Chemistry at Rollins

The curricula of our two majors—chemistry and biochemistry & molecular biology—help students develop critical thinking, communication, and experimental skills to prepare them for careers in medicine, research, or industry. 

Congratulations, Rollins Chemistry Graduates!

Rollins' most recent chemistry and biochemistry & molecular biology graduates are attending medical school, studying in top chemical engineering programs, working on research toward a Ph.D. in chemistry or biomedical science, or have accepted jobs in industry.

Top-Notch Facilities

Bush Science Center, home to the Rollins College chemistry department, was extensively renovated and expanded in 2013. Students enjoy expansive teaching and research labs and high-tech classrooms.
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Faculty Who Know Their Students

Rollins chemistry students study cutting-edge chemistry with faculty who enjoy working one-on-one with them in the classroom and laboratory.
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Why Chemistry?

Did you ever wonder how two cookies that both contain the same basic ingredients can be either chewy or crunchy?  Or have you wanted to understand the reasoning and evidence for climate change? Not only is chemistry incredibly relevant to our lives, but it also addresses many questions about the nature of matter. Bronze sculptures, smartphones, and blood pressure medication exist because their developers understand chemistry. Chemistry is a discipline that affects every aspect of our lives. The study of chemistry, like all rigorous academic disciplines, requires real work, but the payoff is the acquisition of some fascinating and practical knowledge. 

What Can I Do With a Degree in Chemistry?

The Rollins chemistry department offers the American Chemical Society-certified degree program for a broad-based and rigorous chemistry education that prepares students to become effective scientific professionals and competitive applicants to jobs and graduate schools.

Get a Job! Chemists are employable in a huge variety of careers, from food science to environmental protection and pharmacology to forensics. Chemists become writers, managers, consultants, laboratory technicians...the list is long and diverse. Chemists and chemical engineers earn competitive salaries while solving problems or developing new products. Explore the American Chemical Society's website for additional information on careers for college graduates in chemistry.

Go to Medical School! Majoring in chemistry is excellent preparation for medical school. The Rollins chemistry major covers nearly all of the required science courses for medical school including math, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, general biology, and writing requirements. A strong foundation in chemistry will also be of benefit throughout medical school, most directly in problem solving/critical thinking skills and the study of topics such as drugs and metabolism.

Go to Graduate School! Do you enjoy conducting experiments in the lab? Many students choose to develop their abilities further by going to graduate school in chemistry, chemical engineering, or law. In addition to specialize in a chemical subdiscipline such as biochemistry of inorganic chemistry, median salaries for chemists greatly increase with a graduate education. A Ph.D. opens the door to careers in both industry and academics. As an added bonus, grad school will likely be paid for! Graduate students typically hold research and/or teaching assistantships, so the school waives tuition and pays the graduate student a stipend. As of 2013, the starting salary for inexperienced Ph.D. graduates is nearly double that for those who have a Bachelor's degree alone.  You can prepare yourself for graduate school by performing undergraduate research with a faculty member at Rollins or in the summer at a National Science Foundation-funded Research for Undergraduates program at one of many other schools.