Social Entrepreneurship

Social Entrepreneurship


Changes effective Fall Term 2018

Alam Balzac
McInnis
Warnecke

Faculty teaching Social Entrepreneurship courses include members of 14 academic programs in the College of Liberal Arts. Please see the schedule of classes for each academic term for specific assignments.

The Social Entrepreneurship major highlights the business of changing the world. The major combines practical business knowledge, entrepreneurial skills, and understanding of current economic, political, cultural, and environmental issues. The program positions you to find--or create--careers that apply innovative and sustainable solutions to the world's most pressing challenges. It enables you to build a career out of making the world a better place, and learn transferable tools for creating change across public, private, and non-profit sectors. A Social Entrepreneurship minor is also offered to complement a major in any discipline.

The Social Entrepreneurship (SE) program is grounded in Rollins' commitment to educate students for global citizenship and responsible leadership, preparing graduates to pursue meaningful lives and productive careers.  The SE program is anchored in the Rollins values of Excellence, Innovation, and Community and the AACSB-International values of Innovation, Impact, and Engagement.  The program provides opportunities for students to develop a strong set of basic business skills combined with an understanding of current economic, political, cultural, and environmental issues consistent with the Carnegie Foundation’s (2012) definition of the purpose of liberal learning “…to enable students to make sense of the world and their place in it, preparing them to use knowledge and skills as a means toward responsible engagement with the life of their times.”

Key themes of the Social Entrepreneurship program are

  • The Primacy of the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) in decision making
    1. Economic growth and development,
    2. Social responsibility and ethics, and
    3. Environmental sustainability
  • Contemporary theories, practices, content, and applications in business from the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK)
  • The global, ethical, responsible, economic, social, environmental, legal, and technological implications of course content
  • Problem solving through analysis, critical thinking, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship through classwork and community engagement
  • Applied liberal arts skills (analytic, reflective, and strategic thinking; problem solving; legal and ethical reasoning, quantitative reasoning; and effective communication)
  • Leadership, interpersonal communication, coordination, cooperation, conflict resolution, teamwork, and team building
  • Application of information technology skills for research, composition, communication, calculation, and presentation 
  • Broad global and strategic perspectives on contemporary business, social, and environmental issues
  • Reflective examination of self in relation to the global and local communities, and to the diversity of people with whom they will work
  • Application of knowledge through experiential learning opportunities (internships, service learning, community engagement, business projects, and case studies)

 

The Social Entrepreneurship Major

The Social Entrepreneurship (SE) major requires fifteen (15) courses, including twelve (12) core courses, three (3) elective courses, an immersion experience, and a global experience.

The major is compatible with the 3/2 program of the Crummer Graduate School of Business, in which students earn a B.A. and MBA in 5 years.

CORE COURSES (12 courses)

  • SE 100 Social Entrepreneurship: Leading Change
  • SE 220 Global Development Challenges and Opportunities
  • ECO 121 Economics of Contemporary Issues
  • ECO 221 Statistics for Economics
  • BUS 230 Financial and Managerial Accounting
  • BUS 245 International Organizational Behavior
  • SE 300 Law & Ethics of Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship
  • SE 305 Social Entrepreneurship Marketing
  • SE 320 Strategies for Changemakers OR COM 331 Communication and Social Change
  • SE 315 Ethical Sourcing, People & the Planet
  • SE 345 Financing Social Entrepreneurship
  • SE 340 Designing and Planning for Social Entrepreneurship

ELECTIVE COURSES (Choose three; at least two at the 300-400 level, 12 hours)

The electives enable students either to design an ‘impact track’ targeting their personal SE passion (health, education, environment, development, poverty, inequality, gender, race/ethnicity, etc.) or to broaden their understanding of a variety of issues.  Social Entrepreneurship faculty can assist students interested in designing an ‘impact track’. 

  • ANT 215 Human Ecology
  • ANT 277 Gender in the Middle East and North Africa
  • ANT 360 Anthropology and the Environment
  • CMC 310 Media, Peace, and Justice
  • CMC 320 Political Economy of Body and Food 
  • CMC 325 Incarceration and Inequality
  • COM 325 Communication Campaigns
  • COM 340 Health Policy and Advocacy Communication
  • COM 355 Global Health Communication
  • ECO 126 Economics & Public Policy
  • ECO 181 Engines of Economic Changes: Making Innovation Work for Social Progress
  • ECO 202 Economics in Historial Perspective
  • ECO 239 Women and Work
  • ECO 351 Economic Development*
  • ECO 355 Environmental Economics*
  • ECO 370 Economics of Piracy*
  • ECO 385 Economics of Health*
  • EDU 271 School and Society
  • EDU 280 Diversity in American Education 
  • EDU 347 Global Perspectives in Education
  • EDU 385 Teaching Students with Special Needs
  • ENV 289 Nature in the City
  • ENV 292 Political Economy of Environmental Issues
  • ENV 302 Traditional Town Planning
  • ENV 348 Sustainable Development
  • ENV 353 National Parks and Protected Areas
  • ENV 365 Environment and Development in Central America
  • HIS 311 History of American Sexuality
  • HIS 370 Race and Ethnicity in America
  • PHI 290 Medical Ethics
  • POL 302 The Politics of Global Poverty*
  • POL 330 Peace and Conflict Studies
  • POL 332 International Human Rights
  • POL 333 Case Studies in Sustainable Development*
  • PSY 211 Social Psychology*
  • REL 228 Women and Religion*
  • REL 300 Religion and the Body*
  • SE 190 Special Topics
  • SE 290 Special Topics
  • SE 302 Indigenous Entrepreneurship
  • SE 310 Human Centered Design Thinking
  • SE 335 Markets for the Poor
  • SE 325 Globalization and Gender
  • SE 390 Special Topics
  • SOC 111 Social Problems
  • SOC 324 Women in Society*
  • SOC 345 Sociology of Gender*
  • SOC 346 Sexualities*
  • SOC 350 Class Inequalities*
  • SOC 355 Race and Ethnic Relations*
  • SOC 356 The State of Black America*
  • SOC 360 Poverty and Social Welfare*
  • SWAG 205 Introduction to Sexuality, Women’s, and Gender Studies

  *additional prerequisite may be required

IMMERSION EXPERIENCE

All SE majors are required to participate in one immersion experience. This requirement may be satisfied by participating in (a) a Rollins Immersion program, or (b) an international service learning experience approved by the SE director. Rollins Immersion exposes students to critical cultural, social, political and structural issues in the community through weekend and weeklong projects of civic and community engagement throughout the academic year. Rollins Immersion is rooted in the academic mission of Rollins to educate students for global citizenship and responsible leadership. Through direct community engagement, leadership development, multicultural education, discussion and pre/reflection activities students will be immersed in the big challenges and questions that face communities in the 21st Century.  International service learning experiences also focus on social responsibility and enable students to practice ‘global citizenship’ while engaging in service in a different culture. Students should document their immersion experience, and may be required to provide supporting evidence or write an essay describing their experience.

GLOBAL EXPERIENCE

All SE majors are required to have a global experience. This requirement may be satisfied by: (a) participating in a Rollins semester abroad program, (b) participating in an approved Rollins study abroad course, (c) by experience as an international student studying in the U.S., or (d) by extensive experience living or working abroad at age 16 or older. Students may be required to document their global experience.

RESIDENCY AND DISTRIBUTION
SE majors must take all core courses at Rollins (except for courses taken by transfer students prior to admission to Rollins); at least one-half of all courses for the major at Rollins (no exemption for transfer students); and at least one-half of all courses for the major at the 300-400 level


SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP MINOR REQUIREMENTS

The Social Entrepreneurship minor may be combined with any major except Social Entrepreneurship (SE). The Social Entrepreneurship minor requires six (6) courses (24 credit hours), including five (5) courses listed below plus one elective from the list of approved electives (see above).

  • SE 100 Social Entrepreneurship: Leading Change
  • SE 220 Global Development Challenges and Opportunities
  • SE 320 Strategies for Changemakers OR COM 331 Communication for Social Change
  • SE 345 Financing Social Entrepreneurship
  • SE 340 Designing and Planning for Social Entrepreneurship

 

Courses of Study

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSES (SE)


SE 100 Social Entrepreneurship: Leading Change (4 credit hours): Students will examine the historical and current movement of social entrepreneurship, and explore social entrepreneurship in the context of global and local social issues and personal motivational fit. Critical entrepreneurial skills will be enhanced, such as creativity, innovation, resilience, risk-taking, transformative communication, and teamwork.

SE 190 Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): Course deals with significant economic, political, social, and ethical problems relating to social entrepreneurship.

SE 220 Global Development Challenges and Opportunities (4 credit hours): This course explores various international development challenges (poverty, health, trade, education, etc.) and examines public, private, nongovernmental, and social enterprise strategies to address these problems around the world.

SE 290 Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): Course deals with significant economic, political, social, and ethical problems relating to social entrepreneurship.

SE 300 Law & Ethics of Social Innovation & Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): Introduces the legal tools, frameworks, and implications of social innovation and entrepreneurship. Students will learn ethical theories, basic legal content (constitutional, international, employment, marketing, intellectual property, contract, and environmental), and legal status options for changemaking organizations. Students will analyze international social, environmental and economic movements shaping law and policy.

SE 302 Indigenous Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): Indigenous entrepreneurship intersects social and commercial entrepreneurship. This course provides an exploration of the human potential of effectual entrepreneurial thinking and actions to break poverty cycles resulting from systemic marginalization of indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: SE 100.

SE 305 Social Entrepreneurship Marketing (4 credit hours): This course provides an introduction to marketing for social enterprises, non-profits and socially responsible businesses. It includes opportunity-risk recognition, blended-value, value co-creation, situational-marketing analysis, segmentation-targeting-positioning, pricing distribution channels, and marketing communication strategies. Prerequisite: SE 100 and ECO 121.

SE 310 Human Centered Design Thinking (4 credit hours): Students will examine the theories behind the models of Human Centered Design Thinking and focus on building HCDT facilitation skills.  Prerequisite: SE 100.

SE 315 Ethical Sourcing, People & the Planet (4 credit hours): Considers how social enterprise sourcing decisions impact human rights and environmental sustainability, disadvantaged populations, and compliance with international standards for equitable development. Examines best practices, strategies for cross-sector partnerships, and measurement of social impact. Prerequisite: SE 220 and SE 300.

SE 320 Strategies for Changemakers (4 credit hours): This course prepares students to be effective changemakers while they learn best practices of social innovation and entrepreneurship. Students learn how to identify contemporary issues and problems by studying social movements, researching the history of the issues, and analyzing strategies and systems. Students will participate in a community engagement component, where they will interact with local social entrepreneurs and mentors, and then build a tangible solution to a specific problem. Prerequisite: SE 100.

SE 325 Globalization and Gender (4 credit hours): This course investigates how globalization interrelates with gender norms and socioeconomic outcomes. It considers economic, political and cultural processes of globalization while exploring topics such as the effects of globalization on labor markets, migration, inequality, and international finance from a gender-based perspective. The course examines the social and economic impacts of increasingly-mobile capital and culture on different groups of men, women, and households. Prerequisite: BUS 233/ECO 121 or ECO 203.

SE 335 Markets for the Poor: Examines strategies for improving socio-economic inclusion for the poor in developing countries. Examples include distribution or production of consumer goods by the poor, insurance, healthcare, education, technology, and credit. Prerequisites: BUS 233/ECO 121 or SE 220 or instructor permission.

SE 340 Designing and Planning for Social Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): This course examines and applies concepts of problem identification and problem solving, IDEO process, business model, eco-systems, design systems thinking and strategies for developing and pitching the plan. Students will develop and present a venture plan. Prerequisites: SE 220 and SE 320; seniors only.

SE 345 Financing Social Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): This course introduces finance concepts in the context of social entrepreneurial decision making. We will examine various opportunities for funding social enterprises, including venture capital, venture philanthropy, and grants, and examine financial management dynamics. Students will learn about assessing and structuring investments in social enterprises; understand motivation for participating in such activities; build integrated financial projections as a part of a business plan; and explore how social impact is measured. Prerequisite: SE 100; MCMP competency.

SE 390 Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship (4 credit hours): Course deals with significant economic, political, social, and ethical problems relating to social entrepreneurship Prerequisites: junior/senior standing.

SE 398/399 Independent Study: SE Project (4 credit hours): This will entail designing and completing a social entrepreneurship project of the student's choosing, under guidance of a Social Entrepreneurship faculty member. Prerequisites: permission of SE program director.