Classical Studies

Classical Studies


Changes effective Fall Term 2017

Ewing Rubarth Vander Poppen

The program in classical studies embodies a tradition in learning and human understanding that began in the ancient world and became the core of liberal arts education. It also reflects intellectual and methodological developments that make the field exciting and relevant today -- not only for majors and minors, but also for students fulfilling general education requirements. In addition to language classes, the program offers a broad selection of courses in literature, philosophy, history, theatre, art, and archaeology.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Ten (10) courses are required.

GREEK CIVILIZATION CORE COURSES (one required)

  • CLS 103 The Greeks and the Good Life OR
  • HIS 130 History of a City: Ancient Athens

ROMAN CIVILIZATION CORE COURSE (required)

  • CLS 104 When in Rome: Identity and Empire in Ancient Rome

ELECTIVES
At least three (3) of the following, two (2) of which must be at the 300 level.

  • ARH 212 Special Studies: Ancient/Medieval Art
  • ARH 213 Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East
  • ARH 215 Art and Archaeology of the Greek World
  • ARH 217 Art and Archaeology of the Roman Empire
  • ARH 315 Topics in Ancient Art
  • CLS 232 Greek Mythology
  • CLS 305 Topics in Classical Studies
  • CLS 306 Topics in Classical Archaeology
  • CLS 321 Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity
  • CLS 322 Classical Religion: Paganism and the Death of the Gods
  • CLS 499 Independent Study
  • ENG 345 Classical Rhetoric Studies
  • GRK 391 Advanced Greek (may be repeated)
  • HIS 120 Decade of Decision: Caesar's Rome
  • HIS 374 The Dark Ages
  • LAT 391 Advanced Latin (may be repeated)
  • PHI 230 Greek Philosophy
  • POL 390 Ancient Political Theory
  • THE 241 Classical Theater

ANCIENT LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY
Students are required to demonstrate proficiency in an ancient language through the 202 (Intermediate II) level. To satisfy this requirement, students may take the Latin sequence. The Greek sequence will meet the requirement as well, but is offered on a tutorial basis only. Students with prior courses in Latin will be placed in the appropriate level according to the College's rules for foreign language credit. Students who have scored a four (4) or five (5) on the Advanced Placement (AP) Exam for Latin will receive one (1) elective course credit towards the major and will only be required to take a total of nine (9) courses and may not take LAT 101 for credit.

  • GRK 101/102 Introductory Ancient Greek
  • GRK 201/202 Intermediate Ancient Greek
  • GRK 391 Advanced Ancient Greek (may be repeated)
  • LAT 101/102 Introductory Latin
  • LAT 201/202 Intermediate Latin
  • LAT 391 Advanced Latin (may be repeated)

CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE
At least one (1) of the following.

  • Study Abroad
  • Archaeological Excavation
  • A Capstone Thesis (CLS 498/499) or Honors in the Major Field in Classical Studies

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Seven (7) courses are required.

GREEK CIVILIZATION CORE COURSES (one required)

  • CLS 103 The Greeks and the Good Life OR
  • HIS 130 History of a City: Ancient Athens

ROMAN CIVILIZATION CORE COURSE (required)

  • CLS 104 When in Rome: Identity and Empire in Ancient Rome

ELECTIVES
At least two (2) of the following, one (1) of which must be at the 300 level.

  • ARH 212 Special Studies: Ancient/Medieval Art
  • ARH 213 Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East
  • ARH 215 Art and Archaeology of the Greek World
  • ARH 217 Art and Archaeology of the Roman Empire
  • ARH 315 Topics in Ancient Art
  • CLS 232 Greek Mythology
  • CLS 305 Topics in Classical Studies
  • CLS 306 Topics in Classical Archaeology
  • CLS 321 Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity
  • CLS 322 Classical Religion: Paganism and the Death of the Gods
  • CLS 499 Independent Study
  • ENG 345 Classical Rhetoric Studies
  • GRK 391 Advanced Greek (may be repeated)
  • HIS 120 Decade of Decision: Caesar's Rome
  • HIS 374 The Dark Ages
  • LAT 391 Advanced Latin (may be repeated)
  • PHI 230 Greek Philosophy
  • POL 390 Ancient Political Theory
  • THE 241 Classical Theater

ANCIENT LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY
Students are required to demonstrate proficiency in an ancient language through the 201 (Intermediate I) level. To satisfy this requirement, students may take the Latin sequence. The Greek sequence will meet the requirement as well, but is offered on a tutorial basis only. Students with prior courses in Latin will be placed in the appropriate level according to the College's rules for foreign language credit. Students who have scored a four (4) or five (5) on the Advanced Placement (AP) Exam for Latin will receive one (1) elective course credit towards the minor and will only be required to take a total of six (6) courses and may not take LAT 101 for credit.

  • GRK 101/102 Introductory Ancient Greek
  • GRK 201/202 Intermediate Ancient Greek
  • GRK 391 Advanced Ancient Greek (may be repeated)
  • LAT 101/102 Introductory Latin
  • LAT 201/202 Intermediate Latin
  • LAT 391 Advanced Latin (may be repeated)

Course of Study


CLS 103 The Greeks and the Good Life:
Provides an introduction to ancient Greek history and culture by examining the central question in Greek Moral theory: "What is the Good Life?" Course provides a foundation for further studies of ancient Greek literature, history, and philosophy.

CLS 104 When in Rome: Identity and Empire in Ancient Rome: An introduction to the history, literature, and culture of ancient Rome focusing on issues of changing identity from the foundation of the Roman state (8th century BC) to the conversion of the Empire to Christianity (4th century AD).

CLS 105 Ancient Rome in Contemporary Film and Media: Introduces Roman history, politics, and culture through film, television, and popular fiction. Examines how cinema and popular media affect our understanding of ancient Rome by contrasting primary sources and contemporary representations.

CLS 232 Greek Mythology: Plumbs content, structure, and function of myths in classical literature -- from depths of chaos to divine machinations to labors of heroes -- and examines them against background of ancient religion. Draws upon primary literary sources in translation supplemented by materials drawn from ancient art and archaeology and later retellings in literature and art. Recommended for nonmajors.

CLS 305 Topics in Classical Studies: Focuses on such interdisciplinary topics as roots of Western sexuality, Greek medicine, Roman law, and rise of Christianity. Suitable for upperclass nonmajors. May be repeated for credit.

CLS 306 Topics in Classical Archaeology: Approaches the classical world using the disciplines of archaeology, and art history. Courses will be geared toward exploring aspects of the Classical World through a topical lens such as urbanism, colonialism, slavery, food, or citizenship.

CLS 321 Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity: Studies status of women in Greek and Roman world as context for discussion of misogyny, same-sex relations, and sexuality in literature, art, and religion. Assigns English translations of original sources and modern scholarly responses. Suitable for nonmajors.

CLS 322 Classical Religion: Paganism and the Death of the Gods: Examines religious thought of ancient Greek and Roman philosophers, "mystery" religions, and radically new Christianity. Suitable for majors and nonmajors from history, religion, or philosophy.

CLS 498/499 Independent Study

GRK 101/102 Introductory Ancient Greek: Presents grammar and syntax of ancient Greek, Classical and New Testament. Aims for reading texts as soon as possible. Available as tutorial only.

GRK 201/202 Intermediate Ancient Greek: Reviews and strengthens grammar and syntax. Increases speed and facility in translating ancient Greek prose and poetry of Xenophon, Plato, and Euripides. Prerequisite: GRK 102 or equivalent (see instructor).

GRK 391 Advanced Ancient Greek: Translates ancient Greek texts chosen by students nd instructor. Prerequisite: consent. (may be repeated)

LAT 101/102 Introductory Latin: Emphasizes grammar, syntax, and translation of simple prose through oral and written exercises. Connects Latin roots to English words and introduces historical and cultural aspects of Roman civilization.

LAT 201/202 Intermediate Latin: Reviews grammar and syntax while expanding reading comprehension and speed and facility in translation. Prerequisite: LAT 102 or two to three years of high school Latin (see instructor).

LAT 391 Advanced Latin: Translates Latin texts chosen by students and instructor. Prerequisite: consent. (may be repeated)