HIP

High Impact Practices (HIP)

Excerpt from High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter

 George D. Kuh (AAC&U, 2008)

A Brief Overview

The following teaching and learning practices have been widely tested and have been shown to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds. These practices take many different forms, depending on learner characteristics and on institutional priorities and contexts. On many campuses, assessment of student involvement in active learning practices such as these has made it possible to assess the practices' contribution to students' cumulative learning. However, on almost all campuses, utilization of active learning practices is unsystematic, to the detriment of student learning. Presented below are brief descriptions of high-impact practices that educational research suggests increase rates of student retention and student engagement. The rest of this publication will explore in more detail why these types of practices are effective, which students have access to them, and, finally, what effect they might have on different cohorts of students.  high-impact practices that educational research suggests increase rates of student retention and student engagement.

Excerpt from High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter

By George D. Kuh

 

These “high-impact” practices, when done well, engage students by helping them to make their own discoveries and connections, grapple with “big” questions whose importance they can see, and address complex problems.  http://www.aacu.org/meetings/faculty/2010/index.cfm

 

are a set of teaching and learning practices that have been widely tested and shown to be beneficial for college students from many backgrounds (Kuh 2008, Brownell and Swaner 2010)

These "high-impact" practices promise to engage today's college students to a greater extent than traditional classroom-based instruction alone. In a subsequent AAC&U report.

 

,) a High Impact Practice Advisory committee has been formed to help create a vision for integrating high impact practices across our campus. This group will serve as a think tank and information sharing advisory committee that will provide strategic recommendations on both micro- (programmatic) and macro-level issues in partnership with the key offices that oversee applied learning on our campus.

 

Ideally, the advisory group will meet once a month to discuss topics and questions such as:

 

·         How can high impact practices become more integrated into the curriculum?

 

·         What are the natural campus partnerships that can create seamless learning experiences for students?

 

·         What opportunities for shared involvement in LEAP learning outcome assessment exist for faculty and staff?

 

·         What national best practices are being reflected in our student learning and engagement opportunities?