Sorority Myths Debunked

MYTH 1: Sororities only give bids to women who act and look like the sorority stereotype. Actually, the classic “Sorority Girl” stereotype of a Barbie-esque snob is the LAST person sorority organizations are looking to recruit. Our sororities consist of academic scholars, campus leaders (in FSL and other organizations all over campus), philanthropists, and women who keep open minds. Sorority women call themselves sisters, meaning a special bond of friendship between the members, and the organizations are looking for new members who will support their relationships and make the group stronger—not stereotypes that would disrupt those.

MYTH 2: If you’re in a sorority, you can’t be involved in anything else. At Rollins, sorority women from every chapter can be found across the campus—not just as members of other groups and activities, but as leaders within them! Women who belong to sororities are a diverse group with equally diverse interests. From theatre to politics, SGA to athletics, sorority women at Rollins practice some simple time management to enjoy every aspect of campus life. Rollins chapters are no strangers to sharing the talents of their members with the broader community and support their sisters with programs and internal structures designed to encourage other commitments.

MYTH 3: Sororities haze new members. Not only is hazing a federal offense banned by all campuses and sorority national headquarters, it also just doesn’t make sense when you’re trying to build relationships. Sorority women know that their sisterhoods are built on trust and friendship, not on intimidation or cruelty.

MYTH 4: Sorority women care more about binge drinking than GPAs. If this were true, there probably wouldn’t be any members of the FSL community on campus. Binge drinking, itself, is discouraged under the judicial and standards boards of the individual chapters on campus, and all of the sororities at Rollins have minimum GPA requirements to join, as well as programs designed to foster and encourage academic success within the chapters. Rollins fraternities and sororities, like those at most colleges and universities in the nation, boast higher average GPAs than the average undergrad GPA, as well as higher graduation rates.

MYTH 5: Sorority women are “buying” their friends. While it is true that sororities require dues each semester, that fee is not a price tag for your friends. Just like any social or athletic organization, or personal hobby/activity, it takes money to run a sorority. Dues pay for things like socials, event transportation, philanthropy support, house maintenance, and even t-shirts and gear. Taking on a new sport would require similar expenses for lessons, a uniform, gear, travel plans for games, and membership to athletic facilities. In addition, many sororities offer payment plans and financial options, as well as open the doors to scholarships available to members.

MYTH 6: During Recruitment, sororities only take freshmen girls. Although the majority of women enrolled in Formal Recruitment are first-year students, many upperclassmen also partake in the process and join an organization on Bid Day. Sorority women are students, too, and they understand that making the commitment to join a chapter has to come at the right time—which may after a year or two of already being on campus.