Summer 2015

Start: May 18
End: August 10

Holidays:
Memorial Day: May 25
Independence Day: July 4

Jump to Fall Schedule

schedule of classes

Summer 2015 Schedule of Classes

course descriptions

Course descriptions reflect the Summer term schedule only.

Last update: April 8, 2015

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ANTHROPOLOGY
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ANT 206 Anthropological Perspectives on Love and Marriage

Investigates patterns of courtship and marriage from a cross-cultural perspective. Explores the biological/evolutionary basis of male-female relationships. Includes two texts on love and marriage in non-Western cultures and one non-Western example of fiction pertinent to courtship and marriage.

ANT 305Q Topic: Business Anthropology

In today’s marketplaces, leading organizations regularly rely on the tools and practices of anthropology. In this course, students will learn about organizational anthropology and how the discipline is being employed by organizations to optimize outcomes in areas such as productivity, messaging & branding, operations, and mission impact. Students will gain valuable insights into organizational cultures as well as applied methods of organizational assessment and transformation used by anthropologists to empower organizations in ever more globalized markets.

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BIOLOGY
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BIO 106 Human Impacts on Marine Ecosystems

An introduction to marine ecosystems and the impacts of human activities on marine flora and fauna. Addresses contemporary issues of exploitation, pollution and conservation, and their ecological consequences.

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BUSINESS
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BUS 135 Business Law & Ethics

This course introduces students to the legal and ethical environment of business.  It will assist students in identifying and analyzing ethical issues in business while giving students practical decision-making skills.  Basic legal content such as contracts, torts, alternative dispute resolution, intellectual property, and employment law will be covered.

BUS 215 Micro & Macro Economics

This course introduces economic theory and analysis as they apply to personal, entrepreneurial, and policy-related decision-making. We will discuss economic concepts used to describe, explain, evaluate, predict, and address key social, political, & economic problems in many countries, highlighting the social impact of economic choices.

BUS 230 Financial & Managerial Accounting

This course introduces theories and methods of using accounting systems and information technology to solve problems and evaluate performance throughout the business lifecycle.  The course explores the role of accounting in providing timely and accurate information for external reporting and to support managerial planning, control, and decision-making. Prerequisite: BUS 101 or HCM 200.

BUS 310 Management & Organizational Behavior

Management is the process of understanding and motivating people to perform work to achieve objectives.  Students focus on developing key competencies including responsible decision making, effective communication, leadership, broad & global perspectives, understanding human motivation, setting objectives, and analytical problem solving.  Using case studies, we will explore applications such as performance, project, crisis, and conflict management. Prerequisite: Junior status and BUS 101 or BUS 130 and 132.

BUS 312 Responsible Business Leadership

Focuses on understanding the mindsets of responsible leaders (commitments, vision, values, ethics, and philosophy); developing leadership skills, styles, strengths, and relationships; and using leadership to promote social responsibility, resolve conflicts, and overcome obstacles. Prerequisite: BUS and Junior status.

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COMMUNICATION
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COM 100 Intro Communication Studies

This course provides an overview of the history, practices, and key areas of research that inform the discipline of communication studies.  Students will be introduced to the applied concentrations within the major and will develop an understanding of various research methods and theories relevant to the discipline.

COM 220 Interpersonal Communication

This course explores communication strategies to interact more effectively in everyday, one-on-one relationships with family, friends, and co-workers.

COM 305 Listening

The study of the art of listening and its importance in our personal and professional lives. Students learn to analyze, assess, and improve their own listening abilities.

COM 306 Intercultural Communication

Examines concepts/constructs, theories, and empirical research pertinent to communication within and between cultures, with primary foci on contexts and relationships.

COM 324 Self-Leadership and Communication

This course explores the many ways that self-leadership skills may be enhanced through effective communication principles, strategies and techniques. Topics to be discussed include rebuilding personal infrastructures, establishing high standards and wide boundaries, eliminating tolerations in life, competing with the past, developing reserves, making the present perfect, becoming a problem-free zone, and much more. Offered on a credit/no credit basis only.

COM 480 Senior Seminar in Communication

This capstone course, taken in the senior year by students majoring in Organizational Communication or Communication Studies, provides an end-of-the-program opportunity for the advanced study of communication in multiple everyday contexts. Prerequisite: Senior status and major in Communication Studies.

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DANCE
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DAN 177 Jazz I

Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Works in studio on body placement and alignment through highly-structured classical jazz warm-up (LUIGI). Values clarity and quality of movement, rhythm, style, and use of dynamics.

DAN 277 Jazz II

Concentrates studio work on more complicated combinations, changes of direction, and initiation of pirouettes. Includes historical research, critical studies, and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: DAN 177 or consent.

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ECONOMICS
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ECO 202 Economics in Historical Perspective

Any analysis of contemporary societies requires some degree of familiarity with the history, concepts, tools, assumptions, policies, and philosophical positions that together describe the economy and it's evolution over time. In the words of one of my favorite economists: "The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists." (Joan Robinson, 1955) Suitable for non-majors. 

ECO 205C Topic: The European Economy since 1945

This course provides historical background to the Soviet, Central East European and Western European economies between 1945-1990 and covers the Central-East European economies’ transition, from 1989 through 2007, and their current economic development following accession into the European Union. In doing so the course presents an economic framework for understanding the continent’s history that is considered critical to its economic performance and analyzes the recent change. The analysis targets three broad eras: the communist era after WW II, transition stages in the 1990s, and expansion into the European Union over the past decade.  More specifically, we incorporate historical background to the Soviet and East European economies between 1950-1990; institutional features of Soviet type economies (balanced planning, pricing, success indicators, etc); patterns of economic performance under communism; conceptual approaches to transformation and elements in the process of transformation; development of capital markets; foreign investment; EU enlargement; case studies of national strategies and outcomes; the impact of the 2008 world economic crisis on the European economy in general and the various measures deployed by governments to contain it.

ECO 254 Latin American Economies

Stresses post-WWII economic issues of growth, inflation, unemployment, income and wealth distribution, and economic development, as well as connection between economic events and politics. Suitable for nonmajors.

ECO 277 Economics and Cinema

This course focuses on how movies employ cinematographic artistry to address political-economic issues. It is designed for students with a genuine interest in cinema and in social issues. We will view a diverse selection of movies, discuss the economic issues they address, and analyze the artistic devices they use to convey them. As a final project, students will create and present a proposal for a movie including a synopsis of the story, its economic context, and an analysis of the ways it would express social-economic issues. Actual short pilot movies are very highly encouraged. Suitable for non-majors.

ECO 371 International Economic History

Traces the evolution of economic institutions from antiquity to the present. Applies diverse approaches to understand historical processes and structures, concentrating on those relevant to current debates. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 212 and 213.

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EDUCATION
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EDU 280 Diversity in American Education

Examines cultural pluralism in the classroom: multicultural education, diversity and teaching, bilingual education, racism, tracking, and teacher preparation. ESOL stand alone course.

EDU 346F Educ Immigrants US/Netherlands

EDU 346F Teaching Practicum in China

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ENGLISH
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ENG 140 Composition: Writing About Selected Topics

Develops students' ability to write college-level essays by practicing strategies of argumentation and by refining skills of invention, revision, and critical thinking. Leads to writing essays characterized by unity, order, coherence, completeness, clarity, and mechanical correctness. In order to satisfy the College's general education requirement for writing (W), students must receive a grade of C or better in the course. Section topics are designated by individual instructors. This course (or an equivalent) must be taken during the first semester at Rollins. Formerly ENG 101. Does not count as elective credit in the English Major or Minor or the Writing Minor.

ENG 206 Grammar Bootcamp

Covers basic English grammar as well as more advanced grammar to prepare students for advanced writing courses. Topics include parts of speech, sentence structure, punctuation, diction, and cohesion. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 259A Topic: American Icon: Clint Eastwood

The films of Clint Eastwood from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to American Sniper. This weekend course will explore Clint Eastwood’s development as both an actor and a director by examining films from different stages of his career. In addition to viewing and discussing his films, students will read reviews, interviews and essays about him and his films, read three books on which the films are based, and write reviews. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 267 Topics/Techniques in Writing

The topics version of this course offers an introduction to a very specific genre of writing (fiction, autobiography, humor writing, etc.), giving close attention to the defining characteristics of the genre and offering a sequence of short reading and writing assignments designed to develop facility in producing the genre. The techniques version of this course offers a close study of a specific literary technique (point of view, character/dialogue, narrative design, voice), and requires practicing the technique in short, focused writing assignments with emphasis on both literary and technical excellence. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or consent.

ENG 300B Expository Writing: Informal Essay

This course offers students writing practice in the informal essay, a form of writing characterized by self-reflection, individual tastes and experiences, open form, and conversational manner. Early practitioners include E.B. White, Joan Didion, and John McPhee. Students will study the primary qualities demonstrated by these and other masters of the informal essay: narrative techniques, flexible structure and design, unity and order, rhetorical intent, and tone. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 300E Expository Writing: Documented Investigation

This course examines a variety of investigative genres: proposals, interviews, arguments, persuasive letters, as well as source-based reports and essays. As a final project in the course, students may investigate a problem facing one of their communities -- family, work, neighborhood, church, city -- and write a well-researched paper that explains relevant issues and argues for a solution. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 304B American Literature: American Exodus

Examines fiction in American literature, emphasizing the changing forms and conventions of the genre. Focus varies, sometimes by broad literary movement (American Renaissance, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Postmodernism), sometimes by theme (race, gender, experimentation, the West). Prerequisite: ENG 140 and one 200-level ENG elective.

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
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ENV 215 Graphic Design: Town and Landscapes

Graphic communication is an invaluable tool for participation in community design.  Our focus is developing skills in freehand architectural graphics: elevations, site plans, site sections, paraline drawings and direct perspectives.  Our creative tools will include: pencil, colored pencils, pens, markers and watercolor.  To enhance these traditional graphics, students will be introduced to graphic digital programs: Revit, SketchUp, Photoshop, Illustrator and Indesign.  We will create hybrid sketches - combining traditional and digital sketches.  Coursework will include graphic analysis of well-designed communities by creating conceptual diagrams, site analysis graphics, section/elevations, axonometric drawings and sequential perspective views.  

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HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
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HCM 200 The Healthcare System

This course provides students with an understanding of the current American health care system including its history and evolution. The structure of the health care system, financing of health care, provider components, and the legal and regulatory framework within which our system operates will be addressed. The American system will be compared to health care systems globally and national issues such as public health, consumerism, access to and quality of care, health care reform, pay for performance, and managed care organizations will be discussed.

HCM 315 Healthcare Management and Governance

Healthcare Governance and Organizational Structure deals with the development and analysis of the organizational structure and with delineating responsibility, authority, and accountability at all levels of the organization. Functions include the development and implementation of policies and procedures for the governance process.  General management deals with processes such as planning, organizing, directing, and controlling in addressing overall organizational objectives. Prerequisite: HCM 200 has been waived for the summer 2015 term only.

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HISTORY 
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HIS 205E Topic: Public History: Cremating the Confederate Flag

This course uses digital artifacts created by students to explore public memory after the Civil War. Using primary sources, students will explore, assess, and present historical narratives that shed light on the New South experience in Florida. 

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HUMANITIES
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HUM 315B: Topic: The Power of Water in Art and Life

Nothing is softer or more flexible than water, yet nothing can resist it -- Lao Tzu

Through literature, art, music, religion and sacred places, this course will carry us along powerful currents of ocean waves, into the depths of rivers, and across the swaying grasslands of Florida’s natural beauty. Through a variety of genres, we will encounter “the power of water -- the voice of life, the voice of Being, [and] the voice of perpetual Becoming.” -- Herman Hesse, Siddhartha 

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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
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INAF 315D Topic: Terror State of Iraq and Syria

This course covers the rise of the terror state on the Iraq-Syria border. This tentative state, known variously as The Islamic State, ISIS or ISIL, has emerged as a consequence of the disintegrating powers of the governments in Damascus and Baghdad. We will explore the implications of this state for the people of the Middle East as well as for the United States and the global community.

INAF 315G Topic: Writing on International Affairs

This course provides hands-on experience with short writing assignments that are based on the actual requirements of the global work world, both public and private. It draws from the investigation and analysis of current, real-life international scenarios that create contexts for clear, succinct and accurate written material such as briefs and issue summaries, as well as policy statements and commentaries that include a persuasive dimension.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
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INT 100 Learning Strategies Seminar

The Learning Strategies Seminar is a one-semester credit course designed to assist students with becoming responsible learners through self-management and use of academic support services. The course will address strategies for academic planning and time management, motivation, learning styles, study skills, managing stress, and other life adjustment skills. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval.

INT 115A Topic: Art for Rollins: Learning Frameworks for Life 

This course will introduce students to the advantages of engagement with art at Rollins by investigating the role of art on the Rollins campus, historically and today.

INT 215B Topic: Learning in the Connected Age

This course explores how social connectivity, mobility, and media change how we think of knowledge, how it is created, and how we design for it. Specifically, connectivism will be used as an overall framework to provide best practices when designing instruction and learning experiences in various modalities for education and the enterprise. Topics include informal learning, connectivism theory, communities of practice, mobile learning, and technology for knowledge networks. The potential novel learning affordances, as well as challenges of designing and promoting learning within connected, more informal contexts, will be a critical focus of the course. Practical instructional design and technology strategies for implementing social, connected learning will also be addressed.

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LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN STUDIES
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LAC 200 Foundations of Latin American and Caribbean Culture & Society

Surveys Latin American and Caribbean history, anthropology, and literature. Addresses the region's prehistory, colonialism, slavery, kinship, music, dance, race and identity, tourism, transnational encounters, and globalization.

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MATHEMATICS
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MAT 103 Quantitative Reasoning

Covers collection of data and analysis of everyday quantitative information using spreadsheets or statistical packages. Touches upon population vs. sample, parameter versus statistic, variable type, graphs, measures of center and variation, regression analysis, and hypothesis testing.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION
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PED 101 Health & Wellness

Emphasizes self-awareness and responsibility in maintaining health. Deals with consumerism, emotional health, intimate relationships, stress management, nutrition, fitness, disease prevention, and individualized behavior modification.

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PHILOSOPHY
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PHI 301 Dostoevsky and the "God Problem"

Students will be introduced to the tortured life and seminal thought of the Russian novelist, Fyodor Dostoevsky. Starting with the dark side of human nature they will study existential humanism from Sigmund Freud to Carl Rogers. They will explore the ‘God-problem’ and the meaning and purpose of personal life.

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PSYCHOLOGY
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PSY 211 Social Psychology

Presents a broad account of how the actual or imagined presence of others influences thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Touches upon conformity, attraction, prejudice, aggression, group decisions, and attitude change, as well as advertising, law, and indoctrination. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 261 Learning & Behavior Change

Introduces fundamentals of behavior acquisition and modification: reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, extinction, and sequential organization. Emphasizes total competence learning, requiring students to advance beyond recognition and recall. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 303 Lifespan Development

An introduction to the study of human growth and change over the lifespan. Topics include prenatal development, cognitive development, attachment, personality, social development, and gerontology. These topics form a basis for a discussion of the major theories of human development including cognitive development, social learning, and psychoanalytic models. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making

This course introduces descriptive and inferential statistical procedures for the social sciences. Topics covered include scales of measurement, probability, measures of central tendency and variability, null hypothesis testing using single or multiple samples, correlation, and regression, and both inferential and procedural errors individuals can make when calculating and interpreting statistics. Course must be completed as student declares psychology as a major. Individuals with insufficient mathematical preparation are encouraged to complete remedial work prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and high school algebra or equivalent.

PSY 326 Physiological Psychology

Introduces the fundamentals of nervous system responses to psychological processes. Explores the anatomy and physiology associated with psychological events, historical and contemporary issues in the field, and the societal and personal implications regarding the use of such measures. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

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DEVELOPING READING PROFICIENCY
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RED 309 Fundamentals of Reading

Examines the foundations of reading instruction from historical, linguistic, social, psychological, cognitive, and curricular perspectives. Theoretical base for reading and language arts methodology courses. Explores basic phonics instruction, reading programs in use, nature of reading and writing processes, and balanced approach to reading instruction. Passing scores on GK.

RED 369 Research-Based Practices in Literacy Instruction

Teacher candidates will scaffold student learning by applying comprehensive instructional practices integrating the six components of reading. Teacher candidates will review recent research with an emphasis on techniques used to implement literature and writing experiences across the elementary school curriculum.

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RUSSIAN STUDIES
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RSN 222 History of Russian Painting

A survey of the greatest accomplishments of Russian painting.Survey covers 700 years of medieval painting: icons, frescoes, and mosaics of Kiev, Novgorod, and Moscow; neoclassical and romantic painting; realist painting with the emphasis on the art of the Itinerants or Wanderers; the World of Art; the art of the Russian avant-garde, and the contemporary developments in Russian painting. Each period is discussed on the broad background of artistic developments in other countries to demonstrate the influences and borrowings as well as original contributions of the Russians to the artistic achievements of the world.

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SPANISH
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SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I

Grammar, readings, cultural material, intensive oral practice, optional language laboratory. Not for native speakers or advanced students.

SPN 102 Elementary Spanish II

Grammar, readings, cultural material, intensive oral practice, optional language laboratory. Prerequisite: SPN 101 or equivalent.

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THEATRE
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THE 203 History of American Film

Chronicles the development of movies and the political and socioeconomic impact of the film industry from the early twentieth century to the present. Requires evening movie viewing.  

THE 204 Villains of the Silver Screen

In-depth study of villainy in the cinema analyzing motivation, process and consequences, expected and unexpected. Examines the history of villainy in the film industry. Evil doers of both sexes will be discussed and compared, along with the psychological motivation that detoured them from the “John Wayne” path of life. Explores the sociological and pathological factors that create evil. 

registration dates

Students who entered Spring 2015 and have not yet met with an adviser are required to do so prior to registration. All other students are encouraged, but not required to meet with their adviser each term. You may make a telephone or office appointment by calling the Holt School Office at 407-646-2232.
Mandatory Pre-registration Check-In Opens March 17, 12:00 p.m. Check-in instructions provided in FoxLink.
Online registration begins at noon on the published first date of each registration period and ends at midnight on the last published date.  Staff support is available noon until 6:30 p.m. on the first day and 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. for the remainder of the registration period.
March 24 - May 18 Senior Registration: Although senior status technically begins at 100 earned hours, degree-seeking Holt students with a declared major and 90+ earned hours at the time of registration are permitted to participate in senior registration.
March 27 - May 18 Registration for Current Degree-seeking Students: Priority registration for degree-seeking students with a declared major and fewer than 90 earned semester hours at the time of registration. Registered seniors may add/drop during this period.
March 31 - May 18

Registration for Undeclared Majors: Degree-seeking students (all levels) with no declared major at the time of registration.

A&S/CPS Day students may register starting at Noon.

April 6 - May 18 Registration for authorized new, returning, and nondegree-seeking students: Complete applications are required for new and returning students and include the application form/fee, official transcripts from all previously attended institutions, and all documentation required for international students. New students will receive a letter with authorization to contact the Holt School Office for a registration appointment. Students completing applications after the new student registration will be contacted by a program adviser and permitted to register during the late registration period.
April 15 - 20 Administrative review and enrollment census. Low enrolled courses may be canceled at this time. No registrations accepted during the review period.
May 18, 2015 Payment Deadline: Full tuition payment must be received by the Holt School or Bursar's Office prior to 5:00 p.m. A low-cost payment plan is available. Please refer to payment instructions.
May 16 New Student Orientation
4:00 to 8:00 pm
Location: TBD

payment deadline

Payment Due:

May 18, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Tuition:

$432 per credit hour

  • $864 - 2 credit hour course
  • $1,728 - 4 credit hour course
  • $2,592 - 6 credit hour course

late fee policy

Beginning fall 2015, in addition to a Bursar's hold, accounts with a past due balance will be subject to a monthly late payment fee on the following scale:

Past Due Balance of $200 - $999.99 $75
Past Due Balance of $1,000 - $4,999.99 $125
Past Due Balance of $5,000 - $19,999.99 $200
Past Due Balance of $20,000 or greater 1% of Past Due Amount

Please visit the Bursar's website for additional information. 

 

Note: By registering, students agree to accept full responsibility for the payment of tuition and fees. If a payment is not fulfilled or returned for insufficient funds or no approval by credit, students also agree to pay all fees associated with collection of due funds, including collection costs and attorney's fees.

guide to majors and minors

The following information is to be used as a guide in selecting courses that will satisfy major or minor requirements. The requirements reflected are 2013-14 catalog requirements. Students should consult their academic advisor if they have questions. Complete details regarding course offerings can be found in the section "Schedule of Courses." Course descriptions are published in the Holt School Catalog and in this online bulletin.

Sections with a G suffix (e.g. H1G) are cross-listed with Graduate Program in Education and permission is required for enrollment.

Summer Parts of Term:

(12) Twelve-Week Term: May 18 - August 10

(1) First Six-Week Term: May 18 - June 29

(2) Second Six-Week Term: June 30 - August 10


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AFRICAN & AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES
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Electives:
EDU 280 Diversity in American Education
HIS 141 African-American History II

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BUSINESS
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Core Courses:
BUS 135 Busines Law & Ethics
BUS 215 Micro & Macro Economics
BUS 230 Financial/Managerial Acctg
BUS 310 Management & Org Behavior

Elective Courses:
BUS 312 Responsible Business Leadership
COM 220 Interpersonal Communication
COM 305 Listening
COM 306 Intercultural Communication

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COMMUNICATION STUDIES
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Core Courses:
COM 100 Intro Communication Studies
COM 220 Interpersonal Communication 
COM 305 Listening
COM 306 Intercultural Communication
COM 324 Self-Leadership & Communication
COM 480 SR Seminar in Communication

Public Relations Concentration Courses:
COM 324 Self-Leadership & Comunication

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DANCE (Minor)
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Elective Courses:
DAN 177/277 Jazz I & II 

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ECONOMICS
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The Economics Major is a limited access major.  Admission to the Hamilton Holt School does not guarantee admission to the Economics Major. Admission criteria for the Economics Major is provided in the Holt School Undergraduate Catalog.  Please see your academic advisor for additional information.

Elective Courses:
ECO 202 Econ in Historical Perspective
ECO 205C Topic: Eurpn Econ Since 1945
ECO 254 Latin American Economies
ECO 277 Economics and Cinema
ECO 371 International Economic History 

Note: The department recommends the following courses for students preparing for graduate programs in economics:

ECO 381 Introduction to Econometrics
ECO 403 Applied Microeconomics
ECO 411 Introduction to Mathematical Economics
MAT 111 Calculus I
MAT 112 Calculus II
MAT 211 Calculus I
MAT 140 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
MAT 219 Probability and Statistics
MAT 140 Linear Algebra

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EDUCATION
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The Hamilton Holt School and the Department of Education offer two options for students who wish to enter the teaching profession. Graduates of these state-approved Teacher Education Programs are eligible for a Florida State Teacher Certification. The Department of Education offers certification in selected secondary (6-12) subjects (Music, Social Science, and English) and Elementary Education. Please refer to the Hamilton Holt School Catalog for requirements for both programs.

Professional Education Core Courses:
EDU 280 Diversity in American Education 

Methods Courses:
RED 309 Foundation of Reading 
RED 369 Research-Based Practice in Lit Instr

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ENGLISH
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Core Courses:
ENG 304B Am Lit: American Exodus

Elective Course:
ENG 259A Am Icon: Clint Eastwood
ENG 267 Writ Truth-Fiction or Memoir?

* Six electives - two at any level, three at the 300 level or higher, and one at the 400 level or higher.

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SUSTAINABLE URBANISM
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Electives:
ENV 215 Graphic Design:Town & Landscapes

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HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
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Core Courses:
BUS 230 Financial/Managerial Accounting
BUS 310 Management & Organizational Behavior
HCM 200 The Healthcare System
HCM 315 Healthcare Management & Governance

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HUMANITIES
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Expressive Arts:
DAN 177/277 Jazz I & II
HUM 315B Tpc:Power Water in Art & Life

History:
RSN 222 History of Russian Painting

Philosophy and Religious Studies:
PHI 301 Dostoevsky & the God Problem

Note: Individual courses may be used to satisfy one, not multiple, requirements.

Humanities Portfolio Checklist
Humanities majors/minors are required to keep a portfolio of critical essays, research papers, essay examinations, and other material from different courses that reflect each year a student has been a major.

Also, a final research project is required in connection with the last required core (HUM) course in which he/she enrolls. The student must notify the core-course instructor at the first class meeting of the student's intention to complete this requirement.

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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
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Business and Economics:
ANT 305Q Topic:Understand Org Culture
ECO 205C Topic: Eurpn Econ Since 1945
ECO 254 Latin American Economies 

Foreign Cultures and Language:
ANT 206 Anthro of Love & Marriage
LAC 200 Latin Amer and Carib Society
RSN 222 History of Russian Painting
SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I 
SPN 102 Elementary Spanish II

History and Politics:
INAF 315D Tpc: Terror State Iraq & Syria
INAF 315G Tpc: Writing Intern'l Affairs

Note: A minimum of 15 courses must be taken, of which at least eight must be at the 300 level or above. All IA majors who are not bilingual or polylingual must take at least one (1) language-learning class at the 200 level or above (e.g., SPN 201 or JPN 201). The language-learning course can count toward the cultures and languages area requirement. One of the upper-division courses must be an approved seminar. A copy of the seminar paper is to be submitted to the IA Director before graduation. This paper is used for evaluation of the IA Program. 

Note: Individual courses may be used to satisfy one, not multiple, requirements.

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LEADERSHIP DISTINCTION PROGRAM (CERTIFICATION)
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The Leadership Distinction Program is designed for students who want to excel beyond their degree requirements to develop their leadership potential. This program gives students extra opportunities to explore leadership development as they complete their undergraduate degrees at the Rollins College Hamilton Holt School. Students who successfully complete the leadership program and their degree requirements earn recognition of their achievements through the “Distinction in Leadership” transcript designation. 

Leadership Across the Curriculum:
COM 305 Listening  
COM 324 Self-Leadership & Communication 

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ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
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Core Courses:
PSY 211 Social Psychology 
PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making 

Interdisciplinary & Application Options:

COM 305 Listening 

*Note: Courses used to satisfy core requirements may not also be applied toward the Interdisciplinary/Applications requirement.

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PSYCHOLOGY
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Core Courses:
PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making 

Major Options:
PSY 211 Social Psychology 
PSY 261 Learning & Behavior Change
PSY 303 Lifespan Development

Major Electives:
PSY 326 Physiological Psychology

*Courses not used as Major Options can be used as Major Electives.

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WRITING (Minor)
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Electives:
ENG 267 Writ Truth-Fiction or Memoir?

 

general education requirements

As preparation for active and responsible citizenship in a global society, students need both breadth and depth in their learning experience. By majoring in at least one area of knowledge, students gain the depth necessary for professional and graduate expertise, whereas the general education curriculum at Rollins College exposes students to a more varied domain of knowledge and experience.

In keeping with the College’s mission to educate students to think critically across disciplines, the general education curriculum exposes students to the ways various areas of knowledge may reinforce and enrich each other.

To be eligible for a Bachelor of Arts degree, students must complete one course from each of the general education areas listed below. Please see the catalog for a full explanation of the area requirements.

Note: The list below reflects Summer 2015 course offerings that have been approved to meet specified GERs.

(12) = Twelve-Week Term, (1) = First Six-Week Term, (2) = Second Six-Week Term 

Expressive Arts (A)

  • DAN 177/277 (12)
  • ENG 259A Am Icon: Clint Eastwood (1)
  • RSN 222 History of Russian Painting (1)

Knowledge of Other Cultures (C)

  • ANT 206 Anthropology of Love and Marriage (1)
  • LAC 200 Latin American and Caribbean Society (1)

Knowledge of Western Cultures (H)

  • BUS 215 Micro and Macro Economics (2)
  • ECO 202 Economics in Historical Perspective (1)
  • HIS 205E Public History (2)
  • THE 203 History of American Film (2)

Awareness of Literature (L)

  • ENG 259A Am Icon: Clint Eastwood (1)
  • ENG 304B American Lit: American Exodus (1)

Quantitative Thinking (Q)

  • MAT 103 Quantative Reasoning
  • PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making (12)

Writing Reinforcement (R)

  • ENG 300 Expository Writing: All Topics (12)
  • RSN 222 History of Russian Painting (1)

Oral Communication (T)

  • PSY 211 Social Psychology (2)

Written Communication (W)

  • ENG 140 Writing About Special Topics (2)