Art and Art History


Changes effective Fall Term 2017

Almond Dennis Hargrove Libby
Roe Ryan Simmons Vander Poppen
 

Students may major in art history or studio art. Majors take a set of core courses, then choose electives. Minors complete six courses in art history or studio art.

This sequence of required core courses enables students to develop skills, concepts, and critical awareness about art and society.

ART HISTORY

The art history major familiarizes students with the visual culture of societies from prehistory to the present day; strengthening students' understanding of art and culture by examining, analyzing and interpreting works of art as primary evidence in relation to historical events, politics, religion, social life, and other art forms; emphasizes the development of strong critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills; teaches students a variety of scholarly art historical and archaeological methodologies; prepares students for a variety of careers, including those in the arts and archaeology, and promotes visual literacy and interdisciplinary study of a diverse array of sociopolitical and theoretical issues.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Students are encouraged to pursue internships and Honors in the Major. Students may opt out of either ARH 201 or ARH 202 with an AP exam score of 4 or higher.  Transfer classes applied to the major will be considered on an individual basis.  Graduate programs in Art History require specialized language training; students should consult with their advisor about appropriate language options.  Graduate programs in the field of art conservations usually require applicants to have taken college-level chemistry through organic and have a strong studio art background.  See the departmental website for further information: http://www.rollins.edu/art

TWELVE (12) courses are required: six (6) core courses, three (3) intermediate electives, and three (3) advanced electives with breadth distribution in three of four areas: Acient/Medieval, Early Modern, Modern, and Global.

CORE COURSES

  • ARH 110 Introduction: Ancient-Medieval Art
  • ARH 120 Introduction: Renaissance-Modern Art
  • ARH 140 Introduction to Global Art or ARH 145 Introduction to African Art
  • ARH 402 Methodologies of Art History
  • ARH 404 Museum Studies Practicum
  • ART ____ 1 Studio Art Course

Courses in three (3) out of four (4) Areas

  • ARH ____ Ancient/Medieval (courses ending in 10's)
  • ARH ____ Early Modern (courses ending in 20's)
  • ARH ____ Modern (courses ending in 30's)
  • ARH ____ Global (courses ending in 40's)

ELECTIVES

  • ARH 160 History of Westn Architecture
  • ARH 212 Special Studies: Ancient and Medieval
  • ARH 213 Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East
  • ARH 215 Art and Archaeology of the Greek World
  • ARH 217 Art and Archaeology of the Roman Empire
  • ARH 222 Special Studies: Early Modern Art
  • ARH 223 Italian Renaissance Art
  • ARH 225 Northern Renaissance Art
  • ARH 227 European Barogue Art
  • ARH 232 Special Studies: Modern Art
  • ARH 233 European Art
  • ARH 234 American Art
  • ARH 235 20th-Century Art
  • ARH 242 Special Studies: Global Art
  • ARH 243 Fashion in Africa
  • ARH 262 Themes in Art History
  • ARH 315 Topics in Ancient Art and Archaeology
  • ARH 321 Topics in Early Modern Art
  • ARH 327 Rome: Caravaggio and Bernini
  • ARH 332 Topics in Modern Art
  • ARH 337 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
  • ARH 339 History of Photography
  • ARH 340 Topics in Global Art
  • ARH 341 African Art and Colonialism
  • ARH 350 Contemporary Art and Theory
  • ARH 366 Themes in Art History
  • ARH 367 Artists on Film
  • ARH 368 Picturing War
  • ARH 369 Women & Art

 

* Special Note about the General Curriculum: Only one general curriculum requirement from the group A, C, D, L, O, P, S may be double-counted to satisfy both the general curriculum and the major requirements.  See the Rollins College Catalogue for a comprehensive listing of all requirements.


MINOR REQUIREMENTS

The art history minor familiarizes students with the visual culture of societies from prehistory to the present day, strengthening students' understanding of art and culture through the analysis and interpretation of works of art as primary evidence in relation to historical events, politics, religion, social life, and other art forms. The minor teaches students a variety of scholarly art historical and archaeological methodologies; emphasizes the development of strong critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills; and promotes visual literacy and interdisciplinary study of a diverse array of sociopolitical and theoretical issues. The minor also supports and adds valuable knowledge and skills to majors such as studio art, history, philosophy, critical media and cultural studies, English, modern languages, and classical studies, and anthropology.

Six (6) courses are required: two (2) beginning courses, two (2) intermediate electives, and two (2) advanced electives at the 300-level or higher.

Core Courses (2 of 3 options)

  • ARH 110 Introduction: Ancient-Medieval Art
  • ARH 120 Introduction: Renaissance-Modern Art
  • ARH 140 Introduction to Global Art OR ARH 145 Introduction to African Art

Intermediate or Advanced Courses in three (3) out of four (4) areas

  • ARH ____ Ancient/Medieval (courses ending in 10's)
  • ARH ____ Early Modern (courses ending in 20's)
  • ARH ____ Modern (courses ending in 30's)
  • ARH ____ Global (courses ending in 40's)

STUDIO ART

The studio art major includes a core of foundation courses that introduce students to the fundamental concerns of the art making process. Advanced level courses build upon this foundation and provide each student the opportunity to create individualized programs that reflect his/her interests. Through both practice and theory, developing artists refine their skills and techniques, expand their creative and imaginative capacity, and develop critical and analytical judgment. The major culminates in a senior-year, juried group art exhibition at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum (participation is contingent on the quality of work produced). The rigorous process involved in preparing for a professional-level exhibition provides students with the practice necessary to be working artists while also preparing them for advanced study at the graduate school level.

Students declaring a studio major should contact their advisor or the Art and Art History Department chair (in cases where an advisor belongs to another department) to discuss course sequencing and to complete the degree-planning sheet.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Twelve (12) courses are required: Two (2) foundation courses, four (4) core courses, four (4) electives, and two (2) art history courses. Two (2) of the required four (4) electives must be at the 300-level or higher. A successful Junior Year Portfolio Review with all Studio Art faculty is required to be able to enroll in the Senior Studio capstone courses click here for requirements.

FOUNDATION COURSES

  • ART 110 2D Foundations
  • ART 120 3D Foundations

CORE COURSES

Studio Courses

  • ART 230 Introduction to Digital Media
  • ART 350 Contemporary Art and Theory
  • ART 440 Senior Studio
  • ART 450 Senior Seminar

Art History Courses

  • ARH 120 Introduction: Renaissance-Modern Art

*Students must complete one additional Art History course from the following list:

  • ARH 110 Introduction: Ancient-Medieval Art
  • ARH 140 Introduction to Global Art
  • ARH 145 Introduction to African Art

ELECTIVES
Two (2) intermediate studio courses at the 200 level or above, and two (2) advanced studio courses at the 300 level or above.


MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Six (6) courses are required: Two (2) foundation courses, three (3) electives, and one (1) art history. One (1) of the required three (3) electives must be at the 300-level or higher. At least one of these electives must be an approved Digital Media course.

FOUNDATION COURSES

  • ART 110 2D Foundations
  • ART 120 3D Foundations

CORE COURSES

Art History Courses - student must complete at least one of the following

  • ARH 120 Introduction: Renaissance-Modern Art
  • ARH 110 Introduction: Ancient-Medieval Art
  • ARH 140 Introduction to Global Art
  • ARH 145 Introduction to African Art

ELECTIVES
Two (2) intermediate studio course at the 200-level or above, and one (1) advanced studio courses at the 300-level or above. At least one of these electives must be an approved Digital Media Course.

DIGITAL MEDIA COURSES

  • ART 230 Introduction to Digital Media
  • ART 223 Graphic Design I
  • ART 323 Graphic Design II
  • ART 310 Introduction to Video Art
  • ART 295 Photo -- Technique, Form and Content
  • ART 300 Photography II
  • ART 392 Digital and Mixed Media Printmaking


Course of Study

ART HISTORY

ARH 110 Introduction: Ancient-Medieval Art. Examines the history of art and architecture in connection with the development of western cultures from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 120 Introduction: Renaissance-Modern Art. Examines the history of art and architecture in connection with the development of western cultures from the Renaissance to the present. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 140 Introduction to Global Art.  Introduces art from the Islamic world, South and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, Japan, Oceania, Africa, and the native Americas from early times to the present. Examines sculpture, painting, architecture, pottery, book arts, textiles, photography, and other visual art forms, emphasizing the relationship between form and function within an historical context. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 145 Introduction to African Art.  Introduces archaeological, historical, modern, and contemporary works of African art in their aesthetic, cultural, and historical contexts. Examines sculpture, masquerade, textiles, painting, photography, architecture, and personal objects. AAAS elective. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 160 History of Western Architecture. Traces the history of architecture in Western Europe and the United States from antiquity to postmodernity, emphasizing the relationship between form and function and the impact of social, political, and religious forces on the evolution of built environments across time. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 212 Special Studies: Ancient and Medieval. Studies on topics of Ancient or Medieval Art and Archaeology. Topics, geographic regions, and chronology vary by course. Suitable for non-majors. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap. ARH 213 Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. Overview of the major art historical and architectural monuments of ancient Egypt and the Near East. Themes include artistic canons, pyramids, royal art, art of daily life and death, temple and tomb architecture. Legacy to the art of classical Greece noted throughout.

ARH 215 Art and Archaeology of the Greek World. Introduces the archaeology of the ancient cultures of the Greek-speaking Mediterranean from ca. 3000 - 30 BC. Explores the culture of ancient Greece in an effort to become familiar with the cultural, social, and artistic baggage that this tradition still attaches to modern life.

ARH 217 Art and Archaeology of the Roman Empire. Studies the material culture of Roman society from the 8th century BC to its demise in the 4th century AD. Emphasis on the social, economic, and ideological structures played in creating a cohesive political identity across the Mediterranean, as well as the ways in which Rome, the first globalized culture, negotiated some of the same problems of globalization that we face today.

ART 220 Computer Aided Design: Students learn how to use CAD tools to create, prototype, and fabricate unique three-dimensional design solutions using Form Z, the 3D printers, and the CNC machine. Studio projects will be supplemented with readings, presentations, and discussions on contemporary design theory and practice. Prerequisites/Corequisites: ART 120/ART 110

ARH 222 Special Studies: Early Modern Art. Focused exploration of topics in art of the Early Modern era (c. 1300-1700). Topics, geographic regions, and chronology vary. Suitable for non-majors. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 223 Italian Renaissance Art. Survey of art and architecture in Italy, c. 1300-1600. Issues/topics explored include patronage, artists’ biographies, Humanism, Neoplatonism, and gender and sexuality in Renaissance art. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 225 Northern Renaissance Art. Follows evolution of painting techniques and styles during 15th and 16th centuries north of the Alps. Touches upon iconography and analogies between visual arts and contemporary humanist ideas. 

ARH 227 European Baroque Art. Survey of seventeenth-century art in Italy, Spain, France, Flanders, and the Dutch Republic. Emphasis on the impact of the Reformation and Counter Reformation and changes in economic and political systems on art and architecture. Suitable for non-majors.

ARH 232 Special Studies: Modern Art. Focused studies in European or American art from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Topics and periods vary. Suitable for non-majors. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 233 European Art. Overview of the major artistic movements and theories of 19th-century Europe, primarily France, Great Britain, and Germany. Examines the emergence of photography. Situates the arts in their social and political contexts. 

ARH 234 American Art: Overview of the major artistic movements and theories in art of 19th-century and early 20th-century 20th-century United States, with an emphasis on the role of the visual arts in defining a national identity.  AMST elective.

ARH 235 20th-Century Art. Examines the art of the 20th Century, from the avant-garde movements of the World War I era to the disappearance of the art object in the 1970s and '80s. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or instructor consent.

ARH 242 Special Studies: Global Art. Focused studies on art from the Islamic world, South and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, Japan, Oceania, Africa, and the native Americas. Topics, geographic regions, and artistic periods vary. Suitable for non-majors. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 243 Fashion in Africa.  Traces African fashion from cloth to everyday clothing and high fashion catwalks between the 19th century and the present. Surveys techniques of cloth production, pattern creation, and tailored styles across the continent. Explores how African dress reveals information about culture, history, political systems, religious worship, gendered relations, and social organization. AAAS, SWAG, and INB elective.

ARH 262 Themes in Art History. Non-chronological topics course that explores an artistic tradition through a thematic lens. Suitable for non-majors. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 315 Topics in Ancient Art and Archaeology. Focused studies in specific areas of ancient art and archaeology. Courses focus on recent problems or issues in the field, expose students to a variety of art historical and archaeological methods used to address those problems, and introduce students to research methods and tools required to conduct significant research projects within the discipline of ancient art and archaeology. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap. ARCH and CLS elective.

ARH 321 Topics in Early Modern Art. Seminar exploring art of the Early Modern era (c. 1300-1700). Topics, geographic regions, and artistic periods vary. Emphasis on critical reading of scholarly texts and development of students’ research and writing skills. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 327 Rome: Caravaggio and Bernini. Explores developments in painting, sculpture and architecture in the Roman 'High' Baroque through close examination of the art and lives of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio and Gianlorenzo Bernini.

ARH 332 Topics in Modern Art. Focused studies in specific areas of European or American art from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Topics and periods vary. All courses focus on recent problems or issues in the field, expose students to a variety of art historical methods used to address those problems, and introduce students to research methods and tools required to conduct significant research projects within the discipline of modern American art. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 337 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Explores the origins, rise, and impact of French Impressionism and Post-Impressionism in the context of French 19th- and early 20th-century history, art theory, and culture. Prerequisite: ARH 202 or instructor consent.

ARH 339 History of Photography. Introduces students to the major contributors, movements, and technologies of photographic history. Primary focus on cultural, social, aesthetic, and commercial implications of photography concurrent with its invention and development through up to the advent of digital photography. The photograph, as document and as aesthetic object, is analyzed through contemporary criticism, historical writing, and illustrated lectures.

ARH 340 Topics in Global Art.  Focused seminars on art from the Islamic world, South and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, Japan, Oceania, Africa, and the native Americas. Topics, geographic regions, and artistic periods vary. Emphasis on critical reading of scholarly texts and development of students’ research and writing skills. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap.

ARH 341 African Art and Colonialism. Studies late 19th- and early 20th-century African art within the context of European colonialism. Focuses on episodes of change and collection in Africa and display and reception in Europe. Pays particular attention to influence of European colonialism on pre-existing African artistic traditions, social structures, power dynamics, gender relations, and religions. AAAS and INB elective.

ARH 350 Contemporary Art and Theory. An examination of postmodern art and theory (1960-present) beginning with fine arts appropriation of popular culture in the 1960s and culminating with today’s pluralistic range of traditional to virtual media. Themes include temporary art forms, constructions of national, ethnic, and gender identity in a post-colonial world, and recent arts controversies and censorship issues. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ARH 366 Themes in Art History.  Non-chronological topics course seminar that explores an artistic tradition through a thematic lens. Suitable for non-majors. May be repeated for credit where there is not topical overlap. 

ARH 367 Artists on Film. Examines ways in which artists and creativity are depicted in film. These include "Frida," "Basquiat," and "American Splendor." Prerequisite: Sophomore status or instructor consent. SWAG elective.

ARH 368 Picturing War. Examines the historical contexts and rhetorical strategies of the imagery of war in the Western world, including painting, architecture, public monuments, and mass media. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or instructor consent.

ARH 369 Women & Art. Seminar exploring the intersections of feminist theory and art history. Covers art from antiquity to the present. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent. SWAG elective.

ARH 402 Methodologies of Art History. Examines the development and implementation of a variety of methodological approaches to the study of art history. Traces the history of art history as an academic discipline. Includes study of works of art and architecture from antiquity to the present.  Required for ARH Major.  Offered biannually.  Must be taken in Junior or Senior Year. Prerequisites: ARH 110 and ARH 120.

ARH 404 Museum Studies Practicum. Examines the development of museums, interrogates issues of display, and exposes students to professional museum work. Compels students to practically apply art history skills in service of a professional exhibition at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum.  Required for ARH Major.  Offered biannually.  Must be taken in Junior or Senior Year.  Prerequisites:  ARH Major/Minor and Junior/Senior Standing, or consent.

ARH 498/499 Senior Thesis. Strongly encouraged for students considering graduate school. Required for students seeking Honors in the Major Field. May be taken for two consecutive semesters.


STUDIO ART


ART 110 Two-Dimensional (2D) Foundations: Introduces students to various methods and concepts in the visual arts practice. Projects incorporate drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, and basic color theory. Required first course for studio art majors and minors. Appropriate for non-majors who wish to explore various media and basic visual art concepts.

ART 120 Three-Dimensional (3D) Foundations: Introduces fundamentals of three-dimensional (3D) design with an emphasis on spatial awareness, problem solving, and the development of ideas related to traditional and non-traditional approaches to making art. Readings, discussions, and group critiques complement the studio work. Suitable for majors and non-majors.

ART 215 Artist's Book: Concepts and Practice: Examination of the book as an art object. Develops basic bookbinding, typesetting, and printing skills through individual and collaborative studio projects. Suitable for majors or non-majors. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 221 Drawing and Composition: Develops basic drawing skills with an emphasis on principles of composition, proportions, linear perspective, and perception of form in space. Uses a variety of drawing materials, both traditional and contemporary. Experiential studio learning experiences with formal and informal critique sessions. Suitable for majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 223 Graphic Design I: Presents basic concepts and techniques associated with computer-based design. Emphasis is placed on the process of creative problem solving, research, and idea generation. Students will develop technical skills in this primarily computer based course using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator commercial software applications. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 230 Introduction to Digital Media: Introduces students to digital workflow related to the studio art process. Students will work with Photoshop, and various web design, video editing, and blog applications to create studio projects addressing aesthetic, formal, and conceptual issues. Suitable for majors and non-majors. Continuous access to a digital camera required. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 232/332 Special Studies in Painting and Drawing: Fosters technical improvement and critical thinking among intermediate and advanced painters and drawers. Studio work, individual and group critiques, and individual research. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120 andART 221, or consent.

ART 233/333 Special Studies in Sculpture: In-depth investigation of themes, trends, and/or processes specific and pertinent to contemporary sculpture. Topics vary. Substantial reading and discussions complement the studio work. Attention paid throughout the course to understanding and articulating form in space and to helping students develop personal ways of working alongside, and in response to, current issues in contemporary sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120 or consent.

ART 234/334 Special Studies in Photography: Focuses on topics relevant to both the contemporary and historical discourse surrounding the medium of photography and, at times, other lens-based media.  Seminar style course with heavy emphasis on relating assigned readings, lectures, and discussions to students' studio work.  Suitable for majors and highly motivated non-majors.  Prerequisite: Any course with an ART prefix or consent. ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 240 Studio Furniture Design I. Introduces the materials, processes, and evaluation of contemporary studio craft furniture design and construction through intensive studio projects. Readings and discussions offer further consideration of historical, conceptual, and theoretical frameworks. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 241 Sculpture I: Explores the range of what sculpture might be and investigates creative approaches to perception, making, and critical analysis. Assignments expose students to both traditional and contemporary concepts, methods, and techniques particular to the medium of sculpture. Readings, discussions, and group critiques complement studio work. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 243/343 Human Figure Drawing: Challenges intermediate and advanced students to incorporate human figures into artwork. Stresses studio exercises, such as gesture drawings and in-depth anatomical studies, as well as individual and group critiques, and discussions with individual research. Prerequisite for ART 243: ART 110, ART 221, or consent.  ART 110 and ART 120, and ART 243, or consent.

ART 251 Painting I: Introduces the basics of oil and/or acrylic painting techniques while encouraging development of compositional and conceptual language of intermediate students. Intensive studio work, individual and group critiques, and individual research. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 272 Relief Printing: Introduces intermediate level relief printing techniques such as letterpress printing, multiple color linoleum printing, and collagraph. Suitable for majors or non-majors. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 295 Photo I - Technique, Form & Content: Introduces technical best-practices in digital photography including camera and software operation, while simultaneously developing formal and conceptual image-making strategies. Emphasizes the practice of photography as a fine art through reading and discussion covering the medium's history. Suitable for majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 300/400 Photo II: Advances development of photographic technique and practice formed in Photo I through intensive semester-long, individual projects. Applies the rigorous study of critical theory through seminar discussions to enhance conceptual understanding of the role of lens-based media in contemporary practice. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 310 Introduction to Video Art: Introduces the medium of digital video with primary focus on locating video art in contemporary fine arts contexts, as opposed to and/or in conversation with broadcast media. Discusses the medium's history alongside the larger categories of other time and lens-based media such as film and photography, and covers concepts and theories related to these media. Basic image capture and editing techniques taught using industry standard software. Suitable for majors and highly motivated non-majors. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, plus ART 230 or ART 293 orART 295 or ART 300, or consent.

ART 315 Visual Journals: Examines identity and memory through the visual journal, a mixed media fusion of writing and art. Intended for creative thinkers wanting a practice of self-reflection and sense of community. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 323 Graphic Design II: Intermediate graphic design course stressing creative problem solving as applied to single and multiple page layout, as well as typography and website design. Strengthens students' graphic design portfolios while introducing Adobe, InDesign, and world wide web development software. Prerequisite: ART 223, ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 342 Sculpture II:Provides further investigation into the history of making and thinking in sculpture and raises questions pertinent to contemporary art. Explores new techniques and materials while honing familiar skills. Designed to help students become self-directed in their work. Group discussion of student projects, readings, slides, and video addressing current art practice are core to the class. Regular individual and group critiques monitor the progress of each independent project. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, and ART 241, or consent.

ART 350 Contemporary Art & Theory: Research and Process: Provides students a foundational understanding of seminal critical theory texts in relation to their intersection with studio art practice in postmodern and contemporary periods covering themes including Marxist, feminist and post-colonial critique, socially-engaged art, and media theory. Methods for establishing and maintaining a rigorous and sustained research-based practice through process-informed exercises and projects complement weekly readings and lectures. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 351 Painting II: Probes problems presented in Painting I. Features studio work, individual and group critiques, and individual research. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120 and ART 251, or consent.

ART 366F Field Study: Making Art in Scotland: Two-week field study trip to Edinburgh, Scotland, led by Rollins studio art faculty during the world renowned Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Students choose and complete two art classes offered by Edinburgh College of Art.

ART 380F Art in the City with Field Study: A first-hand look into the masterpieces of modern and contemporary art and artists in New York City. Students visit institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art, as well as galleries not seen anywhere else. Students produce artwork that responds to their experiences.

ART 391 Screen Printing: Students create portfolio based on an over-arching concept and create multi-layered images using drawing fluid, photo emulsion, autographic positives and photography. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 392 Digital and Mixed Media Printmaking: Reinforces the concept of printmaking through integration of traditional and non-traditional processes and tools. Mixed media projects develop students' visual design skills through integration of Adobe, Photoshop, traditional intaglio techniques, and lithographic printmaking. Suggested for majors, but suitable for non-majors. Basic knowledge of Adobe, Photoshop is required. Prerequisite: ART 110 and ART 120, or consent.

ART 440 Senior Studio: Concentrated, advanced study in art concepts and mediums. Students produce a unified body of work for display during the ART 450 Senior Seminar. Required course for studio art majors in fall of the senior year and for minors who wish to participate in the Senior Exhibition. Students must submit a portfolio for faculty review in the spring of the junior year to be admitted to this course in fall of the senior year.

ART 450 Senior Seminar: Addresses career issues and helps students gain practical skills necessary for careers in the arts. Students learn discipline-specific resume writing, compose artist's statements, create an artist's web site, and photographically document and prepare their work for exhibition. Students take part in Senior Exhibition and gain design and curatorial experience by assisting Cornell Fine Arts Museum staff in preparing and hanging of the exhibition. Required of majors in their final spring semester at Rollins and of minors who wish to participate in the Senior Exhibition. Prerequisite: ART 440.