Chemistry

Chemistry


Changes effective Fall Term 2017

Bernal Gregor
Habgood
Mosby
Park Patrone Riley

Chemistry explores matter and its properties, its physical and chemical transformations, and energy changes associated with these transformations. Bridging traditional humanities on one hand and modern physics on the other, chemistry is a central subject in a liberal arts curriculum. "Every aspect of our world today -- even politics and international relations -- is affected by chemistry," said Linus Pauling. Chemists search for new molecules in space; make new useful materials; solve problems of the environment, energy, health, and food production; and probe how organisms work.

The chemistry department offers a program of study leading to certification as a chemist by the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training and designed to develop critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills. Many graduates continue their education in graduate or professional school and become chemists, teachers, doctors, lawyers, biochemists, pharmacists, veterinarians, engineers, and business people.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

The chemistry program requires a sequence of courses. The 100-level courses introduce first-year students to the discipline and serve as prerequisites for future foundational and elective courses. To declare this major, a student must have a minimum 2.0 GPA in at least two (2) of the courses taken at Rollins listed on the major map.

CHEMISTRY MAJOR

 Fourteen (14) courses are required

FOUNDATIONAL COURSES

  • CHM 120 or 130 Chemistry I or Advanced Chemistry I
  • CHM 121 or 131 Chemistry II or Advanced Chemistry II
  • CHM 220 & 220L Organic Chemistry I
  • CHM 221 & 221L Organic Chemistry II
  • CHM 301 Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM 305 Physical Chemistry I
  • CHM 320 Analytical Chemistry
  • BCH 335 Biochemistry

DIVISIONAL COURSES

  • MAT 110 or 111 Applied or Calculus I
  • MAT 112 Calculus
  • PHY 120 or 130 General or Principles of Physics I
  • PHY 121 or 131 General or Principles of Physics II

DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES (selected from the following)

  • CHM 306 Physical Chemistry II
  • CHM 380 Instrumental Analysis
  • CHM 400 Advanced Analytical Chemistry
  • CHM 401 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM 417 Advanced Organic Chemistry
  • BCH 435 Advanced Biochemistry
  • CHM 460 Advanced Topics in Chemistry
  • CHM 498 Chemical Research I and CHM 499 Chemical Research II
  • CHM 445 Advanced Integrated Laboratory in Chemistry

NOTE
Students interested in earning an ACS certified degree are required to take either Chemical Research I and II or Advanced Integrated Lab, and ten additional credits from the departmental electives list. Students interested in graduate school in chemistry are strongly advised to earn the ACS certified degree with Physical Chemistry II (CHM 306) as one of their departmental electives and in consultation with the faculty encouraged to consider additional biology (biochemistry concentration) or mathematics and physics (material science) courses as appropriate.

Students interested in earning a non-ACS certified degree are required to take ten additional credits from the departmental electives list.


Recommended Sequence of Coursework

First-year students who have not had high school physics, or have deficiencies in mathematics and/or science background should consult with a member of the department.

General chemistry and mathematics courses are typically completed during the freshmen year. Organic chemistry and physics in the second. Students interested in studying abroad should consult with a member of the department no later than fall of the sophomore year. During the junior year students are advised to take a minimum of four courses at the 300 or higher level. Students interested in pursuing honors in the major complete Chemical Research I and II in the senior year in addition to any remaining foundational or elective classes.


CHEMISTRY MINOR

Six (6) courses are required.

FOUNDATIONAL Courses

  • CHM 120 or 130 Chemistry I or Advanced Chemistry I
  • CHM 121 or 131 Chemistry II or Advanced Chemistry II
  • CHM 220 & 220L Organic Chemistry I
  • CHM 221 & 221L Organic Chemistry II

DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES (10 credits)

  • CHM 301 Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM 305 Physical Chemistry I
  • CHM 306 Physical Chemistry II
  • CHM 320 Analytical Chemistry
  • BCH 335 Biochemistry
  • CHM 380 Instrumental Analysis
  • CHM 400 Advanced Analytical Chemistry
  • CHM 401 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
  • CHM 417 Advanced Organic Chemistry
  • BCH 435 Advanced Biochemistry
  • CHM 445 Advanced Integrated Laboratory in Chemistry
  • CHM 460 Advanced Topics in Chemistry

NOTE
Students interested in pursuing graduate studies or employment in a laboratory setting are advised to take CHM 320 as one of their electives.


Course of Study

CHM 120 Chemistry I: Basic inorganic chemistry, including atomic structure and periodicity, stoichiometry, inorganic reactions (acid-base, precipitation, oxidation-reduction, complexation), and modern chemical bonding theories. Lab required. For science majors.

CHM 121 Chemistry II: Continues introduction to chemistry by discussing bonding in solids and liquids, thermodynamics, acid-base and solubility equilibria, phase equilibria and colligative properties, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry and chemical kinetics. Lab required. For science majors. Prerequisite: CHM 120 or CHM 130 or consent.

CHM 130 Advanced Chemistry I: Chemistry course for science majors; involves understanding quantitative relationships and problem solving, so a strong mathematical background is needed. Topics include modern physical and inorganic chemistry focusing on atomic structure and periodicity, stoichiometry, and chemical bonding theories including quantum mechanics. Lab required. Prerequisite: instructor consent.

CHM 131 Advanced Chemistry II: Continues introduction to chemistry by focusing on intermolecular forces, thermodynamics, acid-base, solubility, and phase equilibria, as well as colligative properties, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, and chemical kinetics. Lab required. For science majors. Prerequisite: CHM 130 or CHM 120 and instructor consent.

CHM 220 Organic Chemistry I: Introduces the basic principles of organic chemistry including nomenclature, stereochemistry, physiochemical properties and reactions of carbon compounds. The laboratory (CHM 220L) will involve the mastering of modern laboratory techniques and instrumentation used in the synthesis, separation and identification of organic compounds. Lab required. Prerequisite: CHM 121 or 131.

CHM 221 Organic Chemistry II: Builds upon the previous semester of organic chemistry through the advanced study of carbon compounds from a reactivity, mechanistic, and multi-step synthesis perspective. The laboratory (CHM 221L) will involve the synthesis, separation and identification of organic compounds. Lab required. Prerequisite: CHM 220.

CHM 301 Inorganic Chemistry: Studies fundamental principles of coordination compounds including the use of symmetry in molecular orbital theory, physiochemical properties of transition metal complexes, and basic bioinorganic, materials and organometallic chemistry. Laboratory will involve the synthesis, quantitative and structural analysis of a variety of representative inorganic and organometallic compounds. Lab required. Prerequisite: CHM 221 or consent.

CHM 305 Physical Chemistry I: Studies chemical thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. Introduces the laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical and phase equilibria as well as solutions. Reaction kinetics is a basic treatment of reaction rates, mechanisms, and theories of why and how chemical reactions occur. Lab required. Prerequisite: CHM 121 or 131 or consent.

CHM 306 Physical Chemistry II: Studies quantum and statistical mechanics. Introduces quantum mechanics and symmetry and their application to chemical bonding, atomic, and molecular spectroscopy. Statistical mechanics is a basic treatment of the connection between microscopic states and thermodynamic properties. Lab required. Prerequisite: CHM 305.

CHM 320 Analytical Chemistry: Focuses on building quantitative skills and introduces the use of modern instrumental methods to characterize chemical systems. Topics include measurement basics, statistical treatment of data, electrochemistry, solution equilibria, spectroscopic methods, and separation techniques. Lab required. Prerequisites: CHM 221

 CHM 380 Instrumental Analysis: Studies the theory, design, and practical application of modern instrumentation used in chemical analysis. Applies a variety of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods as well as spectrometers (including mass spec, fourier transform infrared, and surface analytical techniques) to solve chemical, biochemical, and environmental problems. Covers basic electronics and the relationship between signal and noise in the context of building instrument models. Lab required. Prerequisite: CHM 320.

CHM 400 Advanced Analytical Chemistry: Deals with advanced treatments of simultaneous and complex equilibria, electrochemistry, spectrophotometric analysis, and separation methods. Prerequisite: CHM 320.

CHM 401 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry: Applies thermodynamics, kinetics, symmetry and group theory, and the theories of ionic, metallic and covalent bonding to the chemistry of nonmetallic, transition metal, organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 301.

CHM 417 Advanced Organic Chemistry: Provides a deeper understanding of reaction mechanisms and how these theoretical concepts are applied towards the synthesis of complex molecules and/or the development of novel reaction methodologies. Prerequisite: CHM 221.

CHM 445 Advanced Integrated Laboratory in Chemistry: Provides students with experience in advanced experimental approaches to solve complex and real world chemical problems. Projects involve perspectives, skills, and instrumentation from each of the divisions of chemistry. Prerequisite: consent.

CHM 460 Topics in Chemistry: Explores both theoretical and applied chemistry with an emphasis on primary literature. Topics vary based on sub-disciplinary interests of the faculty members such as medicinal chemistry, catalysis, environmental chemistry, food biochemistry, materials science, medicinal chemistry, nanotechnology, polymers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CHM 221.

CHM 498/499 Research I and II: Requires proposal of collaborative faculty/student laboratory project with required achievement of benchmarks and weekly meetings. Culminates in written thesis and oral presentation on work conducted. Capstone experience. Prerequisite: consent.