Events: An Engaged Community

The Rollins chemistry department sponsors seminar speakers and special events throughout the year.

Chemistry Beyond the Classroom

Dr. Gregor assists his students in making liquid nitrogen ice cream at a student-sponsored fundraiser for children with developmental disabilities.

Seminars

Fall 2015 Seminar Series

September 18 (Friday): Dr. Jeremiah Johnson, Firmenich Career Development Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will present this year's TPJ seminar. 
Title: Using chemistry to characterize and control polymer structure across length scales
Description: Nature achieves remarkable functional diversity from macromolecules with precisely defined structures built using only a few monomers. Synthetic chemists have long sought similar control in non-natural polymeric systems. This talk will describe our efforts to develop novel chemical strategies to control polymer structure at the single molecule level (primary structure), the nano-scale, and the bulk. In particular, despite numerous recent advances towards the goal of precision polymer synthesis, there are still very few examples of non-amide- or non-phosphate-based synthetic polymers that simultaneously possess precise mass, sequence, and stereochemistry. In cases where these features are present, the requisite synthesis is not amenable to facile diversification or scale-up. Our recent development of synthetic strategies for the efficient synthesis of non-bioresemblant macromolecules with precise primary structures will be described. 
Time: TBD
Location: TBD
Talk is free and open to the public.


October 6 (Tuesday): Dr. Michael Ferracane, Postdoctoral associate, University of Florida, will present at seminar talk
Title: Design and synthesis of peptide-based opioid receptor modulators
Description:The three opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa) are g protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have long served as targets for treatment of pain and have shown promise for treatment of addiction and depression. Both exogenous (e.g. morphine) and endogenous (e.g. beta-endorphin) ligands are capable of binding and modulating this receptor family, however many opioid receptor ligands show limited therapeutic potential as a result of their lack of selectivity or poor drug-like properties. We have previously demonstrated that the unusual scaffold of the cyclic tetrapeptide CJ-15,208 has the potential to overcome these traditional hurdles. Herein, we describe docking and synthesis of CJ-15,208 analogs, with the goal of developing opioid receptor modulators that demonstrate improved selectivity and drug-like properties.
Time: TBD
Location: TBD
Talk is free and open to the public.