Theatre Arts and Dance

Theatre Arts and Dance


Changes effective Fall Term 2018

Barnes Cavenaugh Charles Cody-Rapport
Cooperman DiQuattro Gerchman Griffin
Miller Ouellette Zivot


The theatre major offers a comprehensive education in the art and craft of the theatre. The curriculum exposes students broadly to theatre history, literature, theory, and criticism, and provides rigorous training in acting, directing, design, dramaturgy, and technical theatre. To achieve these skills, students complete a series of required courses and participate in the departmental production program.

Philosophy

The Rollins College Department of Theatre and Dance provides for the development of imaginative, purposeful, and skilled expression. The department inspires students' artistic, intellectual, and personal growth. Graduates of the program are prepared to lead, collaborate with, and enrich the communities in which they live, work, and serve.

Performance

The department typically produces eight (8) theatre and dance productions per year at two on-campus venues: the Annie Russell Theatre, a 377-seat proscenium theatre listed on the National Registry of Historic Places, and a flexible black box theatre space.

Majors take a set of courses and concentrate in performance, design and technical theatre, musical theatre, directing, or dramaturgy. The department issues a comprehensive reading list of theatre literature for majors. Faculty evaluate student progress at the end of the sophomore year, and seniors must complete a senior capstone experience.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Fifty-four (54) credit hours are required, including:

  • a core of eleven (11) courses,
    all majors take a core sequence of seven (7) four-hour courses and four (4) two-hour production courses; and
  • an emphasis in one (1) of five (5) areas,
    all majors select an area of emphasis consisting of five (5) four-hour courses and a two-hour capstone course; and
  • successful completion of the department's Sophomore Review process.

CORE COURSES

  • THE 111 Introduction to Technical Theatre
  • THE 112 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design
  • THE 133 Acting I: Fundamentals
  • THE 201 Script Analysis
  • THE 210 Survey of Western Dramatic Literature
  • THE 341 History of the Theatre I
  • THE 342 History of the Theatre II OR THE 205 Musical Theatre History (option is only available for musical theatre emphasis)
  • Four (4) from among these five (5) courses: THE 418, 419, 420, 421 Theatre Production (Technical), or DAN 422 Dance Production.

CONCENTRATIONS

  • Design/Technical Theatre
  • Directing
  • Dramaturgy
  • Musical Theatre
  • Performance

DESIGN/TECHNICAL THEATRE CONCENTRATION

  • THE 221 Design/Technical Theatre Studio
  • THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals
  • Two (2) of the following:
    • THE 321 Scene Design
    • THE 322 Lighting Design
    • THE 323 Costume Design
    • THE 324 Sound Design
  • THE 481 Senior Design/Technical Theatre Portfolio/Capstone

DIRECTING CONCENTRATION

  • One (1) of the following:
    • DAN 135 Freedom to Move
    • THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice
    • THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 321 Scene Design
    • THE 322 Lighting Design
    • THE 323 Costume Design
    • THE 324 Sound Design
  • THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals
  • THE 433 Directing II: Advanced
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Directing Project/Capstone

DRAMATURGY CONCENTRATION

  • THE 280 Research Methods for Dramaturgs and Directors
  • THE 341 History of Theatre I (in core courses)
  • THE 342 History of Theatre II (in core courses)

Dramaturgy emphasis students must choose at least one from each of the following three sub-specialities:

  • Theatre History and Dramaturgical Research
    • DAN 203 Dance History
    • THE 215 Global Theatre
    • THE 241 Classical Theatre
    • THE 350 Gender and Performance
    • THE 360 Forbidden Acts: The Queer Aesthetic in 20th Century Theatre and Film
    • ENG 312 Studies in Shakespeare
  • Community Building Through Theatre
    • THE 244 Theatre and Disability
    • THE 265 Performance Ethnography
    • THE 336 Theatre for Social Change
  • Collaborative Theatre Development
    • THE 202 Performance Design
    • THE 225 Improvisational Theatre I: Fundamentals
    • THE 333 Directing I
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Thesis/Capstone

MUSICAL THEATRE CONCENTRATION

  • One (1) of the following:
    • MUA 101/102 Applied Music for Enrichment I/II
    • THE 204 Musicianship for Actors
  • One (1) of the following:
    • DAN 155 Musical Theatre Dance
    • DAN 175 Tap I
    • DAN 177 Jazz Dance I
    • DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique
  • THE 255 Acting for Musical Theatre I
  • THE 355 Acting for Musical Theatre II
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Performance Project/Capstone

PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION

  • Two (2) of the following:
    • DAN 135 Freedom to Move
    • THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice
    • THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics
  • One (1) of the following:
    • THE 225 Improvisational Theatre I: Fundamentals
    • THE 236 Voice and Speech II: Vocal Dynamics
    • THE 255 Acting for Musical Theatre I
    • THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals
    • THE 336 Theatre for Social Change
  • THE 233 Acting II: Character w/Laboratory
  • THE 480 Senior Theatre Performance Project/Capstone


MINOR REQUIREMENTS

The minor offers a basic education in the art and craft of theatre. Students become familiar with theatre history, literature, theory, and criticism, and become competent in acting, design, and technical theatre. To achieve these skills, students complete a series of required courses and participate in the departmental production program.

Twenty-eight (28) credit hours are required.

  • Six (6) four-hour courses
  • Two (2) two-hour production courses
  • THE 111 Introduction to Technical Theatre
  • THE 112 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design
  • THE 133 Acting I: Fundamentals
  • THE 210 Survey of Western Dramatic Literature
  • One (1) of the following:
    • DAN 135 Freedom to Move
    • DAN 170 Ballet I
    • DAN 177 Jazz I
    • DAN 179 Modern Dance I
    • THE 234 Movement I
  • One (1) elective at the 200-400 level
  • Two (2) from among these five (5) courses: THE 418, 419, 420, 421 Theatre Production (Technical), or DAN 422 Dance Production.

Course of Study


THE 100 Introduction to the Theatre
: Surveys history of theatre art and crafts. Discusses major plays and playwrights, physical stage, dramatic criticism, acting, directing, stagecraft, design, and other relevant crafts. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 111 Introduction to Technical Theatre: This hands-on class, supplemented with demonstration and discussion, introduces fundamental technical skills in safety, stage management, scenic construction, costume construction, scene painting, lighting and sound.

THE 112 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design: Examines through weekly projects the creative process fundamental to designing for stage. Focuses on visual communication and critical response. Includes drawing, painting, collage, and research projects.

THE 113 Fundamentals of Makeup for the Theatre: Explores basics of makeup application, creation of character makeup, and masks for stage. Combines one-hour lecture/demonstration with two-hour lab each week.

THE 131 Introduction to Acting: Nonmajor: Combines study and practice of basic rehearsal and performance techniques. Emphasizes evolution of performer's role.

THE 133 Acting I: Fundamentals: Focuses on development of the actor in audition and performance settings. Develops concentration, imagination, and spontaneity through individual and ensemble exercises.

THE 136 Voice and Speech I: Free Voice: Investigates the fundamental principles and functionality of voice production and speech mechanics. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 170 Rollins Improv Institute: Level I: Rollins Improv Institute is an immersive learning environment for performers from diverse backgrounds. Designed for students who are relatively new to the tenants of improvisational theatre, level one explores the tools and philosophies of improvisation and develops strategies for collective creation and communication that are applicable across multiple fields. (Summer Course)

THE 201 Script Analysis: Analyzes structure, style, theme, and characterization in plays from a variety of historical periods. Discusses stage worthiness of scripts and theories affecting creative interpretation and performance. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 202 Performance Design: Addresses the aesthetic and immersive aspects of theatrical expression, utilizing both performance as representation of ideas and meanings, and design through abstract concepts and tangible processes and materials, in the service of crafting meaningful performances that do not rely heavily on texts and script-centric work. Students will gain confidence in their ability to make an artistic contribution as they collectively devise ways to communicate through a sequence of interpretive projects.

THE 204 Musicianship for Actors: Enhances students' understanding of music as it applies to the musical theatre. Students will learn basic musicianship and vocal technique.

THE 203 History of American Film: Chronicles development of movies and political and socioeconomic impact of film industry from early 20th century to present. Requires evening movie viewing. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 205 History of American Musical Theatre: Traces development from early and current European influences to present American musicals. Analyzes political, social, and musical styles. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 206 History of Radio and Television: Surveys broadcasting from 1900 to present: inventions, trends, programs, events, and personalities. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 208 Research Methods for Dramaturgs and Directors: Introduction to the historic role of the dramaturg and the research and writing methods necessary to execute the role of director or dramaturg in the service of theatre production. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 210 Survey of Western Dramatic Literature: Covers major playwrights, genres, and dramatic texts from Ancient Greek tragedy to modern American realism and beyond. Evaluates the ways in which Western culture has (mis)represented itself and others onstage and given meaning to the human experience. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 215 Global Theatre: Explores the place of theatre and drama in a globalized world, from European colonial exploration to the heights of imperial power to the twentieth century eras of decolonization and now post-colonialism and globalized international theatre markets. This course interrogates closely the role of language in the production and transmission of dramatic texts and theatre practices.

THE 220 History of American Musical Film: Historical overview of the American film musical from its inception in the 1920's to the present. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 221 Design/Technical Theatre Studio: Addresses the communication between theatrical design and technology. In a studio setting, students learn advanced techniques to design, draw, construct, paint, sculpt, sew, and light a variety of projects. Prerequisites: THE 111, THE 211, or consent.

THE 225 Improvisational Theatre I: Fundamentals: Investigates the fundamental concepts and principles of improvisational theatre that enable collaborative, spontaneous play. Particular emphasis is given to issues of storyline, scenic structure, and team-based creativity. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 233 Acting II: Character w/Laboratory: Prepares actor to express believable, repeatable actions in scene work and monologues through text analysis, improvisation, and exercises. Stresses techniques of finding and playing objectives and intentions. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 133.

THE 234 Movement I: Body Dynamics: Explores the physical demands placed on the actor. Techniques learned are for finding a basic knowledge of the body's energies. Skills taught may include: dance technique, improvisation, mime, Pilates, unarmed combat, and physical improvisation. Prerequisites: THE 133 required, THE 136 suggested.

THE 236 Voice and Speech II: Vocal Dynamics: Investigates advanced principles and functionality of voice production and speech mechanics. Intended for THE majors/minors. Prerequisite: THE 136.

THE 241 Classical Theatre: Follows development of classical tragedy and comedy through readings in translation -- drama from Aeschylus to O'Neill and theory from Plato to Nietzsche. Considers mythology, architectural and scenic innovations, and connections between religion and theatre. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 244 Theatre and Disability: Provides a broad overview of the barriers to access for, individuals with disabilities in the performing arts. Students examine various philosophies of disability, manifestos, and works of science and social science. We examine critically how the disabled have been portrayed in the drama historically and in contemporary drama.

THE 248 Audition Techniques: An in-depth study of the conditions surrounding and within the audition experience. Examines various audition environments and the techniques, knowledge, and skills required to be effective in both theatre and media auditions. Prerequisite: THE 133.

THE 249 Acting for the Camera: Classes build from the student's use of Stanislavsky's System and the Triune Brain. Aims to train the actor for the technical demands of acting on a film or television set. Prerequisite: THE 133 or consent.

THE 255 Acting for Musical Theatre I: Delves into textual/lyric analysis and history and context of different writing styles (including classical aria, 19th-century patter song, American standard, and Broadway and West End musical). Prerequisite: THE 133 or consent.

THE 260 Feminist Theatre: Examines theatre companies and practitioners throughout the world who have committed themselves to telling "women's stories" in various types of performances, ranging from traditional plays to performance art. Explores the ways in which a feminist perspective shapes both the content and form of theatrical practice.

THE 265 Critical Performance Ethnography: Examines performance as a site of inquiry into social justice issues, and the way in which our actions and behaviors do something that both produces and reflects our societies and cultures. Students engage in research as a co-performance with others and designate a field site where they will immerse themselves in day to day goings-on.

THE 270 Rollins Improv Institute: Level II: Level Two of the Rollins Improv Institute is designed for students with improvisational theatre experience who are looking to expand their toolkit and pursue more nuanced scene work. Incorporating the teachings of Spolin, Johnstone, and Boal, alongside the signature Rollins style, this course pushes the boundaries of improvisational performance. Prerequisite: THE 170 or equivalent experience. (Summer Course)

THE 295 History of American Theatre: The history of American theatre from 1665 to the present day. Examines trends, productions, dramatic texts, and theatre personnel who have helped to shape theatre in America.

THE 321 Scene Design: Applies creative concepts, text analysis, research, and visual communication techniques to scenic design. Draws texts from varying time periods and styles. Develops drawing and painting skills. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 211, or consent.

THE 322 Lighting Design: Applies creative concepts, text analysis, research, and visual communication techniques to lighting design projects in varying mediums. Develops drafting skills. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 211, or consent.

THE 323 Costume Design: Applies creative concepts, text analysis, research, and visual communication techniques to costume design. Draws texts from varying time periods and styles. Develops drawing and painting skills. Prerequisites: THE 111 and THE 211, or consent.

THE 324 Sound Design: Explores the role of sound in theatrical production as both an artistic and technical discipline. Develops a working knowledge of the equipment and vocabulary associated with theatrical sound. Integrates this working knowledge with the artistic theory and practical application of designing sound for the theatre. Prerequisite: THE 111 or consent.

THE 325 Improvisational Theatre II: Focus and Spontaneity: Explores a specific area of improvisational performance such as focus and spontaneity, characterization and status, physicality and environment, verbal skills and styles, or long-form and advanced structures. May be repeated for credit. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: THE 225 or consent.

THE 328 Fundamentals of Playwriting: Critiques student scripts and established work. Stages scenes from student plays or exercises in collaboration with acting/directing courses.

THE 331 Acting III: Period Styles: Explores acting in various periods and styles through reading, research, and scene work. Expands performer's agility through exercises in physical theatre and mask work. Requires journals reflecting research. Prerequisite: THE 233 or consent.

THE 333 Directing I: Fundamentals: Introduces directing terminology, formulation of ground plan, communication with actors, and concepts such as visual pause, beats, and blocking. Requires students to prepare exercises and scripted scenes from contemporary plays. Prerequisites: THE 111, THE 133, THE 201, and THE 211.

THE 336 Theatre for Social Change: Introduces and explores modern theatrical practices that utilize performance to facilitate heightened social awareness and/or change. May consider a variety of performance practices, such as: theatre of the oppressed, community-based theatre, psycho/sociodrama, theatre-in-education, and playback theatre. Prerequisite: THE 133, or THE 225, or consent.

THE 337 Voice III-Dialects: Covers the process of speech mechanics associated with patterns of speech other than Standard American. Requires knowledge of the International Phonetic Alphabet and Standard American Speech. Prerequisite: THE 136 or consent.

THE 340 Rollins Improv Players Laboratory: An improvisatory laboratory for students interested in exploring the boundaries of spontaneous and service-centered performance. Prerequisite: audition and consent. Graded on a credit/no-credit (CR/NC) basis. May be repeated for credit.

THE 341 History of the Theatre I: Surveys major periods beginning with classical Greek, focusing on theatre architecture, styles of production, key personalities, and relationship of dramatic literature to production styles. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 342 History of the Theatre II: Continues the survey of major periods to the present day, focusing on theatre architecture, styles of production, key personalities, and relationship of dramatic literature to production styles. Suitable for nonmajors.

THE 343 Dramatic Theory and Criticism: Surveys important trends in performance theory and criticism from the pre-Socratic and Plato, to postmodernism and queer theory. Examines the ways in which the art of representation has been viewed, pursued, and misconstrued. Prerequisite: THE 210 or consent.

THE 344 Introduction to Theatre Administration: Examines the business of theatre in its many forms, from for-profit producing entities to the lone arts entrepreneur. Explores administrative careers available within theatre organizations, practical skills necessary to succeed, and current trends affecting arts administrators. Throughout, the course deploys the tools of theatre to develop leadership and communication competencies.

THE 350 Topics in Theatre: Explores practitioners, theorists, and historians in the field of theatre and dance. Second Stage series is the capstone of the course -- student directed, designed, and performed productions in the Fred Stone Theatre.

THE 355 Acting for Musical Theatre II: Continued investigation into textual/lyric analysis and history, and context of different writing styles (including classical aria, 19th-century patter song, American standard, and Broadway and West End musical). Emphasis on musical theatre theory and terminology, text and sub-textual characterization, and the audition process. Prerequisite: THE 255 or consent.

THE 360 Forbidden Acts: The Queer Aesthetic in 20th Century Theatre & Film: Introduces students to aesthetics and theories through an examination of plays and films made by contemporary queer artists. Course develops students' abilities to read, view, and write about dramatic literature and film, as well as scholarly articles through a Queer Theoretical lens. Culminates in a performance piece that is conceived or adapted, rehearsed, and produced as a response to the material presented.

THE 370 Rollins Improv Institute: Level III: Level Two of the Rollins Improv Institute is designed for students with improvisational theatre experience who are looking to expand their toolkit and pursue more nuanced scene work. Incorporating the teachings of Spolin, Johnstone, and Boal, alongside the signature Rollins style, this course pushes the boundaries of improvisational performance. Prerequisite: THE 270 or equivalent experience. (Summer Course)

THE 391/392/393 Second Stage: Production: Departmental laboratory for student directors, designers, stage managers, and performers. Provides hands-on experience in all areas related to the production of a play. Prerequisite: consent.

THE 418/419, 420/421 Theatre Production Technical A/B, C/D: Provides practical experience in technical/design work on major productions at Annie Russell Theatre. Assigns students to crews: scenic construction, props, painting, stage management, lights, sound, costumes, and make-up. Requires minimum 10 hours per week and attendance at weekly production meetings. Note: Majors must work in each of the following four areas: painting/props, stage management/lighting/sound, costumes/make-up, and scenic construction.

THE 422/423, 424/425 Theatre Production Performance A/B, C/D: Offers practical rehearsal/performance experience for major production at Annie Russell Theatre. Requires journal and final character analysis. Prerequisite: consent.

THE 433 Directing II: Advanced: Focuses on artistic collaboration, historical research, themes, and directorial vision. Emphasizes preparation and presentation of period scenes: Greek/Roman, Shakespearean, absurdist, and postmodern. Culminates in presentation of scenes for public viewing. Prerequisite: THE 333.

THE 440 Senior Studio Workshop: Prepares students for postgraduate study by developing auditions and portfolios. Culminates in public presentations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent.

THE 480 Theatre Capstone: Serves as the culminating project, performance, or document for theatre majors in the acting, musical theatre, directing, theatre studies, or dramaturgy concentrations. With approval and guidance from faculty, students may elect to complete their capstone experience as a portfolio, performance, or critical/historical document.

THE 481 Design/Technical Theatre Capstone: Focuses on designing and developing an aesthetically pleasing portfolio that incorporates a capstone and demonstrates the student's capabilities and achievements for presentation at graduate school and professional interviews. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent.

THE 398-399, 498-499 Senior Project/Research/Internship/Tutorial: Offers four types of individual study:

  • Senior Project -- Focuses on independent production project in acting, directing, design/technical theatre, or management. A comprehensive examination is given in the spring term of the senior year. Prerequisites: senior standing and theatre major.
  • Research Project -- Involves independent research in theatre history, criticism, literature, design, playwriting, acting, or directing. Culminates in major research paper. Prerequisites: junior standing and theatre major
  • Internship -- Places student with professional performing arts organization for one semester. Host or faculty advisor monitors student's work. Prerequisites: junior/senior standing, theatre major, and approval by career services and department in semester prior to enrollment.
  • Tutorial -- Involves intensive research, writing, or production with instructor. May not duplicate regular course offering. Meets weekly and requires presentation and exam. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent.

Dance (minor only)

This program gives students the opportunity to experience dance as an art form. They can take studio classes in ballet, jazz, tap, and modern dance, as well as courses in history, notation, and composition. Minors develop an awareness of history, an understanding of composition, and a competency in several forms.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

 Seven (7) courses are required, three (3) core courses and four (4) electives.

CORE COURSES

  • DAN 203 Dance History
  • DAN 230 Dance Teaching Method
  • DAN 300 Dance Composition

ELECTIVES

Four (4) of the following courses are required.

  • DAN 155 Musical Theatre Dance
  • DAN 170 Ballet I
  • DAN 175 Tap Dance I
  • DAN 177 Jazz I
  • DAN 179 Modern Dance I
  • DAN 203 Dance History
  • DAN 225 Dance Improvisation
  • DAN 270 Ballet II
  • DAN 275 Tap Dance II
  • DAN 277 Jazz II
  • DAN 279 Modern Dance II
  • DAN 300 Dance Composition
  • DAN 370 Ballet III
  • DAN 377 Jazz III
  • DAN 379 Modern III
  • DAN 380 Studies in Dance
  • DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique
  • DAN 420 Dance Production I*
  • DAN 421 Dance Production II*

*DAN 420/421 are two-credit courses and both need to be taken to fulfill the elective requirement

Course of Study

 

DAN 135 Freedom to Move: Covers a variety of techniques that lead to more efficient use of the body. Methods learned will include various forms of dance and may also include Body Mapping, Alexander Technique, Nia, Laban, Body-Mind Centering, yoga, and Feldenkrais. Suitable for all students, particularly actors, dancers, singers, instrumentalists, and athletes.

DAN 155 Musical Theatre Dance: Provides an understanding of the structure of musical stage choreography and an insight into the skills necessary to perform that choreography. Students will expand their technical abilities by studying and learning a variety of choreographic styles of major musical theatre choreographers.

DAN 170 Ballet I: Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background of ballet.

DAN 175 Tap: Explores the fundamentals, vocabulary, and historical background of tap dancing.

DAN 177 Jazz I: Provides a sequence of physical experiences designed to introduce the fundamentals, vocabulary and historical background of jazz dance.

DAN 179 Modern Dance I: Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background of modern dance.

DAN 203 Dance History: Studies the history of dance from antiquity to 20th century. Examines the social, political, and cultural forces on the development of early and current dance theories and practices that have led to the art of dance as we know it today.

DAN 270 Ballet II: A continuation of ballet with an increase in the level of technical difficulty, historical research, critical studies, and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: DAN 170 or consent.

DAN 275 Tap Dance II: A continuation of tap dancing with an increase in the level of technical difficulty. Prerequisite: DAN 175 or consent.

DAN 277 Jazz II: A continuation of jazz dance with an increase in the level of technical difficulty. Prerequisite: DAN 177 or consent.

DAN 279 Modern Dance II: A continuation of modern dance with an increase in the level of technical difficulty, historical research, critical studies, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: DAN 179 or consent.

DAN 300 Dance Composition: Introduces dance composition. Highlights personal invention, solo and group focus, and evaluative process in basic choreography. Includes readings and writings on choreographers and choreography. May be repeated for credit. Intended for dance minors. Prerequisite: DAN 394 or consent.

DAN 370 Ballet III: Provides an increased level of technical difficulty. Attention is given to alignment, musicality and a broader knowledge of ballet terminology. 

DAN 377 Jazz III: Explores an increased level of technical difficulty. Attention is given to alignment, musicality and a broader knowledge of jazz dance vocabulary.

DAN 379 Modern III: Provides an increased level of technical difficulty. Attention is given to alignment, musicality and a broader knowledge of modern dance vocabulary.

DAN 380 Studies in Dance: Delves into particular period, choreographer's work, or special issue, depending on interest of students and faculty. May be repeated for credit.

DAN 394 Intermediate/Advanced Dance Technique: Offers heightened movement experience with greater emphasis on technical development and performance. Includes weekly classes in ballet, jazz, and modern dance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent.

DAN 420 Dance Production I: Designed to prepare students to conceptualize as choreographers and producers of the annual fall dance concert which is produced during the fall semester. The students will be guided through the process of dance production which includes elements of composition, costumes, music, and lighting design.

DAN 421 Dance Production II: This class prepares students as choreographers and producers of the fall dance concert. The students will be guided through the process of dance production which includes elements of composition, costumes, music, and lighting design. Prerequisite DAN 420