Rollins College Music Department Handbook

National Association of Schools of Music Neuromusculoskeletal & Vocal Health Guidelines

 

Table of Contents

Mission Statement
History of the Virginia S. and W.W. Nelson Department of Music
Undergraduate Degree Programs

Declaring a Major in Music
Music Major Requirements
Music Minor Requirements
Curricular Policies 
Independent Studies 
Non-Departmental Performance Activities Policy 
Applied Music Courses and Policies   
Performance Class and Practicum Policies 
Ensemble Courses and Policies
Attendance Policies
Staff Accompanist Policies   
Concert Credit Policies  
Music at Midday Requirements
Junior and Senior Solo Recitals
Composition Recitals
Scholarship Policies
Facilities & Equipment Policies
Work Study Students
Student Societies
Forms

 

 

 

Mission Statement

Our mission is to provide the best possible musical education in performance, historical literature, and theory, within the scope and aims of a quality liberal arts institution.
Our goals include:

  • to provide young musicians the best possible education in performance, historical literature, and theory, all necessary to pursue graduate studies or a career in music;
  • to provide curricular studies in music to the wider campus community, making the study of music available to all;
  • to provide all music students the opportunity to experience courses that support other academic disciplines at Rollins, thus capturing the spirit of the liberal arts education;
  • to provide all students — musician and non-musician alike — multiple performance opportunities;
  • to provide the wider Central Florida community performances of outstanding merit by resident faculty, guest artists, and students, and to provide opportunities to study music avocationally through the Community School of Music.

College Wide Enrichment

Our intent is to bring to the campus and to Central Florida a wide variety of musically enriching activities. Such events support our music curriculum and our service to the Rollins community. We are especially committed to bringing to the campus guest artists and lecturers who help nurture a global perspective of the world of music. We are also committed to helping disadvantaged youth receive educational opportunities in music through scholarship programs in the Community School of Music.

Community School of Music

The Community School of Music trains the future concert professional, the dedicated amateur, and future audience members. Its atmosphere encourages the love of music, delight in creative expression, and the satisfaction of accomplishment through commitment and hard work.

History of the Virginia S. and W.W. Nelson Department of Music

The Department of Music at Rollins College began as a Conservatory of Music even before the College‘s founding in 1885 and is a charter member—since 1931—of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Conservatory enjoyed a reputation as one of the finer schools in the Southeast offering pre-professional training in music. That reputation has continued since 1966 when the Conservatory merged into Rollins as a liberal arts department. Keene Hall was built in 1974. In 1992 the Department was the recipient of a significant bequest from the estate of Virginia S. and W.W. Nelson for whom the Department is now named. Keene Hall was substantially remodeled in 2004-2005. This remodel not only completed a long time dream of providing newly renovated, as well as more space for the music students but also enhanced the ability of the community to enjoy outstanding visiting artists in the beautiful John M. Tiedtke Concert Hall. The Department continues the ongoing task of continuing to upgrade its equipment.

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Rollins College offers two undergraduate degrees: Artium Baccalaureus in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Bachelor of Arts in the Hamilton Holt School. The curricula for the music major and minor in both degrees is the same. The College‘s mission statement is clear about educating students beyond the narrow confines of a specific discipline. In that regard, the Department of Music encourages students to double major or to select non-music minors. Rollins graduates have double majored in varying ways including Music/Psychology, Music/Physics, Music/Education, and Music/Computer Science.

Declaring a Major in Music

Any student wishing to major in music at Rollins must pass an audition before a majority of the tenure track music faculty before approval can be given. The Department expects a certain level of expertise in an instrument or voice and the ability to read music before a student can declare music as a major. Enrollment in music courses does not qualify a student as a music major or minor.

The student who has declared the intention of majoring in music should have an appropriate member of the music faculty as his/her advisor. An incoming freshman who has been assigned a faculty adviser from another department should request reassignment after the Fall RCC course. Music majors in the Holt School are automatically assigned to Ms. Connie Holt.

An equally important reason for an A&S student to declare the intent to major in music at an early date is that the private lessons are then covered in the student's tuition. Over a four-year period an A&S student will have received the equivalent of $3,400 of extra assistance if he/she declared music as a major at the beginning of his/her music studies.

All music majors must take MUS 152 Music Theory II, MUS 153 Keyboard Harmony I, MUS 154 Keyboard Harmony II, and any prerequisite courses during the freshman year (at the very latest during the sophomore year) in order to be able to take the subsequent required courses.

Music Major Requirements

Please note: An audition before a panel of the tenured music faculty is required to gain acceptance into the music major.

Sixty (60) credit hours are required: thirty-two (32) in musicianship, twelve (12) in performance, and sixteen (16) in electives.

Musicianship Area ............................................................ 32 credit hours
MUS 151 Theory 1 (Harmony) with MUS 153 (Keyboard Harmony I) ....... 4+2 cr.
MUS 152 Theory 2 (Harmony) with MUS 154 (Keyboard Harmony II)....... 4+2 cr.
MUS 251 Theory 3 (Counterpoint) ....................................................... 4 cr.
MUS 252 Theory 4 (Chromatic Harmony) .............................................. 4 cr.
MUS 360 Music in the Global Environment ............................................. 4 cr.

MUS 361 Music History: Renaissance/Baroque ....................................... 4 cr.
MUS 362 Music History: Classic/Romantic............................................. 4 cr.

Performance Area ............................................................. 12 credit hours
MUA 200 Music Ensembles ................................................................ 4 cr.
MUA 201C OR MUS 201P OR MUA 301 OR MUA 401 Applied Music ........... 8 cr.

Music Electives .................................................................. 16 credit hours
Four (4) electives in music are required, three (3) of which must be at the 300 level or above.

Music Minor Requirements

Thirty-two (32) semester hours are required.

MUS 151 Theory 1 (Harmony) with MUS 153 (Keyboard Harmony I) ...................................... 4+2 cr.
MUS 152 Theory 2 (Harmony) with MUS 154 (Keyboard Harmony II) ..................................... 4+2 cr.
MUA 200 Music Ensembles .................................................................................................. 4 cr.
MUA 201C OR MUA 201P OR MUA 301 OR MUA 401 Applied Music.............................................. 8 cr.
Two (2) electives in music are required, one (1) of which must be at the 300 level or above ........ 8 cr.

Note: MUA 101 and 102 are enrichment lessons only.  They do not apply to the music major/minor program.

Curricular Policies

Registration for Courses

All classroom music courses have an MUS prefix; Both Arts and Sciences and Hamilton Holt students registering for these online.

Registration for Applied Lessons and Ensembles

Arts and Sciences (A&S) students and Hamilton Holt (HH) students: Registration for all applied lessons and ensembles is done through the Department of Music/Susan Throm-White. (NOTE: All applied lessons and ensembles begin with the MUA prefix.)

Registration for all vocal ensembles is to be done AFTER the student completes the audition process and is accepted into an ensemble. Auditions are held early during the first week of classes. It is the responsibility of the student to read Department-issued e-mails as well as posted notices in hallways and on bulletin boards in Keene Hall to learn when and where these auditions will take place. During the week of Drop/Add (the first week of school) registration notices and materials will also be located in the class room hallway on tables located in the area of the stage doors and stairway. It is the student‘s responsibility to look for these registrations and meet the posted deadlines. Please note: Deadlines are final. There are no exceptions.

Piano Proficiency Requirements

Each music major, regardless of degree program, must reach a minimum level of keyboard skill. These requirements are listed under Piano 101.

Music Theory Requirements

By the end of Harmony I (MUS 151), the student will be able to demonstrate familiarity with the rudiments of music theory (key signatures, notation, rhythm), harmonize a melody from a figured bass, analyze a piece of music using both Roman numerals and figured bass, and demonstrate facility in beginning counterpoint in all species. The student will be able to sing at sight a simple folk tune in all clefs. Please note: Harmony I must be taken no later than the first term, sophomore year.

By the end of Harmony II (MUS 152), the student will be able to demonstrate familiarity with seventh chords in a variety of situations, including secondary dominant and modulatory settings. Using skills developed through these two terms of harmony, the student will be able to make an arrangement of a folk tune using counterpoint skills to develop a good bass line and selecting chords which emphasize and support the harmonic direction of the piece. Sight-singing skill will include simple chromatic inflection along a diatonic line.

By the end of Counterpoint (MUS 251), the student will be able to write both two- and three-part counterpoint in all species, analyze inventions and fugues of J. S. Bach, compose the exposition of an invention on a given subject, and expand the contrapuntal language to the analysis of works of other composers, particularly those of the 20th century. Sight-singing skill will continue to increase and will include examples of late-Romantic and early 20th-century melodies. (Optional for Music Minors)

By the end of Chromatic Harmony and Introduction to Analysis (MUS 252), the student will be able to harmonize melodies using added 6th, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords, Neapolitan chords, and create a matrix of a tone row in order to compose a serial composition. Analysis of larger works of various periods will be affected. Sight-singing examples will include dissonant leaps and melodies which include modulation. (Optional for Music Minors)

In addition, all students will demonstrate facility in keyboard harmony as part of the keyboard harmony requirements. All Arts and Science students will fulfill these requirements by taking 151L and 152L as the lab section of their first year theory. Holt students will be required to take two semesters of applied piano 101/Keyboard Harmony to fulfill the same requirements. After two semesters of keyboard harmony, all students will be expected to play scales (two octaves) and cadences in all major and minor keys, harmonize a simple folk tune using I, IV, and V chords in keys up to 2 sharps and 3 flats, realize figured bass and to play three-and four-part scores that include alto or tenor clefs. Students must fulfill the keyboard harmony requirements no later than the spring of their sophomore year.

Independent Studies

Independent studies offer ―students an opportunity for specialized study and are meant to encourage intellectual curiosity, initiative, and sustained effort. Independent Studies (classified either as tutorials or research projects) must be sponsored by a faculty member, and approved by an academic department and the Office of the Dean of the Faculty. Proposal forms for Independent Studies are available (in electronic form suitable for download) on the Student Records web site (Rollins College Catalog). Please note: Students may not take core music courses as independent studies in lieu of regular classroom attendance.

Non-Departmental Performance Activities Policy

During your college career, we hope that you will have many opportunities to experience a wide range of musical and non-musical activities both on and off campus in order to strengthen your skills and resume.  For this reason, the Department of Music offers you over twenty ensembles which perform numerous concerts, productions, and outreach events throughout the academic year.  In order to create such a wide array of high-level performance experiences for you and your colleagues, we require that all music majors attend all rehearsals and performances for their ensembles.  As a Rollins College Music Major, it is your responsibility to check with your ensemble directors for all rehearsal and performance dates for the entire semester before considering any Non-Departmental activity.  If, after consulting with your professors, you find that your Rollins College performance schedules and courses may indeed coordinate with an outside activity, it is then your responsibility to gain approval from the Chair of the Deparment of Music.  This is for your protection as developing musicians, and for your peers' protection as fellow ensemble participants.  Failure to adhere to this policy may result in grade reductions or scholarship suspension. 



Applied Music Courses and Policies

Courses:

For the college there are currently five different levels of applied lessons:
MUA 101 – This level is a 30-minute, one credit hour lesson, graded CR/NCR. MUA 101 does not satisfy the applied requirements for music majors and is considered one of enrichment only. A tuition of $325 will be charged to all students enrolling for lessons at this level.

MUA 202 – This level is a 45-minute, two-credit hour lesson graded CR/NCR. MUA 202 does not satisfy the applied requirements for music majors and is considered one of enrichment only. A tuition of $425 will be charged to all students enrolling for lessons at this level. 

MUA 201C - All incoming college freshmen and transfer students who have auditioned before a panel of tenured music faculty of the Department and have been accepted as music majors begin applied lessons at this level. This provides twelve, two-credit hour, 50-minute lessons per semester.  To fulfill the applied grade, students studying at the 201C level will be required to perform for a jury at the end of each semester and attend a specific number of concerts during the semester (see Concert Credit Policies). Students in MUA 201C may not present a junior or senior recital under Department of Music auspices, although in certain circumstances the Reinhold Rehearsal Room (#119) can be used for an informal presentation.

Students continuing to study at the MUA 201C level will choose an area of concentration.  Current areas of concentration are Composition, Conducting, Contemporary Music, General Music Studies, History/Literature, Music Education, and Music Technology.  Once the concentration has been chosen, there will be specific classes and levels of proficiency to meet for each concentration. 

MUA 201P - The 'P' designates a student concentrating in the area of performance.  This Track may be requested by the instructor filling out and signing the appropriate space provided on the Jury Repertoire Form.  If the move to 201P is granted by the jury panel, the student is expected to begin training for a higher degree of proficiency in the area of performance and eventually petition to promote to the 301 level.  This provides twelve, two-credit hour, 50-minute lessons per semester.  To fulfill the applied grade, students studying at the 201P level will be required to perform for a jury at the end of each semester and attend a specific number of concerts during the semester (see Concert Credit Policies).  Students in MUA 201P may not present a junior or senior solo recital under Department of Music auspices, although in certain circumstances the Reinhold Rehearsal Room (#119) can be used for an informal presentation.

MUA 301 – Only a level 201P student who has successfully completed a promotion jury at the end of the previous semester registers for MUA 301. This provides twelve, two-credit hour, 50-minute lessons per semester.  To fulfill the applied grade, students studying at the 301 level will be required to perform for a jury at the end of each semester and attend a specific number of concerts during the semester (see Concert Credit Policies).  It is not a degree requirement for a student at the MUA 301 level to perform a junior or senior solo recital, but a level 301 student may petition to perform a junior or senior solo recital.  (Petitioning does not guarantee a solo recital will be granted.)

MUA 401 – Moving to this level of study is by Departmental invitation only. An invitation would be extended following a successful junior/senior solo recital. To fulfill the applied grade, students studying at the 401 level are required to perform for a jury at the end of each semester and attend a specific number of concerts during the semester (see Concert Credit Policies).  To fulfill the degree requirements, a student at the MUA 401 level is required to petition for and perform a junior and senior solo recital.

Policies:

Requirements for performance courses are guided by the syllabi of the studio areas, published separately. These syllabi are available on the brochure carousel outside office #153, located in the main class room hallway.

Grading Rubric – Department Applied Lessons

Instructor Applied Grade = 40%
Jury = 40%
Sight Singing = 10%
Concert Attendance = 10%
Performance Class Attendance = See Performance Class and Practicum Policies below for grading information.

Please note: If the student receives an “F” from the instructor, this will result in an automatic “F” in the course, even if the jury grade is passing. If the student fails to appear at a jury performance, this will result in an automatic “F” in the course, even if the instructor grade is passing.
Receiving an “F” applied music grade means the student can only take MUA 102 in the following semester and will need to re-audition in order to take a MUA 201C/P or MUA 301 applied music course again.

Applied Lessons Attendance Policy

At least 10 of the 12 scheduled lessons must be completed in order to receive credit for the course. No lesson time will be made up in which the student fails to appear without notice. Missed lessons may be made up under the following conditions:

  • if the instructor misses the lesson;
  • if the student cancels a lesson with 24-hours notice

Dropping an Applied Lessons Course

If during the semester a student drops an applied lessons course, it is the responsibility of the student to notify the teacher and to go to student records (Arts & Science students) or to the Holt Office (Holt students) to formally drop the class from your schedule. Failure of the student to formally drop an applied lesson course by reporting to the appropriate recording office will result in the student receiving a WF (withdrawal/failing) when final grades are posted.

Performance Dress

For Midday Concerts, Juries, Your Music at Midnight, and Ensembles at Midday, the dress code is as follows: Ladies may wear tea length dresses or skirts, slacks, and dressy shirts/blouses. Gentlemen may wear nice slacks and tucked-in dress shirts. Jackets and ties are to be worn at the discretion of the applied instructor. Hats or flips flops of any kind are unacceptable on the concert stage.

Ensemble instructors will set the  “uniform” for the group they direct.

Practice Time

With applied music study, the student must practice, even though it's sometimes lonely in the practice room.  A great benefit, however, is that it also teaches tremendous self-discipline - just one of the aspects that makes the music major graduate attractive to law schools and medical schools.  The National Association of Schools of Music mandates the following guideline for practice: “It is recommended that one credit hour be given for each three hours per week of practice, plus the necessary individual instruction…” This means for MUA 201C/P a student should count on putting in at least six hours of practice per week.  Your lesson is not a practice period or rehearsal. Your lesson is your opportunity to refine what you have been practicing all week.

Juries

At the end of every term all students enrolled in MUA 201C, 201P, 301, and 401 applied music lessons will perform before a Faculty committee. These juries are used for students’ ongoing assessment, serving as a final exam. Jury forms must be completed and turned in to Sherry Orr by the published deadline. If the Jury Repertoire Form is incomplete or late, vocal students will receive a 3% reduction and instrumental students will receive a 1-point reduction in the Instructor Grade portion of the final appled grade at the end of the semester. 

All singers and pianists must perform from memory. Other instrumentalists should strive to perform from memory, but this aspect will be left to the instructor’s discretion. Students will also be asked to play scales and/or arpeggios, sight-sing, or sight-read on their instrument.

Exceptions: Students that complete a junior or senior recital during the current semester are not required to perform a jury as the solo recital grade will be the jury grade. If a student that is preparing to present a recital does not pass his/her qualifying recital hearing, he/she will be required to perform a jury at the end of the semester.

Promotion to MUA 301

To be eligible to sign up for a 301 promotion jury at the end of a semester, a Petition to Promote form must be completed, signed by the student’s instructor, and turned in to Sherry Orr by the published deadline. The student must be prepared musically and technically to perform at these levels with a significant amount of repertoire in evidence. All applied music promotion criteria for voice/instruments are located in the brochure carousel located in the main hallway in front of office #153 and are available under the Areas of Study section of the website. If the Promotion Petition form has been signed by the applied teacher and accepted by the Department, the student will not sign up for a jury under his/her specific instrument, but rather, under the heading “PROMOTION JURIES”. If the Petition to Promote Form is incomplete or late, the student may be asked to wait and submit the petition during the next semester.  Promotion to MUA 301 or 401 is by tenure-track faculty approval only.

Performance Class and Practicum Policies

All Music Majors are required to attend performance classes and practicums on their major instrument and in their concentration as outlined below. 

  - 201P, 301, and 401 students are required to attend all performance classes on their major instrument.  Two (2) absences will be allowed throughout the semester without affecting the student's final Applied Lessons grade.  Every further absence will lower your final Applied Lessons grade on the major instrument by 2%.

  - 201C students with a Conducting or Composition concentration are required to attend 6 performance classes on their major instrument, and all practicum classes A total sum of two (2) absences (from performance class and practicum meetings) will be allowed throughout the semester without affecting the student's final Practicum grade.  Every further absence from performance class and practicum meetings will lower your final Conducting or Composition Practicum grade by 2%.

  - 201C students with any other concentration (if you are neither Conducting, nor Composition) are required to attend all performance classes on their major instrument.  Two (2) absences will be allowed throughout the semester without affecting the student's final Applied Lessons grade.  Every further absence will lower your final Applied Lessons grade on the major instrument by 2%.

  - 201C students who have not yet been accepted to a concentration (Freshmen or Transfer) are required to attend 6 performance classes on their major instrument, and 6 further classes (performance classes on any instrument, including your major instrument, or any conducting or composition practicum meetings) of their choosing, totaling 12 attended classes.  The "6+6" requirement offers Freshmen and undecided students a chance to further their repertoire knowledge and advance their skills on their major instrument, while allowing them to explore other concentrations.  If you do not attend 12 full classes, your final Applied Lessons grade on the major instrument will be lowered by 2% per absence.


Ensemble Courses and Policies

Ensembles:

The Department of Music offers a wide array of ensemble opportunities to the Rollins student body.  Available ensembles are listed below. (Please note: Not all ensembles are offered each semester.)

Bach Festival Choir*
Brass Ensemble
Chamber Singers*
Concert Choir*
Flute Choir
Guitar Ensemble
Horn Ensemble
Instrumental Chamber Groups
Jazz Ensemble
Mallet Ensemble
Men’s Choir*
Men’s Quartet*
Mixed Quartet*
Orchestra
Opera Workshop*
Opera*
Percussion Ensemble
Rollins Collegium*
Rollins Singers*
String Ensemble
Wind Ensemble
Women’s Glee*
Women’s Trio*
Woodwind Ensemble
World Music Ensemble

* denotes groups requiring an audition prior to registration

Policies:

Ensemble Requirements

Although only one ensemble each semester is required of the music major, scholarship recipients will be required to take two ensembles of the Chair's choosing.

Grading Rubric – Department Ensembles

Attendance = 70%

  • No ensemble can function without full and enthusiastic participation from all its members. Therefore, attendance counts for much of the grade.
  • If the ensemble meets once a week = one excused absence.
  • If the ensemble meets twice a week = two excused absences.
  • If the ensemble meets three times a week = three excused absences.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to clear in advance all absences with the director of the ensemble. All absences after the allowed number will reduce this portion of the grade by one letter.
  • Being late to a rehearsal, in the professional world, is not allowed. To help students achieve this standard, three late arrivals will equal one absence.
  • Please Note: Rehearsal schedules are published at the beginning of the term. Students with potential conflicts are urged to make them known as soon as possible.

Preparation = 20%

  • Students are expected to come to rehearsals prepared. Rehearsals are held to improve the ensemble, and this cannot happen without improvement in preparation. Evidence that a student‘s preparation is not improving incrementally will result in a lower grade in this area.

Participation = 10%

  • Attitude affects the productivity of a well-run rehearsal. Enthusiastic participation is expected.

Concert Performance

  • Failure to participate in the concert for which rehearsals have been held could result in an “F” in the ensemble. The only exception will be a documented personal injury or a documented family emergency.

Dropping an Ensemble Course

If during the semester a student drops an ensemble course, it is the responsibility of the student to notify the director and to go to student records (A&S students) or to the Holt Office (HH students) to formally drop the class from your schedule. Failure of the student to formally drop an ensemble by reporting to the appropriate recording office will result in the student receiving a WF (withdrawal/failing) when final grades are posted.

Attendance Policies

Please Note: The Department does not distinguish between unexcused and excused absences and students are strongly advised not to miss any classes, lessons or ensembles.

Courses

If it is necessary to miss class the policy is as follows: for classroom courses meeting 150 minutes a week, students may miss 150 minutes of class; i.e., up to three classes may be missed when the class meets three times a week and up to two classes may be missed when the class meets twice a week. Tardiness is a disruption. Any time a student is over ten minutes late for a class it will be counted as an absence. Three late arrivals of ten minutes or less will count as one absence. NOTE: The final grade in the course will drop four percentage points for each absence beyond the allowed number.

Applied Lessons

At least 10 of the 12 scheduled lessons must be completed in order to receive credit for the course. No lesson time will be made up in which the student fails to appear without notice. Missed lessons may be made up under the following conditions:

  • if the instructor misses the lesson;
  • if the student cancels a lesson with 24-hours notice

Ensembles

  • If the ensemble meets once a week = one excused absence.
  • If the ensemble meets twice a week = two excused absences.
  • If the ensemble meets three times a week = three excused absences.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to clear in advance all absences with the director of the ensemble. All absences after the allowed number will reduce this portion of the grade by one letter.
  • Being late to a rehearsal, in the professional world, is not allowed.  To help students acheive this standard, three late arrivals will equal one absence.

 

Staff Accompanist Policies

The Department of Music has a full-time staff accompanist whose duties are assigned by the Department Chair.  Music must be given to the staff accompanist seven (7) days before the first rehearsal.  If playing for a student solo recital, a set of the recital music is due to the staff accompanist on Friday of the third week of classes.  Due to the large volume of accompanying assignments, the staff accompanist cannot accommodate last-minute changes of performance repertoire.

Students must arrive on time to scheduled rehearsals.  There will be no make-up rehearsals due to tardiness.  Students must notify the staff accompanist 24 hours in advance, via email, if the rehearsal must be canceled due to illness.

Concert Credit Policies

Please Note: Concert attendance constitutes 10% of the applied music grade.
Music majors are required to attend fifteen (15) of the on-campus Music Department-sponsored music events each term, while music minors are required to attend eight (8) concerts each term.  Students receive concert credit for all events printed in the Department of Music brochure (with the exception of Community School Recitals), along with the events in the Bach Festival brochure.

Music majors may derive 6 of their concert credits through concerts they participate in, other student recitals, and midday performances (gold concerts).  The remaining 9 concert credits must be derived through attendance at Bach Festival performances, Master Classes, Visiting Artist Series concerts, Faculty Recitals, Jazz Series, World Music Series, etc. (blue concerts). The music minor concert credits are derived in the same way with the required concert credits numbering 3 gold and 5 blue.

Only one concert credit may be earned per program. For example, there will be three Vesper services in December, and although students will perform in all three, only one concert credit will be given since this is a repeat of the same program. The only off-campus event that earns a concert credit is Founder’s Day, which is held at the Congregational Church on a Sunday morning during the fall semester each year.

Each music major/minor will have a Music ID card. At each event where concert credit is earned, a work study student will be in the lobby 15 minutes prior to the start of the event and 10 minutes following the event to document the student’s attendance using the ID card. No exceptions will be given. The ID card is to be used only by the student to whom the card is registered.

Two concert credits may be earned by playing or singing a solo for the 11am Sunday Chapel service. A list of these services and a sign- up sheet representing the entire semester will be posted during the first week of school on the table in front of Rm. 135. Any music major or minor is eligible to play or sing for these services.

PDF Concert Credit Grading Tables

Music at Midday Requirements

The Music at Midday series is held on most Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12:30pm in the Tiedtke Concert Hall and programs last approximately 45 minutes. All music majors are expected to perform each semester with each instrument in which they are taking lessons at MUA 201P, 301, or 401.

Exceptions:

  • Students who are first-term freshmen, first-term transfer students, or are taking applied lessons at the MUA 201C level are not required to participate in midday performances.
  • Students performing a junior or senior solo recital during the semester are not required to participate in midday performances.

Each student is responsible for signing up to perform on a Midday concert. Sign-up sheets will be located on a table in front of office #135 during the second week of school with a clear deadline for sign-up being posted. There will also be announcements posted in the hallway, on the bulletin boards, and an email will be sent to all students regarding the availability of the Midday sign-up sheets as well as the deadline.

When the student signs up for a Midday performance date there will be a deadline date clearly posted as to when their completed Midday form is due. The student is responsible for turning in a completed Music at Midday form to Sherry Orr on its appropriate due date. “Completed” means all information is present, along with the applied teacher’s signature. (The only line on the form that can possibly be left empty is the line written in italics.) If the Jury Repertoire Form is incomplete or late, vocal students will receive a 3% reduction and instrumental students will receive a 1-point reduction in the Instructor Grade portion of the final appled grade at the end of the semester.

Junior and Senior Solo Recitals

MUA 401 – All students at this level of applied lessons during their junior and senior years are required to petition and present a solo recital in that instrument. These students are required to follow the steps and protocol listed below.
MUA 301 – All students at this level of applied lessons during their junior and senior years are not required to present a solo recital but may petition to present a junior and/or senior solo recital in that instrument. These students are required to follow the steps and protocol listed below.
MUA 201C/P – All students studying at this level of applied lessons during their junior and/or senior years may not present a formal solo recital.

Scheduling of Undergraduate Degree Solo Recitals

Students may schedule a solo recital by filling out a Solo Recital Petition form. The student will need to meet with the applied teacher to discuss and fill out this form. (This meeting should be done outside of the regular lesson time.) When the Petition is signed by the applied teacher the repertoire for the recital is set and the form should be taken to Sherry Orr who will provide the student a list of possible recital dates to choose from (already pre-set in the Department calendar and given on a first-come, first-served basis) and will set up a date for the qualifying exam. Please note: This petition must be received by Friday of the fourth week of classes each term. If the form is late, the student may have to wait until the following semester to present a solo recital.

Recording and Audio Support in Tiedtke Concert Hall

Faculty, music majors/minors, and Community School instructors are to complete and submit a Recording Request Form to Sherry Orr at least ten (10) days in advance of the scheduled event.  Sherry Orr, in consultation with the Department Chair, will schedule an approved technician to record and/or provide technical support for the event and will confirm with the requestor via email.

Only recording engineers/technicians authorized by the Department Chair are allowed access to, and use of departmental facilities and equipment for concert and other authorized recording sessions. 

Outside professional sound contractors hired to record an event using departmental facilities, equipment, microphone patch points, etc, must receive written approval from the Department Chair at least fifteen (15) class days prior to the scheduled concert.  A Recording Request Form must also be submitted to Sherry Orr ten (10) class days in advance of event, specifying what equipment is needed. Hired outside professional sound contractors bringing in their own equipment must receive written approval from the Department Chair at least fifteen (15) class days prior to the scheduled event.

The Music Department will not edit or otherwise alter recordings for the purposes of school applications, auditions, or competitions.

All Sound Recordings made by the Department of Music are the property of Rollins College.

Receptions

Receptions cannot take place in Keene Hall; students may arrange for receptions to be held in the Campus Center or at an off-campus location.

Solo Recital Protocol

Properly Set the Stage

Junior and senior solo recitals showcase a solo performance on the instrument a student has studied at the 301 or 401 applied lesson level while in the Department. They are not opportunities to display everything the student has studied.

The only instrument to be showcased by the student during the solo recital is the instrument the student has studied at the 301 or 401 level while a music major in the Department. Example: If the student plays the piano but has only studied voice at the 301 or 401 levels as a music major in the Department, the recital will showcase the student‘s voice accomplishments and the student may not play the piano in the recital.

The student is to present this recital in a professional manner. Neither the student, nor any instructor, nor the student‘s family will make any personal acknowledgments, gift exchanges, or personal anecdotes from the stage. These actions are to be reserved for a different venue.

Parents, friends, and relations should be encouraged not to take flash photographs during the program. Flash photography is startling to the performer and the audience.

Departmentally sponsored solo recitals are reflective of the Department. Therefore, these solo recitals belong to the Department, and must be approved by the Department. No video-recording will be permitted unless the Department has provided written permission. Please note: if the Department grants permission this video is only for the students’ personal use. No video is to be published (e.g. YouTube, etc.) or mass produced in any way, as the program belongs to the Department.

Length of Recitals

Junior solo recitals may be 20-25 minutes in total performing time.
Junior solo recitals will be presented in pairs with one student performing the first segment and one student performing the second segment, or with alternating sets.
Senior solo recitals may be 45–60 minutes in total performing time.
Part of the educational process includes learning how to schedule/time a recital. If the junior or senior solo recital is under or over the allowed time the student grade may be penalized.

Rehearsals

Once the recital date has been assigned, it is the responsibility of the student to see Sherry Orr to schedule rehearsal time in the concert hall. Juniors preparing a solo recital may schedule 2 hours in the concert hall, and seniors preparing a solo recital may schedule 4 hours of rehearsal in the concert hall.

Qualifying Exam for Solo Recital

The student will appear before a panel of three individuals composed of two of the tenure track faculty and the student‘s instructor or three of the tenure track faculty. The qualifying exam will follow the protocol outlined below and will be scheduled by Sherry Orr no earlier than one month prior to and no later than two weeks prior to the recital date.

The student must submit electronically the following files (using the performer's last name) in a single email to sorr@rollins.edu no later than one week prior to the exam date:
  - "EPROG - LastName" (A document that lists the recital program in order, with any intermissions or pauses noted)
  - "EBIO - LastName" (A document that contains a 150-word biography of the student performer, without acknowledgements or "thank you's")
  - "ETRANS - LastName" (A well-formatted document that contains Text and Translations for all vocal music)
  - "ENOTES - LastName" (An optional document that may include program notes to accompany the recital)

At the qualifying exam, the student will perform material from the proposed recital as requested by the examining panel and in the manner it will be presented in the recital. If it is determined by the panel the student is not ready to perform, the recital will be canceled. Notification of the results of the qualifying exam will be emailed to the student and the instructor by Sherry Orr no later than two days after the exam.

Final Recital Programs and Materials

No later than five days after notification of a successful qualifying exam, the recitaling student must submit electronically the following final (corrected) versions of each file (using the performer's last name) in a single email to sorr@rollins.edu:
  - "FPROG - LastName" (A document that lists the recital program in order, with any intermissions or pauses noted)
  - "FBIO - LastName" (A document that contains a 250-word biography of the student performer)
  - "FTRANS - LastName" (A well-formatted document that contains Text and Translations for all vocal music)
  - "FNOTES - LastName" (An optional document that may include program notes to accompany the recital)

Performers

This is a Solo Recital. All but a maximum of two musical pieces are to be with one primary accompanist (this accompanist may not be another student) and the solo student performer.

There may be one musical piece during the solo recital where there are up to but no more than three performers allowed. The performers for this one musical piece may be composed of the following:

  • the primary accompanist, another Department student and the solo student or
  • two Department students and the solo student

There may also be one musical piece where the primary accompanist is replaced for a Department student playing a different instrument.
Since the solo recital is the student‘s time to be featured, no instructors are to perform.

Repertoire

Selections should be derived from the repertoire the student has accumulated while studying in the Department with the applied teacher.
Student compositions are not appropriate in this venue.

Penalty

If the student does not follow these Department policies, the student will receive a failing grade for the solo recital, which, in turn, will result in a failing grade for applied lessons in that semester.

Composition Recitals

Composer Responsibilities

  • Only students registered for a composition course may submit a piece for a composition recital. Only one piece, seven minutes in duration or less, may be submitted per semester.
  • The course instructor must approve any piece that is to appear in recital.
  • Performers will participate only with the permission of their applied teacher.
  • Any piece to be performed by a department ensemble or established chamber group may only be performed with the permission of the instructor.
  • For all pieces involving ensembles or established chamber groups: All pieces must be finalized with each part and a full score printed, and given to the group at least three weeks before the performance. Please note: There cannot be exceptions.
  • All scores and parts for pieces to be performed in recital must be “publication ready” the first time they are distributed to performers. This means that they are fully edited and proofread with all tempo marks, articulations, and dynamics clearly indicated. It is extraordinarily unprofessional to submit anything less than this.
  • Any established groups will accept no more than three pieces per semester. (If their performance load is unduly taxing they may not even accept this many.) A piece equals one movement of approximately five minutes in duration.
  • Any extra work outside of any established group‘s regular rehearsal time will be considered as overtime work that is outside of normal department and student responsibilities. Only in case of emergency, will it be privately discussed between an established group and the composer.
  • Established groups cannot be expected to rehearse more than 30-45 minutes per week on any new composition.
  • Complete program information must be available two weeks prior to the recital.
  • Composers will attend all rehearsals of their work.

Performer‘s Responsibilities

  • When asked to participate in a composition recital, it is a performer‘s responsibility to look at the material and give a timely response to the composer as to his or her availability. Two or three days are a reasonable amount of time to decide about this. (Never agree to participate without some thoughtful study of the piece.)
  • Once you have agreed to participate, it is very bad form to back out, especially if the performance date is near. If you must back out, you should find a replacement and be sure that he or she has the music and the rehearsal schedule.
  • Everything you do in public reflects on your professionalism. Prepare the new piece with the same rigor and seriousness of purpose that you would prepare something from the standard repertoire.

Scholarship Policies

Named Scholarships

The majority of the funds from the Virginia S. and W.W. Nelson bequest have established the Nelson Music Scholarships.
These scholarships, and those listed below, are merit awards bestowed after an audition before a panel composed of a majority of the tenure track music faculty.

  • Alphonse and Katherine Carlo
  • Arthur Knowles Hutchins
  • Quantrell
  • John Carter
  • Mattie M. Kelly
  • Albert Pick, Jr.
  • Walter Chambury
  • Charles McCollough
  • John Reardon
  • Charles S. and Faith L. Duffy
  • McFeely-Rogers
  • Ross Rosazza
  • Eaton
  • William Muncey
  • Nancy Derian Shields
  • Gooch
  • W.W. and Virginia S. Nelson
  • L.C. Smith
  • Charlotte Gero
  • George G. Nichols, Jr
  • G.T. Willey
  • Robert Hufstader

Scholarship Application and Renewal

Scholarships are awarded by tenure track faculty consensus or committee.
Please note: Once awarded, scholarships are not renewed automatically.

Arts and Sciences - students must apply for scholarships annually by turning in a Scholarship Request form each spring for the coming year. These scholarship forms, deadlines, and announcements are made available each spring semester in the main class room hallway. It is the responsibility of the student to read the announcements and act accordingly.

Hamilton Holt - students must apply for scholarships each semester by turning in a Scholarship Request form during the current semester for the coming semester. These scholarship forms, deadlines, and announcements are made available during the second half of each semester in the main class room hallway. It is the responsibility of the student to read the announcements and act accordingly.

The quality of a student‘s efforts in ensembles, classes, and applied study weigh heavily in the scholarship decision process.
Students who have been awarded a scholarship in one applied music concentration may not change their primary instrument without the approval of the Department Chair, who will consult with the tenured members of the Department of Music faculty.

Facilities & Equipment Policies

Building Hours/Access

Keene Hall is open for use from Sunday–Saturday, 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight. The Chase Avenue (west) entrance is the main entrance and is locked at 10:00pm each evening. To enter the building between the hours of 10:00pm and midnight a personal Intellikey (i-key) will be required. For safety reasons, no one is to be in the building between the hours of 12:01am and 6:59am during which time the building is officially closed.

Food and Drink Policy

NO FOOD OR DRINK OTHER THAN BOTTLED WATER OR WATER IN CLOSED CONTAINERS IS ALLOWED IN KEENE HALL. This is strictly enforced.

Smoking

Federal law prohibits smoking within 25 feet of any exterior building entrance.  This is enforced at all Keene Hall entrances and exits and includes the seating area located at the west entrance.

Keys

All keys are issued through Sherry Orr. Each student may have 2 keys: an i-key and a standard key.

  • I-Key Access: Student Access – Chase Ave. (west/main) entrance, and room 105 (student lounge).
  • All other practice studios on the second floor have a conventional lock and each student is issued a standard key that will open all of these rehearsal rooms.

Do not lend your keys or open doors for anyone without Department approval. Doing so will result in the lost of key privileges.
If access is needed to any of the rooms listed below, please see Sherry Orr who will secure clearance through the proper Department faculty/Department Chair, and then provide a memo and instructions for you to update your i-key. Access needed for entire classes will be turned in by the instructor.

Located on the ground floor are the John M. Tiedtke Concert Hall, the Fred Rogers Lobby and Patio, classrooms (101 & 103), ensemble room (102), the office of Chuck Archard (102-A inside room 102), the keyboard/computer lab (104), the large rehearsal room (119), the student lounge/conference room (105), the faculty workroom (151), the green room (141), the music library (133), the office of the Executive Assistant, Susan Throm-White (153), the office of the Administrative Assistant, Sherry Orr (135), and the Office of the Director, Dr. Sinclair (135).

Located on the second floor are a small chamber rehearsal room (267), the recording studio‘s (248/211), all full-time faculty offices, practice rooms, lockers, and the adjunct office (223).

Please note: Campus Safety has been instructed not to open any classrooms or offices without prior authorization by the Department.

Student Lounge

The Zollo Room (rm. 105) is the student room for gathering, and is the only room in the building where students may have food/drink.  Please keep the student lounge neat and clean.  If you wish to reserve this room for a student meeting or event, please contact Sherry Orr.

Telephone

A phone is available on the wall in the west hall on the second floor for local calls. Dial 8 for off-campus.

Mailboxes

Student mailboxes are located on the second floor on the wall opposite the stairway exit. Check your box regularly. Leave any messages for full-time faculty and adjunct instructors in their mailboxes in the faculty workroom.

Studios/Practice Rooms

Practice rooms are located on the second floor. Some studios double as practice rooms when not in use for teaching. Please consult the schedule posted outside of each practice room/studio door as to its availability and note that access to the following rooms are only given to students who are currently enrolled in the following major areas:
  -Room 243 for piano majors only
  -Room 102 for percussion majors only

Ensemble students not registered for applied lessons but using an instrument or instruments that have an assigned location in the music building may have access to practice their ensemble instruments during available hours* from 9am-5pm Monday-Friday. These rooms will be closed to ensemble students on Saturdays and Sundays. (*Room availability is posted by the door each semester.)

Students are NOT allowed to use the practice rooms to teach, even during the summer months. Windows at the practice room doors must be kept uncovered at all times. Keep the rooms neat; nobody likes practicing in the midst of others’ clutter. Rooms 253–256 are kept unlocked. Never leave unattended belongings in these rooms! Please note: All other rooms and studios MUST be kept locked at all times.

Lockers and Instrument Storage

Lockers are located on the second floor and are available on a first-come/first-served basis. Only Department-issued locks may be used. For lockers or other large instrument storage, see Sherry Orr for availability.

Equipment

Report any equipment or instrument malfunctions to Susan Throm-White. Please report any stolen or damaged equipment or instruments to Susan Throm-White.

Please help keep Keene Hall and its property attractive and in good working order by returning chairs and stands to their proper location and leaving tables and equipment in their assigned rooms. Ask Sherry Orr or the Susan Throm-White for permission to post items and for the proper material to be used. Please note: Do not tape anything to the outside doors, stairwell doors, classroom doors, signs, or walls.

The Massey Keyboard/Computer Lab (104)

The lab contains 10 Macintosh iMacs with Korg full-sized keyboards. The Department owns Finale, Sibelius, Musica Practica, and Performer software. Please note: No water containers are allowed in this room.

This lab is for Music Department course work only. When an instructor is teaching a class in the lab, the lab is OFF LIMITS to any other student not in that class. Web surfing and email activity is strictly prohibited in the lab at all times. Please use other computers in Olin Library or the Campus Center for those activities.

Hours of access to the lab vary from semester to semester. Check the schedule outside the door.

The John M. Tiedtke Concert Hall

Given in memory of long-time benefactor John M. Tiedtke, the acoustically resonant concert hall is the heart of the Department. This is where nearly all concerts take place.

There are two pianos that reside in the concert hall, a Steinway “D” concert grand piano as well as a smaller Young Chang grand piano. The Steinway “D” concert grand is an extremely costly, finely tuned, and delicate instrument that demands handling with great care and respect. There will be times you may be asked to use the smaller Young Chang grand piano. Students are not allowed to practice on the Steinway “D” unless they are preparing for their recitals and have the direct permission of a full-time faculty of the Department. Students are not allowed to move the Steinway “D” on stage or in and out of Tiedtke Hall without the direct supervision of a full-time faculty or staff member. The Department would like to thank you in advance for you understanding in this area. If you have any questions concerning the usage of the pianos, please consult with Dr. Cook.

When attending concerts, male students should remove caps. Feet belong on the floor, do not place on the back of or over the top of the seats in front of you. Please note: Gum and water containers are not allowed in the Concert Hall.

The Reinhold Rehearsal Room (119)

Choral and orchestral rehearsals take place in this fully-equipped room. State-of-the art audio and video equipment and a Baldwin concert grand piano are permanently installed here. The plastic rehearsal chairs are never to leave this room. The only exception would be when they are in a storage area on storage racks.

Copy Machine

The copy machine in the work room (151) is for Departmental use only. There are photocopying machines for student use located in Olin Library. Please note: Students who are taking applied music lessons must purchase their own music. The copying of printed scores is illegal under Federal and International Copyright Law, and the Department supports this law.

Knowles Memorial Chapel

The Department is responsible for providing music for the interdenominational worship service in Knowles Chapel on Sunday mornings. The Department welcomes the opportunity to share its resources and talents in this beautiful space. All the Department‘s ensembles (both vocal and instrumental) and soloists will take their turns contributing to the Sunday morning services.

The Christmas Vespers services are the highlight of every holiday season. Presented by the Department‘s choral and instrumental ensembles as a gift to the community, these services are a tradition which dates back to 1933.

Work Study Students

Work-study students are an integral part of the smooth operation of the Department, which makes all work study assignments. All work-study students report to Sherry Orr.

Student Societies

Sigma Alpha Iota

Sigma Alpha Iota International Music Fraternity, is a Greek music fraternity for women. It is an organization whose purposes are to foster interests in music and to promote social contact among persons sharing an interest in music. It is a specialized Fraternity which confines its membership to persons interested in the single academic discipline — music — in accredited colleges and universities. It may initiate members of the general (social) college fraternities. Election for a new President will take place during the semester under the supervision of Dr. Susan Lackman, faculty advisor.

Pi Kappa Lambda

Pi kappa Lambda is the honorary music society. Both men and women are admitted to membership. Members are elected from the top 20% of the graduating class, from faculty members, or from alumni with high scholastic standing.

The Student Advisory Council

The Student Advisory Council is a group of students who advise the faculty on issues that arise from time to time regarding curriculum or departmental life.

Forms

All department of music forms are available online in the Forms section of the website, but may also be found in the file holders located by rm. 135. Forms may be filled out on the computer using Adobe Acrobat Reader and then printed for the appropriate signature(s). Please note: It is the responsibility of each student to submit forms on time and with the appropriate signature(s).