman rhetoricians developed a rich theory of persuasion, especially of political speech. This class delves into these theories, covering topics such as argument, audience, speaker, delivery, values, emotions, and figures of speech as taught by Socrates, Aristotle, the Sophists, Quintilian, Cicero and others. We will use these theories to analyze both classical and modern examples of political discourse, from speeches to tweets, from campaigning to complaining, and from aspirations to attacks. Let’s find out what Aristotle would think of Obama, Hillary, and @therealDonaldTrump.

ENG 361 Writing for the Professions
This is not a class about resume templates. Or, maybe it is…in some ways. This course will introduce you to the world of professional writing, particularly as it relates to the workplace and to the kinds of writing scenarios you will encounter in your professional lives. As such, we will be investigating and studying genres of writing that are both public and performative—meaning we will be studying writing that answers questions, solves problems, explains procedures, promotes products and services, and shares information within and across communities. Throughout the semester, we will compose emails, letters, and memos for a variety of rhetorical situations; research and write reports on writing cultures and practices; discuss contemporary controversies and conversations in professional writing; and produce proposals and deliverables for a professional organization. At the end of the semester, we will present our final projects to our partner—and you will have a portfolio of work to show future employers. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 367 Creative Writ Wkshop: Fiction
Alternates focus among various writing genres including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, children's literature. Requires strong, established creative writing skills and experience in writing workshops. Refer to the online Schedule of Courses for topics currently being offered. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 367 Creative Writing:Feral Poetry
In this class you will mix up poetry/prose, snippets, maps of childhood, found objects to make nests, burrows, and other alternative habitats of “the wild.”  “Feral” refers to animals we think of as domesticated that have gone wild.  What does it mean to think of our pastoral landscape as a feral space?  How do we write poems in the voice of the animals always around us?  What might untamed poetry look like?  You will produce a feral chapbook!  You will spend time outdoors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 367 Creative Writing Workshop
Students enrolled in this advanced creative writing course will focus on a single genre (either fiction or creative nonfiction). In order to facilitate both levels and genres, the course will be taught through the techniques relevant to all good writing (imagery, voice, setting, character, story). Ideally, students will have already taken several creative writing courses, (including at the 300-level for those registered for ENG-467) and have a familiarity with the elements and subgenres of their preferred form. All stories and essays will be workshopped and edited by all students. At the end of this course ENG-467 students should have produced a portfolio of work suitable for submission to literary journals or to support an MFA candidacy application. ENG-367 students, in addition to several shorter exercises, will have two substantially revised essays or stories. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 367M Writing Life: Garth Greenwell and Luis Muñoz
Emphasis on various writing genres (fiction, creative nonfiction, etc.). Requires strong, established creative writing skills and experience in writing workshops. Prerequisite: ENG 167.

Descriptions for the two seminar meetings:

Luis Muñoz: The Question of Influence: Writing with Lorca
Developing as a writer means finding a way to make use of the influence of great writers from the past. In this seminar, Luis Muñoz will explore the question of influence by looking at the work of Federico García Lorca, one of the greatest Spanish poets of the 20th century and a poet who has influenced Luis's own poems. Students will also experiment with creating original work using exercises modeled on some of Lorca's poems. 

Garth Greenwell: The Problem of Style
“Style” is something people talk about a great deal, but often without a clear sense of what it means. In this class we’ll try to be as concrete as possible, examining the elements that make up style in order to see how writers manipulate them to create a sense of distinctive voice. We’ll look at a number of examples of published work that exhibit strong and interesting style, and offer exercises for you to begin experimenting with the techniques we discuss. Please bring a paragraph of your own writing that you feel is representative of your style. 

ENG 374 Editing Essentials
A close study of syntax, i.e., how the various components of a sentence combine to create meaning and effect. Focuses on editing for correctness (grammar, usage, punctuation, mechanics) and on editing for precision (unity, order, coherence, emphasis, diction). Prerequisite: English Majors/Minors and Writing Minors. ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 394 Winter With the Writers
Conducted in conjunction with the visiting authors series, whose work will be the focus of study. Includes biographical research and critical studies in papers and panels in advance of writers� visits. Provides opportunity to meet these writers and discuss their work in master classes. Offers opportunity to combine an academic experience with a deeper involvement in the literary community on the campus. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 430 Huck Finn's Literary Kin
Often described as the quintessential American novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn introduces its readers to one of the most unique and developed first-person narrators in American literary history.  For the writers who followed Twain, Huck’s voice was and is a narrative inspiration that gives license to construct texts with memorable and unique points-of-view.  Huck Finn’s literary kin are an eclectic bunch.  We’ll examine classics by Willa Cather, Harper Lee and Toni Morrison and contemporary novels by Gabriel Tallent and Jesmyn Ward, listening for echoes of their literary father.

ENG 444 Stranger than Fiction
Television, film, novels, short stories, conversations, family stories, cultural lore, autobiography…Narrative is so ubiquitous in daily life that we can fail to appreciate its influence on who we are, how we think, and how we interact with the world. Drawing on multiple disciplines (literary studies, cultural studies, rhetoric, cognitive studies, and sociolinguistics), this course will delve into the workings of narrative in our lives. Particular attention will be given to the overlap between fictional and nonfictional narratives as well as how narrative impacts our sense of self.

ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop
Students enrolled in this advanced creative writing course will focus on a single genre (either fiction or creative nonfiction). In order to facilitate both levels and genres, the course will be taught through the techniques relevant to all good writing (imagery, voice, setting, character, story). Ideally, students will have already taken several creative writing courses, (including at the 300-level for those registered for ENG-467) and have a familiarity with the elements and subgenres of their preferred form. All stories and essays will be workshopped and edited by all students. At the end of this course ENG-467 students should have produced a portfolio of work suitable for submission to literary journals or to support an MFA candidacy application. ENG-367 students, in addition to several shorter exercises, will have two substantially revised essays or stories. This course may be taken three (3) times for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 367 or ENG 360; or consent.

ENG 467 Creative Writing:Feral Poetry
In this class you will mix up poetry/prose, snippets, maps of childhood, found objects to make nests, burrows, and other alternative habitats of “the wild.”  “Feral” refers to animals we think of as domesticated that have gone wild.  What does it mean to think of our pastoral landscape as a feral space?  How do we write poems in the voice of the animals always around us?  What might untamed poetry look like?  You will produce a feral chapbook!  You will spend time outdoors. This course may be taken three (3) times for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 367 or ENG 360; or consent.