Fall 2015

Start: August 24
End: December 10

Counseling Only:
Start: August 31
End: December 11

Holidays:
Labor Day: September 7
Thanksgiving Break: Nov 25-27

Jump to Summer Schedule

Fall Important Dates

Class Schedule Home

schedule of classes

Fall 2015 Undergraduate Schedule of Classes

course descriptions

Course descriptions reflect the Fall term schedule only.

Last update: March 23, 2015

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ANTHROPOLOGY
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ASL 200 American Sign Language II

In this course, the deaf culture and principles related to an intermediate level of conceptual sign language will be emphasized. Complex grammatical structure and construction will be introduced. Students will develop advanced receptive and expressive conversational skills. Prerequisite: ASL 100.

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ANTHROPOLOGY
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ANT 205G Topic: Anthropology of Food

This course covers food as a key aspect of culture in light of the rituals surrounding its consumption, the changing family aspects of meals, the identification of specific cuisines, and food's function in bonding, as well as in other symbolic processes in various cultures.

ANT 205N Topic: Happiness and Culture

This course draws on cultural and cognitive anthropology to guide students in exploring the culturally situated nature of how we define happiness while drawing on cognitive anthropology to consider the physiological components of happiness cross-culturally.

ANT 306 Medicine and Culture

Examines how different cultures view disease and illness, how they explain illnesses, what they do about them, and how they use disease and illness as social controls. Discusses these issues in general and then as they apply to several specific cultures -- including our own.

ANT 452 Seminar: Cinema & Society in China

Chinese society in the twentieth century has experienced tumultuous change. Since the 1920s much of this change has been mirrored in the feature films produced by Chinese directors. In addition to serving as a mirror offering changing visions of Chinese society, the film industry has itself been subject to the economic and political pressures characterizing this society. This course considers such issues as changes in the family system, gender roles, ethnic identities, class relationships and the urban-rural dichotomy in modern China as these are portrayed in Chinese film. It also analyzes the distortions and interpretations in these portrayals as they reflect responses by the film industry to economic and political forces in the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

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ART AND ART HISTORY
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ARH 250 European Art: Royalty and Revolution

Overview of the major artistic movements and theories of 19th-century Europe, primarily France, Great Britain, and Germany. Movements include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, the Pre-Raphaelites, Impressionism, and Symbolism. Examines the emergence of photography. Situates the arts in their social and political contexts.

ART 232 Special Studies in Painting and Drawing

Fosters technical improvement and critical thinking among intermediate and advanced painters and drawers. Studio work, individual and group critiques, and individual research. Prerequisite: ART 221 or consent.

ART 332 Special Study: Visual Journal 2

Fosters technical improvement and critical thinking among intermediate and advanced painters and drawers. Studio work, individual and group critiques, and individual research. Prerequisite: ART 221 or consent.

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BUSINESS
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BUS 101 Business, Innovation, & Entrepreneurial Thinking

This course introduces the roles of business in society, the nature of entrepreneurship, and the application of business concepts to creating economic wealth, improving individual opportunity, raising standards of living, increasing quality of life, accepting social responsibility, promoting ecological sustainability, and realizing political stability. You will learn the interdependency of creativity, innovation, entrepreneurial thinking, new venture creation and business management.

BUS 135 Business Law & Ethics

This course introduces students to the legal and ethical environment of business.  It will assist students in identifying and analyzing ethical issues in business, while giving students practical decision-making skills.  Basic legal content such as contracts, torts, alternative dispute resolution, intellectual property, and employment law will be covered.

BUS 215 Micro & Macro Economics

This course introduces economic theory and analysis as they apply to personal, entrepreneurial, and policy-related decision-making. We will discuss economic concepts used to describe, explain, evaluate, predict, and address key social, political, & economic problems in many countries, highlighting the social impact of economic choices.

BUS 230 Financial & Managerial Accounting

This course introduces theories and methods of using accounting systems and information technology to solve problems and evaluate performance throughout the business lifecycle.  The course explores the role of accounting in providing timely and accurate information for external reporting and to support managerial planning, control, and decision making. Prerequisite: BUS 101 or HCM 200.

BUS 241 Business Analysis

This course introduces (1) the uses of information technology (MIS, Big Data) for data gathering, organization, & analysis and (2) tools such as statistics, algorithms, and analytics for interpreting data and drawing conclusions.  Areas covered include basic research design, probability, statistics, information processing, decision support, and self-directed systems. Prerequisite: BUS 101.

BUS 310 Management & Organizational Behavior

Management is the process of understanding and motivating people to perform work to achieve objectives.  Students focus on developing key competencies including responsible decision making, effective communication, leadership, broad & global perspectives, understanding human motivation, setting objectives, and analytical problem solving.  Using case studies, we will explore applications such as performance, project, crisis, and conflict management. Prerequisite: Junior status and BUS 101 or BUS 130 and 132.

BUS 317 Personal Finance

Personal Finance is the process of sourcing and using funds to achieve personal objectives. The course outlines a wide variety of financial instruments available for managing money.  Applications include: personal financial statements, insurance, social security, investments, tax, retirement, estate planning, and personal financial planning as a profession.

BUS 320 Entrepreneurial & Corporate Finance

Finance is the process of sourcing and using funds to achieve business objectives. This course introduces theories, concepts, and tools for financial planning, analysis, evaluation, and decision making in businesses, nonprofits, and social enterprises. Prerequisite: BUS 215, 230 and Junior Status.

BUS 330 Entrepreneurial Marketing

This course examines the marketing–entrepreneurship interface including opportunity recognition, taking and managing risks, innovation and value co-creation aimed at solving problems, whether for the customers in the marketplace or for people confronting complexities of social issues. Key concepts of situational-market analysis, segmentation, new product-solution development, pricing and channels of distribution and convention/digital communication strategies are integrated. Focuses on development of self, reflective practice, and skills for True Teamwork. Prerequisite: Junior status and BUS 101 or BUS 130 and 132.

BUS 350 Supply Chain Management

Operations Management is the integrated production and distribution of goods, services, and information (from acquisition of materials through production to distribution of products, services, and information).  Applications include research and development, product design, project management, supply chain management, operations planning, organizing, and control. Prerequisite: Junior status, BUS 241, and 310.

BUS 352 Project Management

Project Management involves the planning, organizing, implementing, evaluation, and utilization of resources to achieve a particular objective, according to a defined standard of quality, on a specific schedule, and within a budget.  This course develops the critical thinking skills necessary to be effective in entry level project management positions. Prerequisite: BUS 101 or BUS 130 and 132.

BUS 354 High Performance Organizations

High Performance Organizations (HPO) are identified with consistently high levels of profitability, productivity, quality, ROI, customer loyalty (& retention), and employee loyalty (& retention).  Using case studies students examine the corporate philosophies, enlightened policies, core competencies, and best practices which characterize HPOs. Prerequisite: BUS 101 and Junior status.

BUS 390A Topic: Personal Selling

Interactive classes that will focus on sales processes, sales strategies and sales skills needed to be successful in any product or service business. Classes will be enriched with the use of current examples of successful sales organization’s and sales professionals. Prerequisite: BUS 101.

BUS 400 Strategic Management

Taking a strategic approach to the challenges of managing the organization as a whole, this course examines the process of evaluating current performance, managing crises, recognizing trends and issues, creating and implementing evaluating strategies in light of organizational objectives and priorities. Based on case studies of businesses, nonprofits, and social enterprises, students will make several formal presentations focusing on situational analysis, formulation of objectives and strategies, implementation of action plans, and evaluation of results. Prerequisite: BUS 397 or HCM 397.

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CLASSICAL STUDIES
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CLS 205A Tpc: Ancient Greek Life & Language
An examination of life, language, and culture of Classical Greece.   This course introduces students to ancient Greek society and history while offering a basic knowledge of the Greek language.  After completing the course the student will have a sense of what it was like to live in Greece during the Classical Age and will be able to read easy passages in ancient Greek from the New Testament and from Classical authors such as Herodotus, Aristophanes, and Plato.  

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CRITICAL MEDIA & CULTURE STUDIES
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CMC 250D Topic: Global Peace Film Festival

In September 2015, the Global Peace Film Festival will host its festival on the Rollins campus for the tenth consecutive year. In commemoration of this momentous occasion, this course is designed as an experiential immersion opportunity in the 2015 festival. Students will receive guided instruction and hands-on learning while they participate in all aspects of pre-production, production, and postproduction of the 2015 festival in Winter Park and Orlando. The course will expose students to our community’s networks for engendering change and advancing social justice. Course is open to students from any major.

CMC 325 Incarceration & Inequality

The U.S. incarcerates more people than any other country. Class, race, nationality, and sex profoundly affect a person’s interactions with official “justice” systems, influencing who gets stopped, patted down, searched, arrested, and/or charged; who receives what kind of legal representation (if any); who is prosecuted, pressured to plead guilty, and/or convicted; who does time and how much. This course examines ways privilege and inequality manifest in, for example, the War on Drugs; the militarization of policing; prison privatization; solitary confinement; the death penalty; and extrajudicial imprisonment, torture, and killing.

CMC 350A Topic: Critical Disability Services

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of disability studies.  A critical disability studies perspective examines disability not as a medical issue, but as an issue of social and structural inequality akin to racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism.  Disability will be studied through a variety of lenses including: culture and identity, gender and sexuality, stigma, media and digital culture, critical race theory, and queer theory.  You will understand the shifting landscape of disability studies and question "normative" concepts of the body, self, and sexuality.  We will use artifacts from popular culture including documentaries, television, a comic book, and memoir to aid in our exploration and understanding of course concepts.

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COMMUNICATION
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COM 100 Intro Communication Studies

This course provides an overview of the history, practices, and key areas of research that inform the discipline of communication studies.  Students will be introduced to the applied concentrations within the major and will develop an understanding of various research methods and theories relevant to the discipline.

COM 110 Public Speaking

This course explains research, organization, writing, delivery, and critical analysis of oral presentations with attention to individual needs.

COM 220 Interpersonal Communication

This course explores communication strategies to interact more effectively in everyday, one-on-one relationships with family, friends, and co-workers.

COM 295 Research Methods in Communication

Introduces the fundamentals of communication research. Topics include the scientific method, quantitative and qualitative approaches, research ethics, hypothesis testing, measurement issues, survey design, data analysis, and more.

COM 305 Listening

The study of the art of listening and its importance in our personal and professional lives. Students learn to analyze, assess, and improve their own listening abilities.

COM 306 Intercultural Communication

Examines concepts/constructs, theories, and empirical research pertinent to communication within and between cultures, with primary focus is on contexts and relationships.

COM 312 Persuasion Theory

Explores influencing human behavior in socially acceptable ways. Looks into persuasion strategies from attitude change to audience analysis.

COM 315A Topic: High Impact Presentations

This course will expand on the public speaking skills gained through the Communication major and focus on how to create truly impactful presentations. It introduces students to a variety of presentation formats, both mediated and not mediated through technology, and emphasizes the creation of professional, impactful presentations that convey a sense of personality and trust while also being interesting and informative.

COM 315B Topic: Organizational Health

This course focuses on the organizational aspects of health communication, a frequently overlooked but increasingly important dimension of communication in the delivery of medical services. The course considers the organizations involved in medical services and their interrelationships, communication between organizations and the public on health issues, and communication within health organizations. The purpose of the course is to place patient-provider communication in the context of the organizational and institutional issues developing in health care.

COM 315C Topic: Servant-Leadership

Servant leadership is defined as a philosophy of life and leadership dedicated to the growth of others and committed to building values-driven institutions that contribute to just, caring, and sustainable societies. The concept of servant leadership is often misunderstood and discounted as a viable leadership model for the corporate world. This course is designed to introduce students to the study and application of servant leadership, including concepts and tools that allow the serving leader to empower and equip all stakeholders of the organization.

COM 325 Communication Campaigns

Introduces the planning, organizing, implementation, and evaluation of various educational, health, political, religious, and commercial campaigns. Communication campaigns are focused, large-scale efforts to exert social influence.

COM 351 Writing for Public Relations

Teaches students the basic principles of writing public relations materials for a diverse audience using diverse media. Students will practice gathering, organizing, and checking information to write a variety of PR documents.

COM 480 SR Seminar in Communication

This capstone course, taken in the senior year by students majoring in Organizational Communication or Communication Studies, provides an end-of-the-program opportunity for the advanced study of communication in multiple everyday contexts. Prerequisite: Senior status and major in Communication Studies.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE
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CMS 167 Problem Solving I: with Java

Introduction to fundamental aspects of programming, focusing on problem solving, software design concepts, and their realization as computer programs. Topics include: variables, procedural abstraction, control structures, iteration, representation of numbers, and data types. Introduction to high-level programming language to gain mastery of these principles provided in classroom activities and closed laboratory experiences. Five semester-hour course.

CMS 167L Problem Solving I Lab

Develops proficiency in using the programming principles introduced in CMS 167 and experience in incorporating those principles into working computer programs.

CMS 170 Problem Solving II: with Java

Develops discipline in program design, problem solving, debugging, and testing, with an introduction to data structures. Topics include: abstract data types, complexity analysis, and recursion. Basic data structures (queues, stacks, trees, and graphs) and transformations (sorting and searching) are introduced as representative of the fundamental tools that are used to aid in software development. A high-level programming language is used to construct programs of a moderate size. Prerequisite: CMS 167 and 167L.

CMS 230 Intro to Computer Systems

Introduction to the study of how software controls the critical hardware components of a computer's architecture – the CPU and RAM. Topics include development of C language programs, comparison of high-order procedural languages to machine language programs, CPU organization and functionality at the register/bus level, instruction formats, and development of machine language and assembly level programs using multiple addressing modes, flow-of-control branching and subroutine calls. Prerequisite: CMS 170 and MAT 140, or CMS 150.

CMS 270 Object-Oriented Design & Development

Object-oriented programming, event-driven programming, UML, unit testing, virtual machines, design patterns, exception handling, and user interfaces. Uses Java and assumes knowledge of a procedural or object-oriented language. Prerequisite: CMS 170.

CMS 380 Simulation Analysis & Design

Explores the use of probability theory and statistical methods in the development of computer simulations used to study/model real-world phenomenon. Prerequisite: CMS 270.

CMS 395A Topic: Mobile App Development

This course covers the development of mobile apps using an emulation system. Topics covered include application architectures, user interface design, graphics, location services, data persistence, web and network services and sensors. Prerequisite: CMS 270.

CMS 450 Computer Networks

Study of the technology, architecture, and software used by systems of network-connected computers. Topics include data transmission, local area network architectures, network protocols, inter-networking, distributed systems, security, and network applications such as email, WWW, and FTP. Students will develop programs that run concurrently on multiple computers. Prerequisite: CMS 330.

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DANCE
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DAN 170 Ballet I

Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Presents positions and barre exercises to build correct alignment, flexibility, strength, coordination, and ballet vocabulary.

DAN 177 Jazz I

Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Works in studio on body placement and alignment through highly-structured classical jazz warm-up (LUIGI). Values clarity and quality of movement, rhythm, style, and use of dynamics.

DAN 179 Modern I

Introduces fundamental concepts and historical background. Focuses on style, phrasing, mood projection, and changing dynamics.

DAN 277 Jazz II

Concentrates studio work on more complicated combinations, changes of direction, and initiation of pirouettes. Includes historical research, critical studies, and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: DAN 177 or consent.

DAN 279 Modern II

Builds on technique and includes history, theory, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: DAN 179 or consent.

DAN 300 Dance Composition

Introduces dance composition. Highlights personal invention, solo and group focus, and evaluative process in basic choreography. Includes readings and writings on choreographers and choreography. May be repeated for credit. Intended for dance minors. Prerequisite: DAN 394 or consent.

DAN 422 Dance Production

Assigns students to performing or technical/design role in production. Prerequisite Prerequisite: Consent.

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ECONOMICS
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ECO 108 Quantitative Methods for Economics

Certain quantitative concepts and skills are necessary for economic analysis. This course introduces these concepts and develops the applied quantitative skills needed for a more complete comprehension of economics. Demonstration of the applicability of these concepts to economic topics such as economic growth, cost-of-living, inflation, investment decision-making, and market supply and demand are illustrated.

ECO 203 Principles of Micro and Macroeconomics

Introduces mainstream theories of consumer and firm behavior. Covers utility, cost and production, market structure, and the allocation of resources. Also examines aggregate economic behavior, including determination of national income, sources of inflation and unemployment, the banking system and money supply process, fiscal and monetary policy, economic growth, and international economic issues. Suitable for nonmajors Prerequisite: ECO 202.

ECO 242 Economics, Media, Propaganda

Examines how economic rhetoric in the media is shaping popular understanding of political-economic issues and public policy. Consider the following quote: "The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists."

ECO 304 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Uses mathematical and graphic techniques to analyze behavior and relationships among broad aggregates of economic activity. Pushes beyond topics of ECO 213 to an in-depth discussion of economic policy, policy alternatives, and alternative economic models of macroeconomy. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 212 and 213.

ECO 321 Labor Economics

Highlights trends in employment, problems of unemployment, relevance of markets for labor services, and issues of wages, hours, and working conditions. Also covers labor unions, labor disputes and methods of settlement, and the theory and practice of collective bargaining. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 212 and 213.

ECO 370 Economics of Piracy

From the high seas to digital video discs (DVDs), piracy surrounds us. Piracy evolves with changing technology and legal innovations. Explores economic implications of, and rationale for, piracy in detail. Prerequisite: ECO 108, 212 & 213.

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EDUCATION
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EDU 272 Educational Psychology

Covers child development; learning, evaluation, and assessment; and psychology of teaching. Focuses on motivation, perception, personality, intelligence, and learning.

EDU 280 Diversity in American Education

Examines cultural pluralism in the classroom: multicultural education, diversity and teaching, bilingual education, racism, tracking, and teacher preparation. ESOL specific course.

EDU 310 Teaching in a 21st Century Classroom

This course offers the students a first hand study of the components of a 21st century classroom. They will learn about cutting edge techniques, software, hardware and learning styles of today's digital native.

EDU 417 Teaching (Particular Subject) in Middle and Secondary Schools

Explores selection, evaluation, and use of instructional materials to adapt a college major to middle and secondary school. Corequisite:EDU 417L. Prerequisite: Secondary certification only. Corequisite: EDU 417L.

EDU 417L Teaching (Particular Subject) in Middle and Secondary School Lab

Requires preinternship field experience of at least four hours weekly in middle and secondary school. Corequisite: EDU 417.

EDU 470 Classroom Management

The survey course, taken during the student teaching semester, helps to prepare future teachers in the planning of instruction, organization of classrooms, and the management of student learning. Not only are day-to-day items facing the teachers explored, but also the course examines topics pertaining to teaching such as child abuse, assessments, and job-hunting skills. The ETEP portfolio based on the Florida Competencies must be completed at the performance beginning teacher level. Corequisite: EDU 491.

EDU 490 Student Teaching: Elementary

Provides full-time experience integrating and applying skills in approved local school under direction of master teacher. Prerequisite: All Education major requirements.  Corequisite: EDU 470.

EDU 491 Student Teaching: Secondary

Provides full-time experience integrating and applying skills in an approved local school under direction of a master teacher. Corequisite: EDU 470.

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ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
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EED 319 Integrated Arts in the Elementary School

Provide the student with knowledge, skills, and the disposition to integrate arts into the education of elementary school children in ways that will enrich and enliven the educational experience for all. Prerequisite: Elementary Ed major or Secondary music minor.

EED 364 Science for Elementary Schools

Stresses major concepts and processes of science:process skills, inquiry strategies, problem solving, environmental and ecological issues, and science in today’s society. Prerequisite: two courses from among EDU 271, 272, 280 and 324.

EED 367 Health and Physical Education for Elementary Schools

Discusses methods for physical activities for children, concepts and materials of health education, and values underlying programs of personal fitness for children.

EED 368 Math for Elementary Teachers, Content, and Methods

Combines mathematical content and teaching methods based on NCTM Standards. Emphasizes problem solving while covering numeration, measurement, geometry, statistics and probability, and number operations. Prerequisite: Elementary Education major and one other methods course.

EED 369 Children's Literature

Survey of the genres of literature for elementary school-aged children. Emphasis on techniques used to implement literature across the elementary school curriculum. Reviews recent research, major authors and illustrators, and literature circles as means of instruction.

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ENGLISH
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ENG 140 Writing About: Selected Topics

Develops students' ability to write college-level essays by practicing strategies of argumentation and by refining skills of invention, revision, and critical thinking. Leads to writing essays characterized by unity, order, coherence, completeness, clarity, and mechanical correctness. In order to satisfy the College's general education requirement for writing (W), students must receive a grade of C or better in the course. Section topics are designated by individual instructors. This course (or an equivalent) must be taken during the first semester at Rollins. Formerly ENG 101. Does not count as elective credit in the English Major or Minor or the Writing Minor.

ENG 167 Intro to Creative Writing

Requires writing in a variety of genres including fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Emphasizes peer evaluation, thus requiring that students learn to evaluate the writing of others, as well as their own writing. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 190 Texts and Contexts

This is a theme based course introducing students to the practice of literary analysis and writing. Focusing on skills in close reading using literary and critical terminology on multiple genres. Suitable for non-majors and potential English majors.

ENG 201 Major English Writings I

Covers writers of the Medieval and Renaissance periods, including the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spencer, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonnson, and Milton from critical and historical approaches. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 206 Grammar Bootcamp

Covers basic English grammar as well as more advanced grammar to prepare students for advanced writing courses. Topics include parts of speech, sentence structure, punctuation, diction, and cohesion. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 209 Intro to Professional Writing

Offers a foundation in professional writing theory and practice. Using a rhetorical approach, analyzes situations, texts, and audiences to understand and produce effective documents. Appropriate for non-majors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 225 Practices of Effective Writing

Helps students refine writing skills by developing sound rhetorical practices and editing strategies.  In order to earn credit for this course, students must receive a grade of “C” or higher. Note: A mandatory pre-course assessment will be required. The results of this assessment may exempt some students from the need to complete the course.  Students who do not take the assessment will be required to complete the course. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 232 Literature and Experience

This genre course may focus on drama, poetry, fiction, and/or prose. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 234 EcoPoetry

Focuses on drama, poetry, fiction, and prose. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 234 20th Century British Drama

Focuses on drama, poetry, fiction, and prose. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 234 Selected Studies in Literary Themes

Focuses on drama, poetry, fiction, and prose. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 267 Topics/Techniques in Writing

The topics version of this course offers an introduction to a very specific genre of writing (fiction, autobiography, humor writing, etc.), giving close attention to the defining characteristics of the genre and offering a sequence of short reading and writing assignments designed to develop facility in producing the genre. The techniques version of this course offers a close study of a specific literary technique (point of view, character/dialogue, narrative design, voice), and requires practicing the technique in short, focused writing assignments with emphasis on both literary and technical excellence. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or consent.

ENG 273 Journalistic Writing I

This writing-intensive course is designed to introduce students to the various kinds of journalistic writing:basic news pieces, features, editorials, and reviews. It will provide them with the skills necessary to produce well written, accurate, insightful stories, and develop the skills necessary to do journalistic investigation and research. Through classroom workshops, students will also learn the basics of story editing, and the way in which generalized themes can be turned into specific, clearly defined journalistic pieces. In addition, they will become familiar with contemporary journalistic practices and issues involving ethics and standards in the media. Students in Journalistic Writing I will be encouraged to submit stories to Sandspur and join Sandspur’s staff. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 277 Writing as an Arts Critic

In this course, you will have an opportunity to experience and write reviews of works representing many artforms – from theater to film, painting to literature, music to dance to photography. You'll be challenged to find ways of expressing your personal opinions (pro and con) with clarity, imagination, style and honesty. In addition, guest speakers representing various arts will take you behind the scenes of particular productions and into the mind of the artist. The course will be taught by Jay Boyar, an award-winning arts critic who co-founded the Florida Film Critics Circle and whose work has appeared in print (Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Orlando Sentinel), on television and radio (MSNBC, E! Entertainment Television, NPR affiliates), and in books (Films to Go, Reel Romance), as well as online (BuzzFeed, Rotten Tomatoes).​ Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 300B Expository Writing: Informal Essay

This course offers students writing practice in the informal essay, a form of writing characterized by self-reflection, individual tastes and experiences, open form, and conversational manner. Early practitioners include E.B. White, Joan Didion, and John McPhee. Students will study the primary qualities demonstrated by these and other masters of the informal essay:narrative techniques, flexible structure and design, unity and order, rhetorical intent, and tone. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 300C Expository Writing: Argument

This is a course in writing formal and informal arguments. In addition to reading, analyzing, and writing various types of arguments, students discuss theories of argumentation and argumentative strategies, study logical structure and effective use of evidence in arguments; consider the role of audience and rhetorical appeals to persuade an audience. Essay assignments ask students to practice using definition, casual, resemblance, proposal, and evaluation arguments. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent. 

ENG 300H Expository Writing: Persuasive Writing

This is a course in writing formal and informal arguments. In addition to reading, analyzing, and writing various types of arguments, students discuss theories of argumentation and argumentative strategies, study logical structure and effective use of evidence in arguments; consider the role of audience and rhetorical appeals to persuade an audience. Essay assignments ask students to practice using definition, casual, resemblance, proposal, and evaluation arguments. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent. 

ENG 303 Historical Approaches to American Literature

Explores representative works from the beginnings of American literature to the present, covering the evolution of literary periodization and changes in literary form, against their historical and cultural backgrounds. Prerequisite: ENG 140 and one 200-level ENG course or consent.

ENG 304 High/Low Genre Fiction

Explores representative works of the period, focusing on the evolution of American literary consciousness and shifting literary strategies, against their historical and cultural backgrounds. Includes traditional canonical works, as well as works that expand that canon. Prerequisite: ENG 140 and a 200-level ENG course. 

ENG 317 Shakespeare

ENG 319 Victorian Modernity

Examines major writers and writings of the Modernist, Contemporary, and/or Postmodern periods. Specific writers, works, and/or genres vary. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 321 World Literature

Explores representative works of literatures other than British and American. Specific writers, works, and/or genres vary. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 344 Young Adult Fiction

Specific topics vary. Possibilities include The Postmodern; Visual Culture; Media Mixtures; Interactive Literary Venues; or some combination thereof. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 367 Creative Writing Wrkshp: Fiction

Alternates focus among various writing genres including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, screenwriting, children's literature. Requires strong, established creative writing skills and experience in writing workshops. Refer to the online Schedule of Courses for topics currently being offered. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 374 Editing Essentials

A close study of syntax, i.e., how the various components of a sentence combine to create meaning and effect. Focuses on editing for correctness (grammar, usage, punctuation, mechanics) and on editing for precision (unity, order, coherence, emphasis, diction). Prerequisite: English Majors/Minors and Writing Minors. ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 380 Language Studies

Investigates the dynamics of language from historical, sociological, and rhetorical perspectives. Students will learn the best tools for understanding language and for editing their own work and that of others. Prerequisite: ENG Major/Minor or Writing Minor. ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 444 Topics in Advanced Literature and Cultural Studies: Transhuman Romance

Offers advanced study in literature and culture with focus on critical theory. Specific topics vary. Possibilities include theories of gender and sexuality, critical race theory, postcolonialism, performance, and formal innovation.

ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing

Requires strong, established creative writing skills and experience in writing workshops. Encourages submission of selected pieces to appropriate publications. This course may be taken three (3) times for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 367 or ENG 360; or consent.

ENG 490 Advanced Major Author(s) Study: Faulkner and Morrison

Focuses on the works of a single author (excluding Shakespeare) OR a group of closely connected authors. Assigned texts include secondary sources as well as primary works. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent. JR Status.

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
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ENV 120 The Biosphere w/Lab

A survey of biological principles which include the structure and function of cells; plant and animal physiology and anatomy; development; genetics; diversity of forms; ecology; and evolution.

ENV 189 The Environmental Crisis in its Cultural Context

Weighs humanity's responsibility to nature, technocratic drift of society, and conflicts between material and environmental values. Traces development of a mechanistic worldview and re-emergence of an organic or holistic perspective.

ENV 201 Introduction to Historic Preservation

This course provides an introduction to issues of historic preservation. Topics include the history and language of the movement, governmental agencies and their activities, adaptive reuse, and architectural history. Research involving historical written sources, maps, photos, and oral history will be used in class assignments.

ENV 222 Sustainable Agriculture

The course explores the rise of local and regional food systems in North America and examines changes taking place in Central Florida.

ENV 300 Land Use Control

Law defines both property rights and the limitations placed on property use. This course analyzes how our growth can best be managed to promote the public welfare, reduce social costs and protect property rights. Florida’s Growth Management Act and its application in Central Florida will provide a major focus for the class. Emerging techniques including new urbanism, sustainable communities, transit-oriented development, and fiscal impact analysis will also be introduced.

ENV 320 Aquatic Biology: Freshwater with lab

Develops an awareness of the complex nature of the aquatic environment and the diversity of life in this medium. It starts with an exploration of the physical and chemical factors operating in the aquatic environment; then the most important groups of plants and animals are studied. Finally the individual groups are put together as populations and communities and the applied side of biology is examined through a short study of water-pollution biology. With laboratory and field trip.

ENV 389 Environmental Planning

Provides an understanding of competing demands for urban growth and development and needs to conserve and protect limited natural resources. Concludes with environmental issues in Central Florida. Prerequisite: Junior/senior status. ENV 220, and 189 or 289

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GLOBAL HEALTH
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GBH 305A Topic: Environmental Health

Introduces students to environmental health topics with a primary focus on environmental factors impacting human health, sources of these factors, methods of identification, and regulatory measures.  Topics include health hazards associated with contaminated water, food and air; vectors of disease; exposure to toxic chemicals; solid and hazardous waste; environmental justice; regulations; safety in the work place; and emerging global environmental health problems.​

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HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
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HCM 135 Healthcare Law & Ethics

This course introduces students to the legal and ethical environment of healthcare.  It will assist students in identifying and analyzing ethical issues, while giving students practical decision-making skills.  Basic legal content such as patient rights, contracts, torts, malpractice, and alternative dispute resolution will be covered. 

HCM 200 The Healthcare System

This course provides students with an understanding of the current American health care system including its history and evolution. The structure of the health care system, financing of health care, provider components, and the legal and regulatory framework within which our system operates will be addressed. The American system will be compared to health care systems globally and national issues such as public health, consumerism, access to and quality of care, health care reform, pay for performance, and managed care organizations will be discussed.

HCM 300 Health Healthcare Statistics, Technology, and Information Systems

This course introduces (1) the uses of information technology (MIS, Big Data) for data gathering in the health care context and (2) tools such as statistics, algorithms, and analytics for interpreting data and drawing conclusions. Areas covered include advanced research design, data mining, probability, statistics, information processing, decision support, self-directed systems, and an introduction to health informatics.

HCM 335 Marketing & Service Excellence

Healthcare Marketing deals with the processes of deciding what healthcare services to offer, which groups of consumers to serve, where the services should be provided, how services should be promoted to potential consumers & providers, and how prices for services should be determined. Prerequisite: HCM 200.

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HEBREW STUDIES
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HBR 101 Elementary Hebrew

Aims for basic knowledge of modern Hebrew in both oral and written forms. Assigns readings on Jewish culture and history.

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HISTORY 
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HIS 120 Decade of Decision: China in the 80s

This course focuses on the first and crucial phrase of China’s reform and opening-up that is responsible for what China is today. It explores how Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping changed the direction of China from Mao’s revolution to economic reform, how Chinese people responded and what was the legacy of Deng’ s era.

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HUMANITIES
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HUM 304 Hum: Medieval & Renaissance

The close of ancient Roman civilization corresponds to the rise of Christian culture in Western Europe. This time, which we call the beginning of the Middle Ages, saw the Christian Church, with its changing theological positions, become the sole arbiter of style, techniques, and subject in the arts and literature. This aesthetic dynasty began to diminish in the late Middle Ages until classicism and humanism re-emerged in the Western civilization during the Italian Renaissance. In this course students will investigate the development of Medieval theology and Renaissance humanism to determine how this changing relationship between mankind and its god influenced Western creativity. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

HUM 306 Humanities: Modern Period

This course will focus on the art, literature, music and philosophy of the twentieth century. We will cover early modernism, postwar existentialism, the avant-garde as well as new voices in poetic protest.

HUM 315C From Flamenco to Franco: An Introduction to Spanish Art, Ideas, and History

This course provides an introduction to the culture of Spain from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students will examine Spanish cultural artifacts – art, philosophy, literature, architecture, music, film, etc. – and situate them within their historical contexts. No knowledge of Spanish is required for this course. 

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
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IFT 107 Using PowerPoint/Graphics

Students will learn to use Microsoft PowerPoint and graphics techniques for creating effective classroom presentation. Final project:classroom presentation. Assumes knowledge of basic Windows functions including use of scroll bars, mouse and menus. (1 semester hour. CR/NC)

IFT 107OL Using PowerPt/Graphic (Online)

Online course. Students will learn to use Microsoft PowerPoint and graphics techniques for creating effective classroom presentation. Final project:classroom presentation. Assumes knowledge of basic Windows functions including use of scroll bars, mouse and menus. (1 Semester Hour. CR/NC)

IFT 110 Using Excel Spreadsheets

Students will learn how to use Microsoft Excel to solve problems that might be expected in liberal arts courses. Basic math skills required. Final project. Student cannot receive credit for both IFT 110 and Spreadsheets for Accounting. Assumes knowledge of basic Windows functions including use of scroll bars, mouse and menus. (1 semester hour. CR/NC)

IFT 112 Creating Web Home Pages

Students will learn the basic skills necessary to create Web pages, including the incorporation of computer graphics into pages. Students will create their own home pages as a final project. Assumes knowledge of basic Windows, Netscape & Rollins Novell systems. (1 semester hour. CR/NC)

IFT 113 Creating Home Web Pages II

Students will use high-level Web tools such as FrontPage, Dreamweaver and others to create advanced Web applications. Prerequisite: IFT 112 or consent.

IFT 117 Interactive Learning Tech

Explores the use of new interactive learning technologies (i.e. clickers, smartboards) in the academic setting. Focuses on pedagogically sound incorporation of these technologies into instruction. Students who complete this course will be equipped to prepare a variety of engaging presentations in all academic and professional fields. They will also be able to engage audiences in interactive learning experiences in a wide range of academic and processional areas.

IFT 120 Design with Photoshop

Students will learn to use the features of Adobe PhotoShop image-editing software to create and manipulate graphics for print and the Web. Format will be class meetings and online assignments. Students will be expected to work independently. Final project. (1 semester hour. CR/NC)

IFT 300 Digital Video I

Explores video capturing, editing and exporting through hands-on integrated use of digital cameras, VHS, CDs and DVDs. Video editing software will be used to create transitions and effects.

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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
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INAF 301 International Relations: 21st Century Challenges

This course covers contemporary international relations, including the reaction to terrorism in 2001; economic globalization and international trade; human rights and immigration issues; and concerns about climate change.

INAF 310 Terrorism: A Global Challenge

This course traces the evolution of terrorism and considers its impact on international relations and other global interactions and relationships. Formerly INAF 315F.

INAF 315F Topic: The Sovereign Individual

This multidisciplinary course will examine the convergence of technological, economic, and geopolitical factors which are changing the nature of citizenship and creating a nomadic, global class of "super-empowered" individuals.  We will examine world history from the perspective of a handful of major technological revolutions in which per capita GDP, lifeways, and the organization of society changed rapidly, and consider the skillsets and capabilities which may be necessary to thrive in the accelerating Information Economy.

INAF 315I Topic: Powers of the Asia-Pacific

This course will examine the powers of the Asia Pacific, both established and rising, with special attention to China, Japan, Russia and the United States. India, a relatively new rising power, will also be part of the discussion. The focus will be on the powers’ national interests, foreign policies, areas of cooperation, conflicts and rivalries as they affect one another, and shape the region and its future.

INAF 322 Islam, Culture & Politics

An introduction to Islam and Islamic history.  Analyses the diverse phenomena of Islamist politics in the Middle East and North Africa.  Countries explored include Egypt, Iran, Turkey, Jordan, and Algeria. Will also consider Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and Yemen.

INAF 386 Politics of South Asia

This course presents a comparative analysis of the political systems including political culture of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan. Topics include: ancient civilization; the traditions of spiritualism, tolerance of ambiguity, and ideological flexibility in contrast to Western thinking; Mahatma Gandhi's message of non-violence and public aspect of 'dharma' and 'atma'; caste system and its challenge to national integration; and the role/exploitation of religion in the politics of South Asian countries. A special emphasis will be placed on Afghanistan, Pakistan nuclear deterrents, and the war on terrorism.

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INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
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INT 100 Learning Strategies Seminar

The Learning Strategies Seminar is a one semester credit course designed to assist students with becoming responsible learners through self-management and use of academic support services. The course will address strategies for academic planning and time management, motivation, learning styles, study skills, managing stress, and other life adjustment skills. Prerequisite: Advisor Approval.

INT 200M Liberal Arts Education in US

INT 260 Foundations of Leadership

Foundations of Leadership and Citizenship introduces students to the study of leadership, social change, and service learning from both theoretical and practical perspectives. The course explores leadership in relation to individuality, group dynamics, social justice, and community engagement. Through readings, case studies, reflective journals, and group work, students examine leadership as an inclusive, relational process through which individuals, organizations, and systems can create social change. This course culminates in a portfolio demonstrating the students’ personal assessment and experiential understanding of leadership and citizenship.

INT 261 Leadership/Citizenship Action

This course builds upon a theoretical understanding of leadership, social justice, social change, and service by fostering collaboration among students in the class and with their communities through diversity and community education, community service, skills training, and facilitation opportunities. Students continue to synthesize their concepts of leadership through portfolios, reflection journals, and papers that describe their personal leadership models and gain the additional knowledge, skills, and resources to function as responsible leaders and engaged members of the Rollins College and Central Florida communities. This course culminates in a portfolio demonstrating the students' personal assessment and experiential understanding of leadership and citizenship. Prerequisite: INT 260.

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JAPANESE STUDIES
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 JPN 101 Elem Japanese I

An introduction to the Japanese language, stressing speaking, listening and writing systems. JPN 101 assumes no previous study of the language.

JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I

An intermediate-level language course which provides practice in conversation and a grammar review within the framework of the three basic skills:speaking, reading and writing. Prerequisite: JPN 102.

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MATHEMATICS 
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MAT 108 Essential Math

Basic mathematical competency course required for Rollins Plan students. Covers displaying and describing data; functions including linear, exponential and multivariable; linear regression and correlation; and basic probability. Prerequisite: high school Algebra II. 

MAT 140 Intro to Discrete Mathematics

Provides the foundation essential for sound mathematical reasoning and computer science. Topics include, but are not restricted to, propositional and predicate logic; proof strategies and induction; sets, functions, and recursion; elementary counting techniques; and number systems. Prerequisite: Math preparation sufficient to take calculus at the college level.

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MUSIC
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MUS 151 Theory I

Develops skills in notation, scales, and elementary harmony, as well as sight-singing and ear-training. Corequisite:MUA 101B or 202B Applied Music:Piano.

MUS 153 Keyboard Harmony 1

Teaches students the skills of harmonization, transposition, and sight-reading leading to the study of standard classical piano repertoire. Designed for all music majors and minors who are enrolled in MUS 151. Skill emphasis placed on scale and chord constructions, chord progressions, diatonic harmonization, transposition, alto clef, and sight reading. Prerequisite: Concurrent with MUS 151.

MUS 160 History of Jazz

Examines American popular musical styles from 1930 to the present--from musical components to musicians. Touches upon cultural, social, and historical milieu. Materials fee.

MUS 223 Singing Diction: English & Italian

Applies International Phonetic Alphabet to languages sung on lyric stage: English, Italian, Latin, Spanish, French, and German. Examines vowel and consonant formation and problems of intelligibility in different pitch ranges

MUS 227 Song Writing I

Examines the tools and methods of the songwriter, and to inspire and encourage the creation of original compositions.  Through the study of lyric structure, rhyme schemes, harmonic structure, song forms and song styles, the participants will become proficient in both the analytical and the artistic aspects of producing original works.

MUS 251 Theory III

Expands writing skills in species counterpoint in two and three voices. Includes analysis of contrapuntal forms- invention and fugue. Prerequisite: MUS 152 or consent.

MUS 286 Intro to Sound Recording

Examines the methods and technologies used to record, edit, format, manufacture and distribute music.  Students gain an understanding of how to produce their own recordings. Formerly MUS 225H. Prerequisite: MUS 152

MUS 292 Introduction to the Business of Music

An introduction to the music business including the interaction of corporations, creativity, copyright, compensation, and cyberlaw. Topics include history, MIDI, royalties, web applications, marketing, recording techniques, and common business structures.

MUS 301 Recording Practicum: Experience for the Working Musician

A versatile singer is a working singer.  Students will get real life recording experience in the studio testing their versatility and musicianship. Prerequisite: Junior status or consent.

MUS 341 Methods: Brass

Study, discussion, and analysis of methods and techniques of all instruments in the brass family; development of experimental studies for each instrument separately and together; development of playing and teaching skills. Music major/minors only.

MUS 342 Methods: Strings

Study, discussion, and analysis of methods and techniques of all instruments in the string family; development of experimental studies for each instrument separately and together; development of playing and teaching skills. Music major/minors only.

MUS 355 Practicum: Music Composition

Practicum: Composition offers students interested in more advanced study the opportunity to continue to receive instruction in composition beyond MUS 351/352 Seminar in Composition I and II. May be repeated. Prerequisite: MUS 352.

MUS 360 Music in Global Environment

An introduction to the variety of native music and instruments throughout the world, as well as  the effect of globalization on native culture, and native cultures on music throughout the world.

MUS 361 Music History I

Spans the Renaissance (1450-1600) through the Baroque (1600-1750). Prerequisite: MUS 152 or consent.

MUS 372 Survey of Jews & Music

Surveys some of the definitions of what is "Jewish" in music, from liturgical chant, to folk songs, to music of the concert hall and Tin Pan Alley. Prerequisite: Sophomore status.

MUS 380 Lit of the Instrument

Surveys major works of a particular instrument. Requires historical research, examination, and performance of scores, and extensive listening to recordings. Music majors or minors.

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PHILOSOPHY
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PHI 214 Philosophy in Literature

Investigates perennial philosophical issues in conflicts of literary characters and ideas. Considers works of Voltaire, Dostoevsky, Barth, Ellison, Camus, and Flannery O'Connor.

PHI 318 Big Companies-Little Countries

Students will study different aspects of the expanding role of multinational corporations in developing countries in the light of globalization.  Will include behavior, how values relate to practices, and the conduct of corporations.

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PSYCHOLOGY
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PSY 101 Intro to Psychology

Provides students with a broad introduction to the field of psychology including: the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, cognition, human development, intelligence, personality, psychological disorders as well as the psychology of the world of work.

PSY 211 Social Psychology

Presents a broad account of how the actual or imagined presence of others influences thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Touches upon conformity, attraction, prejudice, aggression, group decisions, and attitude change, as well as advertising, law, and indoctrination. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 261 Learning

Introduces fundamentals of behavior acquisition and modification:reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, extinction, and sequential organization. Emphasizes total competence learning, requiring students to advance beyond recognition and recall. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 301 Research Methods

Examines the major research methods used to explore important issues in psychology and organizational behavior. The process of identifying and addressing research questions will be investigated by reviewing key research strategies including field and laboratory experiments, correlational studies, and observational techniques. The course will also examine specific techniques for collecting and analyzing data and summarizing research findings. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making

This course introduces descriptive and inferential statistical procedures for the social sciences. Topics covered include scales of measurement, probability, measures of central tendency and variability, null hypothesis testing using single or multiple samples, correlation and regression, and both inferential and procedural errors individuals can make when calculating and interpreting statistics. Course must be completed as student declares psychology as a major. Individuals with insufficient mathematical preparation are encouraged to complete remedial work prior to enrolling in the course. Prerequisite: PSY 101 and high school algebra or equivalent.

PSY 306 Tests & Measurements

The theory of test construction and validation. Topics covered include intelligence testing, personality assessment, performance appraisal, skills tests, structured interviews, surveys, and other data gathering instruments. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 310 Psychopathology

Psychopathology is a clinical term related to the study and examination of abnormal behavior. This class will examine facts, theories, and treatment strategies relevant to abnormal behavior in present day society. Topics to be studied include disorders of childhood, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance related conditions, psychotic disorders, and other conditions that impair a persons functioning. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 312 Psychology and the Law

Focuses on psychological research of direct relevance to the legal system. Topics may include police interrogation and confessions, the reliability of eyewitness testimony, scientific jury selection, competency, and the insanity defense. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 315C Child Behavior and Learning Disorders

This course is designed to provide explanations and developmental frameworks for psychology, education, humanities, and communication majors who are interested in working in fields that require an understanding of childhood behavior learning profiles.  There are three goals of this course: 1) increase the identification, awareness, and understanding of a broad spectrum of disability and disorder profiles, 2) analyze adaptive vs. maladaptive behavior as it relates to community and cultural norms, and 3) review a wide variety of case studies that illustrate the continuum of psychopathology in youth. 

PSY 316 Ethics

Presents history of ethics in psychology and organizations, covering ethical codes of the American Psychological Association and the Organizational Development Institute and focusing on practical ethical dilemmas in organizations. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 330 Organizational Behavior

Surveys the field of industrial and organizational psychology as it applies to the world of work and business. The research and development methods of the field are examined. Operational applications of these methods are analyzed in terms of their use in organizations. The use of industrial-organizational psychology to aid individuals who work with others to solve human performance problems in the work environment are studied. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

PSY 336 Positive Psychology

Positive Psychology is a burgeoning area that compliments psychology's emphasis on pathology with an empirical approach to understanding human flourishing. Topics include personal strength, optimism, gratitude, and resilience. PSY 101.

PSY 343 Psychology of "We": Exploring and Enhancing Interpersonal Relationships

This experiential course explores psychological components of establishing and maintaining interpersonal relationships with emphasis on personal growth. Topics include effective self-disclosure, establishing trust, coping with anger, and managing conflict. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 413 Human Sexuality

This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to understanding all aspects of the human sexual condition. Topics include anatomy and physiology of sexual organs as well as the neural mechanism underlying ovarian and menstrual cycles and the brain testicular axis. Transmission and symptomology of sexually transmissible diseases including AIDS are also examined. The sociocultural and physiological aspects of gender and variations in sexual practice are elucidated and discussed. Finally, sexual dysfunction, its courses and the efficacy of various therapeutic options are considered. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Corequisite for psychology majors: PSY 301, 304.

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DEVELOPING READING PROFICIENCY
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RED 369 Research-based Practices in Literacy Instruction 

Teacher candidates will scaffold student learning by applying comprehensive instructional practices integrating the six components of reading. Teacher candidates will review recent research with an emphasis on techniques used to implement literature and writing experiences across the elementary school curriculum. Corequisite: RED 309.

RED 371 Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties

Covers giving and interpreting reading tests, as well as determining programs of remediation. Lab required.
 EDU Major and RED 309.

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RELIGION STUDIES
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REL 126 New Testament

An Introduction to the origins of Christianity, to the New Testament as the primary source of Christian thought and practice for nearly two millennia, and to modern critical methods in the research of the biblical text. Themes include the nature of Jesus as the Messiah, the "Kingdom of God," sin and salvation, the relationship of Christianity to Judaism, what it meant to be a Christian in the Roman empire, human interactions in the Christian community, and views about Christianity and history.

REL 300 Religion and the Body

Explores concepts and practices of the body in Eastern and Western traditions. Topics include mind/body dualism, body and gender roles, sexual norms and taboos, modesty, purity, and impurity. Prerequisite: one REL course.

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SPANISH
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SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I

Grammar, readings, cultural material, intensive oral practice, optional language laboratory. Not for native speakers or advanced students.

SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

Reading, writing, speaking, grammar review. Prerequisite: SPN 102 or equivalent.

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SEXUALITY, WOMEN'S, AND GENDER STUDIES
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SWAG 205 Introduction to Sexuality, Women's, and Gender studies

Presents feminist theory and origins of Sexuality, Women's, and Gender studies. Discusses classic texts of contemporary feminist movement. Raises consciousness about sexual stereotypes, anger, female friendships, lesbianism, mothering, violence against women, and economic power. 

SWAG 225F Topic: Living at the Intersection: Race, Gender, and Class

Every day, we embrace our differences and those of others. How we negotiate these routes is the focus of this class. Is it possible to stay on one path, or are you forced to juggle multiple identities as you move through the world? Join us for an enlightening journey.

SWAG 350 Feminist Methodology

Explores questions debated within academy. Examines feminist critique of and innovations in methodology in many fields, from the humanities to the social sciences. 

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THEATER
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THE 131 Intro to Acting (non-major)

Combines study and practice of basic rehearsal and performance techniques. Emphasizes evolution of performer’s role.

THE 206 History of Radio & Television

Surveys broadcasting from 1900 to the present:inventions, trends, programs, events, and personalities. Suitable for nonmajors.

registration dates

Students who entered Summer 2015 and have not yet met with an adviser are required to do so prior to registration. All other students are encouraged, but not required to meet with their adviser each term. You may make a telephone or office appointment by calling the Holt School Office at 407-646-2232.
Mandatory Pre-registration Check-In Opens March 17, 12:00 p.m. Check-in instructions provided in FoxLink.
Online registration begins at noon on the published first date of each registration period and ends at midnight on the last published date.  Staff support is available noon until 6:30 p.m. on the first day and 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. for the remainder of the registration period.
March 24 - Aug 24 Senior Registration: Although senior status technically begins at 100 earned hours, degree-seeking Holt students with a declared major and 90+ earned hours at the time of registration are permitted to participate in senior registration.
March 27 - Aug 24 Registration for Current Degree-seeking Students: Priority registration for degree-seeking students with a declared major and fewer than 90 earned semester hours at the time of registration. Registered seniors may add/drop during this period.
March 31 - Aug 24 Registration for Undeclared Majors: Degree-seeking students (all levels) with no declared major at the time of registration.

June 1 - Aug 24 Registration for authorized new, returning, and nondegree-seeking students: Complete applications are required for new and returning students and include the application form/fee, official transcripts from all previously attended institutions, and all documentation required for international students. New students will receive a letter with authorization to contact the Holt School Office for a registration appointment. Students completing applications after the new student registration will be contacted by a program adviser and permitted to register during the late registration period.
June1 and August 1 Administrative review and enrollment census. Low enrolled courses may be canceled at this time. No registrations accepted during the review period.
August  24, 2015 Payment Deadline: Full tuition payment must be received by the Holt School or Bursar's Office prior to 5:00 p.m. A low-cost payment plan is available. Please refer to payment instructions.
August 15 New Student Orientation
4:00 to 8:00 pm
Location: TBD

payment deadline

Payment Due:

August 24, 2015 at 5:00 p.m.

Tuition:

$445 per credit hour

  • $  890 - 2 credit hour course
  • $1,780 - 4 credit hour course
  • $2,670 - 6 credit hour course

late fee policy

Beginning fall 2015, in addition to a Bursar's hold, accounts with a past due balance will be subject to a monthly late payment fee on the following scale:

  • Past Due Balance of $200 - $999.99 - $75
  • Past Due Balance of $1,000 - $4,999.99 - $125
  • Past Due Balance of $5,000 - $19,999.99 - $200
  • Past Due Balance of $20,000 or greater - 1% of Past Due Amount

Please visit the Bursar's website for addtional information. 

 

Note: By registering, students agree to accept full responsibility for the payment of tuition and fees. If a payment is not fulfilled or returned for insufficient funds or no approval by credit, students also agree to pay all fees associated with collection of due funds, including collection costs and attorney's fees.

guide to majors and minors

The following information is to be used as a guide in selecting courses that will satisfy major or minor requirements. The requirements reflected are 2015-16 catalog requirements. Students should consult their academic advisor if they have questions. Complete details regarding course offerings can be found in the section "Schedule of Courses." Course descriptions are published in the Holt School Catalog and in this online bulletin.

Sections with a X suffix (e.g. H1X) are cross-listed with Arts & Sciences  and Collge of Professional Studies program in Education.

 


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AFRICAN & AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES (Minor)
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Electives:
ENG 140 Writing About: Travel
MUS 160 History of Jazz

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BUSINESS
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Core Courses:
BUS 101 Bus, Innov & Entrep Thinking
BUS 135 Busines Law & Ethics
BUS 215 Micro & Macro Economics
BUS 230 Financial/Managerial Acctg
BUS 241 Business Analysis
BUS 310 Management & Org Behavior
BUS 320 Entrepreneurial & Corp Finance
BUS 330 Entrepreneurial Marketing
BUS 350 Supply Chain Management
BUS 400 Strategic Management

Management Concentration:
BUS 354 High Performance Organizations

Elective Courses:
BUS 317 Personal Finance
BUS 352 Project Management
BUS 390A Topic: Personal Selling
COM 220 Interpersonal Communication
COM 306 Intercultural Communication
INT 260 Foundations of Leadership
INT 261 Leadership/Citizenship Action
PSY 330 Organizational Behavior

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COMMUNICATION STUDIES
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Core Courses:
COM 100 Intro Communication Studies
COM 110 Public Speaking
COM 220 Interpersonal Communication 
COM 295 Research Methods in Comm
COM 305 Listening
COM 306 Intercultural Communication
COM 480 SR Seminar in Communication

Public Relations Concentration Courses:
COM 325 Communication Campaigns
COM 351 Writing for Public Relations

Health Communication Concentration Courses:
COM 312 Persuasion
COM 315B Topic: Organizational Health

Organizational Communication and Leadership Concentration Courses:
COM 315C Topic: Servant-Leadership

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COMPUTER SCIENCE
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Core Courses:
CMS 167 Problem Solving I: with Java
CMS 167L Problem Solving I Lab
CMS 170 Problem Solving II: with Java
CMS 230 Intro to Computer Systems
CMS 270 Object-Oriented Design & Devel
CMS 450 Computer Networks
MAT 140 Intro to Discrete Mathematics

Elective Courses:
CMS 380 Simulation Analysis & Design
CMS 395A Topic: Mobile App Development

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DANCE (Minor)
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Core Courses:
DAN 300 Dance Composition

Elective Courses:
DAN 170 Ballet I
DAN 177 Jazz I
DAN 179 Modern I
DAN 277 Jazz II
DAN 279 Modern II
DAN 422 Dance Production

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ECONOMICS
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The Economics Major is a limited access major.  Admission to the Hamilton Holt School does not guarantee admission to the Economics Major. Admission criteria for the Economics Major is provided in the Holt School Undergraduate Catalog.  Please see your academic advisor for additional information.

Core Courses:
ECO 108 Quantitative Mthds for Econ
ECO 242 Economics, Media, Propaganda 
ECO 304 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

Elective Courses:
ECO 203 Prin Micro & Macro Economics
ECO 321 Labor Economics
ECO 370 Economics of Piracy

Note: The department recommends the following courses for students preparing for graduate programs in economics:

ECO 381 Introduction to Econometrics
ECO 403 Applied Microeconomics
ECO 411 Introduction to Mathematical Economics
MAT 111 Calculus I
MAT 112 Calculus II
MAT 211 Calculus I
MAT 140 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
MAT 219 Probability and Statistics
MAT 140 Linear Algebra

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EDUCATION
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The Hamilton Holt School and the Department of Education offer two options for students who wish to enter the teaching profession. Graduates of these state-approved Teacher Education Programs are eligible for a Florida State Teacher Certification. The Department of Education offers certification in selected secondary (6-12) subjects (Music, Social Science, and English) and Elementary Education. Please refer to the Hamilton Holt School Catalog for requirements for both programs.

Professional Education Core Courses:
EDU 272 Educational Psychology

Elective Courses:
EDU 310 Teaching 21st Cent Classroom
EED 319 Integrated Arts Elem School

Methods Courses:
RED 371 Diag of Reading Difficulties

Elementary Course Sequence:
EED 364 Science for Elem Schools
EED 367 Health & PE for Elem Schools
EED 368 Math: Content/Methods: Elem
EED 369 Children's Literature
EDU 470 Classroom Management
EDU 490 Student Teaching: Elementary

Secondary Course Sequence:
EDU 417 Teach Part Subj: Secondary
EDU 417L Tch Part Subj: Secondary Lab
EDU 470 Classroom Management
EDU 491 Student Teaching: Secondary

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ENGLISH
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Core Courses:
ENG 201 Major English Writings I
ENG 321 World Literature
ENG 303 Hist Approach to American Lit
ENG 304 High/Low Genre Fiction
ENG 374 Editing Essentials

Elective Course:
ENG 167 Intro to Creative Writing
ENG 190 Crime Fiction and Film
ENG 190 Lit of Life and Death
ENG 190 Madness and Mischief
ENG 209 Intro to Professional Writing
ENG 232 Lit & Exp: Memoir
ENG 234 20th C. British Drama
ENG 234 EcoPoetry
ENG 234 Graphic Novel
ENG 267 Writing Fiction
ENG 273 Journalistic Writing I
ENG 277 Writing as an Arts Critic
ENG 317 Shakespeare
ENG 319 Victorian Modernity
ENG 344 Young Adult Fiction
ENG 367 Creative Writing Wrkshp: Fictn
ENG 380 Language Studies
ENG 444 Transhuman Romance
ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing
ENG 490 Faulkner and Morrison

* Six electives - two at any level, three at the 300 level or higher, and one at the 400 level or higher.

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SUSTAINABLE URBANISM
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Core Courses:
ENV 120 The Biosphere w/Lab
ENV 189 Envir Crisis in Cultural Cntxt
ENV 300 Land Use Control
ENV 389 Environmental Planning

Electives:
ENV 201 Intro Historic Preservation
ENV 222 Sustainable Agriculture
ENV 320 Aquatic Biology:Freshwater

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HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Core Courses:
BUS 230 Financial/Managerial Accounting
BUS 310 Management & Organizational Behavior
HCM 135 Healthcare Law & Ethics
HCM 200 The Healthcare System
HCM 325 Human Resources in Healthcare
HCM 335 Marketing & Service Excellence

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HUMANITIES
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Core Courses:
HUM 304 Hum: Medieval & Renaissance
HUM 306 Humanities: Modern Period

History of the Expressive Arts:
ARH 250 European Art: Royalty & Revol
DAN 170 Ballet I
DAN 177/277 Jazz I & II
DAN 179/279 Modern I & II
MUS 372 Survey of Jews & Music

Literature: 
ENG 201 Major English Writings I
ENG 303 Hist Approach to American Lit
ENG 317 Shakespeare
ENG 319 Victorian Modernity
ENG 321 World Literature

History:
HIS 120 Decade of Decision:China 80's

Philosophy and Religious Studies:
PHI 214 Philosophy in Literature
PHI 318 Big Companies-Little Countries
REL 126 New Testament

Note: Individual courses may be used to satisfy one, not multiple, requirements.

Humanities Portfolio Checklist
Humanities majors/minors are required to keep a portfolio of critical essays, research papers, essay examinations, and other material from different courses that reflect each year a student has been a major.

Also, a final research project is required in connection with the last required core (HUM) course in which he/she enrolls. The student must notify the core-course instructor at the first class meeting of the student's intention to complete this requirement.

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INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
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Business and Economics:
ECO 370 Economics of Piracy
PHI 318 Big Companies-Little Countries

Foreign Cultures and Language:
ANT 205N Topic: Happiness and Culture
ANT 306 Medicine and Culture
JPN 101 Elem Japanese I
JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I
SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I 
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 

History and Politics:
INAF 301 Intern Rel: 21st Cent Challenge
INAF 310 Terrorism: A Global Challenge
INAF 315E Topic:The Sovereign Individual
INAF 315I Tpc: Powers of the Asia-Pacific
INAF 322 Islam, Culture & Politics
INAF 386 Politics of South Asia

Seminar Course:
ANT 452 Sem: Cinema & Soc in China

Note: A minimum of 15 courses must be taken, of which at least eight must be at the 300 level or above.  All IA majors who are not bilingual or polylingual must take at least one (1) language-learning class at the 200 level or above (e.g., SPN 201 or JPN 201).   The language-learning course can count toward the cultures and languages area requirement.   One of the upper-division courses must be an approved seminar.   A copy of the seminar paper is to be submitted to the IA Director before graduation.   This paper is used for evaluation of the IA Program. 

Note: Individual courses may be used to satisfy one, not multiple, requirements.

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JEWISH STUDIES (Minor)
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Elective Courses:
HBR 101 Elementary Hebrew
MUS 372 Survey of Jews & Music
REL 126 New Testament

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LEADERSHIP DISTINCTION PROGRAM (Certification)
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The Leadership Distinction Program is designed for students who want to excel beyond their degree requirements to develop their leadership potential. This program gives students extra opportunities to explore leadership development as they complete their undergraduate degrees at the Rollins College Hamilton Holt School. Students who successfully complete the leadership program and their degree requirements earn recognition of their achievements through the “Distinction in Leadership” transcript designation. 

Core Courses:
INT 260 Foundations of Leadership
INT 261 Leadership/Citizenship Action

Leadership Across the Curriculum:
BUS 310 Management & Org Behavior
COM 305 Listening  
PSY 330 Organizational Behavior

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MUSIC 
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Core Courses:
MUS 151 Theory I
MUS 153 Keyboard Harmony 1
MUS 251 Theory III
MUS 360 Music in Global Environment
MUS 361 Music History I

Elective Courses:
MUS 160 History of Jazz
MUS 223 Singing Diction: Eng & Ital
MUS 227 Song Writing I
MUS 286 Intro to Sound Recording
MUS 292 Intro to Music Business
MUS 341 Methods: Brass
MUS 342 Methods: Strings
MUS 372 Survey of Jews & Music
MUS 380 Lit of the Instrument

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ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR
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Core Courses:
PSY 101 Intro to Psychology
PSY 211 Social Psychology
PSY 301 Research Methods
PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making
PSY 306 Tests & Measurements
PSY 316 Ethics
PSY 330 Organizational Behavior
BUS 310 Management & Org Behavior

Interdisciplinary & Application Options:
COM 305 Listening 
COM 315A Tpc: High Impact Presentations
COM 315B Topic: Organizational Health
COM 315C Topic: Servant-Leadership
PSY 312 Psychology and the Law
PSY 316 Ethics

*Note: Courses used to satisfy core requirements may not also be applied toward the Interdisciplinary/Applications requirement.

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PSYCHOLOGY
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Core Courses:
PSY 101 Intro to Psychology
PSY 301 Research Methods
PSY 304 Statistics & Decision Making

Major Options:
PSY 211 Social Psychology
PSY 261 Learning and Behavior Change
PSY 306 Tests & Measurements
PSY 310 Psychopathology

Major Electives:
PSY 261 Learning and Behavior Change
PSY 312 Psychology and the Law
PSY 316 Ethics
PSY 330 Organizational Behavior
PSY 336 Positive Psychology
PSY 343 Psychology of Relationships
PSY 413 Human Sexuality

*Courses not used as Major Options can be used as Major Electives.

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SEXUALITY, WOMEN'S & GENDER STUDIES (Minor)
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Core Course:
SWAG 205 Intro Sexuality Women & Gender
SWAG 350 Feminist Methodology

Elective Courses:
SWAG 225F Topic: Race Gender & Class

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WRITING (Minor)
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Core Courses:
ENG 167 Intro to Creative Writing
ENG 367 Creative Writing Wrkshp: Fictn

Electives:
ENG 267 Writing Fiction
ENG 367 Creative Writing Wrkshp: Fictn
ENG 374 Editing Essentials
ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing

I. Creative Writing

Core Courses:
ENG 167 Intro to Creative Writing
ENG 367 Creative Writing Wrkshp: Fictn

Elective Courses:
ENG 267 Writing Fiction
ENG 367 Creative Writing Wrkshp: Fictn
ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing

II. Professional Writing

Core Courses:
ENG 209 Intro to Professional Writing

Elective Courses:
ENG 267 Writing Fiction
ENG 273 Journalistic Writing I
ENG 277 Writing as an Arts Critic
ENG 374 Editing Essentials

 

general education requirements

As preparation for active and responsible citizenship in a global society, students need both breadth and depth in their learning experience. By majoring in at least one area of knowledge, students gain the depth necessary for professional and graduate expertise, whereas the general education curriculum at Rollins College exposes students to a more varied domain of knowledge and experience.

In keeping with the College’s mission to educate students to think critically across disciplines, the general education curriculum exposes students to the ways various areas of knowledge may reinforce and enrich each other.

To be eligible for a Bachelor of Arts degree, students must complete one course from each of the general education areas listed below. Please see the catalog for a full explanation of the area requirements.

Note: The list below reflects Fall 2015 course offerings that have been approved to meet specified GERs.

Expressive Arts (A)

  • ARH 250 European Art: Royalty & Revol
  • ART 232/332 Spec Study: Visual Journal I & II
  • DAN 170 Ballet I 
  • DAN 177/277 Jazz I & II
  • DAN 179/279 Modern I & II
  • DAN 300 Dance Composition
  • DAN 422 Dance Production
  • MUS 160 History of Jazz
  • MUS 251 Theory III

Knowledge of Other Cultures (C)

  • COM 306 Intercultural Communication
  • COM 306 Intercultural Communication
  • HIS 120 Decade of Decision:China 80's
  • INAF 386 Politics of South Asia
  • MUS 360 Music in Global Environment

Knowledge of Western Cultures (H)

  • CLS 205A Topic: Ancient Greek Life & Language
  • ECO 242 Economics, Media, Propaganda
  • MUS 361 Music History I
  • MUS 372 Survey of Jews & Music
  • THE 206 History of Radio & Television

Introduction to Liberal Studies (I)

  • Introduction to Liberal Studies: Topic

Awareness of Literature (L)

  • ENG 190 Crime Fiction and Film
  • ENG 190 Madness and Mischief
  • ENG 190 Lit of Life and Death
  • ENG 201 Major English Writings I
  • ENG 232 Lit & Exp: Memoir
  • ENG 234 EcoPoetry
  • ENG 234 Graphic Novel
  • ENG 234 20th C. British Drama
  • ENG 317 Shakespeare
  • ENG 319 Victorian Modernity

Scientific Perspectives (P)

  • ENV 120 The Biosphere w/Lab
  • ENV 320 Aquatic Biology:Freshwater

Quantitative Thinking (Q)

  • CMS 380 Simulation Analysis & Design
  • ECO 108 Quantitative Methods for Economics
  • MAT 108 Essential Math

Writing Reinforcement (R)

  • ENG 300 Expository Writing: Any Topic
  • ENG 374 Editing Essentials
  • ENG 380 Language Studies

Oral Communication (T)

  • COM 110 Public Speaking
  • PSY 211 Social Psychology

Written Communication (W)

  • ENG 140 Writing About Special Topics