Economics
Spring 2018

ECO 202 Introduction to Economics in Historical Perspective
Any analysis of contemporary societies requires some degree of familiarity with the history, concepts, tools, assumptions, policies, and philosophical positions that together describe the economy and it's evolution over time. In the words of one of my favorite economists: "The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists." (Joan Robinson, 1955) Suitable for non-majors.

ECO 242 Economics, Media, Propaganda
Examines how economic rhetoric in the media is shaping popular understanding of political-economic issues and public policy. Consider the following quote: "The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists."

ECO 303 Intermediate Microeconomics
Continues with mainstream theories of consumer and firm behavior, using mathematical as well as graphical techniques. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 202 and 203.

ECO 305H Topic: Alternative  Economic Ideologies

ECO 339 Women and Work
This course is offered through the Department of Economics at Rollins College. The course provides an overview of the economics of gender, with particular focus on labor theory and their connection to the household. It considers gender a relevant socially constructed category in modern economies and studies how gender affects economic decisions and outcomes. Prerequisite: ECO 202 and 203.

ECO 350 Mindful Economics:  Economic Decision-Making and the Brain
This course examines economic decision-making from both a behavioral economic perspective and a neuroeconomic perspective, contrasting it with the approach used in standard economics. Prerequisite: ECO 202 and 203.

ECO 355 Environmental Economics
The course will examine the economics and scientific basis of environmental issues and the policies that are used in addressing them. The advantages and disadvantages of different regulatory responses will be discussed. We will also discuss methods for valuing the benefits of environmental amenities that do not have an observable value in the marketplace, including the approach used more recently in “ecological economics”. The use of economics in regulating a natural resource (commercial marine fisheries) will be evaluated. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 202 and 203.