Student Opportunities

Student Opportunities

There is always something new happening at the Rollins College Child Development and Student Research Center (CDC).
Different research opportunities, independent studies, and internships are currently available at the CDC. We welcome students from any department to
participate and conduct research with young children and their families. Faculty sponsors are required as well as approval from the Executive Director of the CDC.

If you have an idea of a new project that you would like to bring to the CDC, please contact Diane Terorde-Doyle, Director of CDC at dterordedoyle@rollins.edu

Please find below examples of different student opportunities:

Research Opportunities:

Narrative Project

The Narrative Project is led by Dr. Alice Davidson, psychology professor at Rollins College. Dr. Davidson has been studying children’s narrative for 13 years. Rollins students work with Dr. Davidson to study the way that young children make meaning out of their personal emotional and conflict experiences through the stories they tell, as well as to examine the significance of these stories for children’s adjustment.

Please contact Dr. Davidson at adavidson@rollins.edu if you are
interested in doing research on children’s narratives. Below are several
different examples of students who have worked with Dr. Davidson.

 

 1. “Narrative Coherence in Victim and Perpetrator in Early Childhood” by” Cara Guthrie (Class of 2014) cara
  Guthrie has been conducting research in collaboration with Dr. Davidson at the CDC since spring of 2012, and will culminate her research in May 2014. Guthrie is examining the coherence of conflict narratives told by preschool children, both from the CDC and the Winter Park Day Nursery. This research has been accepted and will be presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) 2014 in Nashville, TN.  “Rollins and the CDC are uniquely positioned to provide an invaluable learning experience to both the children and the students who observe and play with them. At this point in my college career, it is hard for me to imagine the past four years without the CDC.” –Guthrie

 


2. “Type of Humor in Early Childhood” by Nicole Inclan (Class of 2013)

           

Inclan studied how children's humor relates to cognitive skills and socio-emotional skills.
Inclan observed each child's engagement in humor over the course of an hour.
She was able to find correlations between their vocabulary and socializing abilities.

 

“My experience at the CDC has taught me how to conduct research with real people.
It added a communication component and experience with community engagement to my major.” – Inclan

3. “Emotion Expression, Coherence, and Gender-Typed Activities in Preschoolers’ Narratives about
Experiences with Moms and Dads” by Julia Szenberg (Class of 2013)

 

Szenberg has been working on narrative research with Dr. Davidson since August of 2011 and is still collects data
as the Research and Public Outreach Coordinator for the CDC. As an undergraduate researcher, Szenberg presented
at the Narrative Matters Conference in Paris, France. Her thesis explored how the gendered context of an event is
related to the narrative features of that event looking at children’s stories about “a special time with mom” and
“a special time with dad.”

“The CDC helped cement everything that I learned in the classroom and the concepts I learned through my research mentor,
Dr. Davidson. Having the CDC on campus, provided me the opportunity to collect data from children who make everyday a unique
and wonderful learning experience.”-Szenberg

Independent Study Opportunities

 “Research: Early Literacy Assessment” by Sarah Pritzker (Class of 2015)

 Pritzker assessed all the 4-year-old children’s literacy skills pre and post semester using the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS). Throughout the semester she also created lesson plans, observed the children interacting, and examined how each child went about the planned activity of the day based on age and developmental level.

“Going to the CDC twice a week is my favorite part of the week. The children and teachers are so welcoming...
All of the teachers truly care about the success of the children and in helping both me and Gillian (another Rollins student)
grow as future teachers.” - Pritzker

Internship Opportunities (Career Services)

"Inclusive Practices of ABA, ECE and Inclusion of Children with Disabilities Intern“- Marie Gilbert (Class of 2016)

marieGilbert studied teaching techniques with typical children and children with disabilities using Applied Behavior Analysis and Developmentally appropriate activities to foster children's language, social and cognitive skills. Gilbert worked at the CDC and an Inclusive summer Camp program for children with Down syndrome.

Child Development Center Early Childhood Intern” - Gillian Dobbin (Class of 2016)

 Dobbin participated in daily routines and educational activities at the CDC in order to gain knowledge and experience with children in problem solving, negotiation, working with children with disabilities, and planning and organizing lessons.

 “Working at the CDC has given me the chance to work with children and implement practices that I’ve learned from my
Elementary Education major at Rollins. I’ve gained valuable experience for my future career and I’ve been able to meet
and work with great role models.” – Dobbin.

 

“I use best practices and the positive attitude that the CDC instilled in me with my middle schoolers and I have a dream of returning to the CDC community one day. Working in under resourced schools illuminates daily how important early, high quality education is to children and their future well-being.” - Wittebort

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