Psychology

Psychology


Changes effective Fall Term 2013

Carnahan Davidson Harris Houston
Luchner Queen Ray Richard
Ruiz Smither St. John Woodward

The psychology Major and Minor use the methods and content of psychological science to teach students to:

  1. understand the reasons behind their own and others' behavior
  2. become competent and critical decision makers
  3. respect human diversity and
  4. fulfill their social responsibilities.
With an emphasis on experiential learning and laboratory courses, scientific rigor, quantitative literacy, and verbal and written communication skills, the psychology major provides an excellent background for students planning to join the workforce upon graduation and for those planning to continue their education in graduate school.

Students need to consult a departmental advisor as early as possible to plan course selections. Because of the structure of the major, transfer students should expect to spend at least two (2) years in the Rollins program to complete major requirements.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Twelve (12) courses and a comprehensive exam are required.

FOUNDATIONS

  • PSY 150 Perspectives in Psychology I: The Individual in Context
  • PSY 155 Perspectives in Psychology II: Thought and Behavior

SCIENTIFIC CORE

  • PSY 250 Statistics and Research Methods I with Laboratory
  • PSY 255 Statistics and Research Methods II with Laboratory

DOMAINS IN PSYCHOLOGY

  • Seven (7) courses, one each from five domains, three of which must be laboratory courses:
    • Domain I: Behavioral Perspectives (BEH Titles)
    • Domain II: Biological Perspectives (BIO Titles)
    • Domain III: Cognitive Perspectives (COG Titles)
    • Domain IV: Developmental Perspective (DEV Titles)
    • Domain V: Individual-Social Perspectives (ISP Titles)

SENIOR CAPSTONE IN PSYCHOLOGY

  • A minimum of one (1) 400-level capstone course is taken during the senior year:
    • PSY 415 Advanced Topics in Psychology
    • PSY 491 Senior Seminar in Behavioral Psychology
    • PSY 492 Senior Seminar in Biological Psychology
    • PSY 493 Senior Seminar in Cognitive Psychology
    • PSY 494 Senior Seminar in Developmental Psych
    • PSY 495 Senior Seminar in Individual-Social Psych
    • PSY 499 Honors Research in Psychology (2 Semesters)

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT

  • Completion of a comprehensive examination during the senior year.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

Nine (9) courses are required including the two (2) Foundations courses (PSY 150 & 155), the two (2) Scientific Core courses (PSY 250 & 255) listed above, and five (5) Domains in Psychology courses, one each from five domains, three of which must be w/Lab courses:

  • Domain I: Behavioral Perspectives (BEH Titles)
  • Domain II: Biological Perspectives (BIO Titles)
  • Domain III: Cognitive Perspectives (COG Titles)
  • Domain IV: Developmental Perspective (DEV Titles)
  • Domain V: Individual-Social Perspectives (ISP Titles)

 

Course of Study


PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
: Surveys physiological, developmental, social, and personality psychology; sensation perception; learning; information processing; motivation; psychopathology; and research methods.

PSY 150 Perspectives in Psychology I: The Individual in Context: Designed for psychology majors and minors (or those considering psychology), course examines historical and current perspectives on topics in developmental, personality, and social psychology.

PSY 155 Perspectives in Psychology II: Thought and Behavior: Designed for psychology majors and minors (or those considering psychology), course examines historical and current perspectives on topics in behavioral, cognitive/physiological, and applied psychology.

PSY 190 Psychology of Adjustment and Stress Management: Helps students cope with stress, bridging gap between current research and clinical treatment. Considers assessment, treatment guidelines and techniques, effects of motivation in controlling stressors, and physiology of stress. Students experiment with stress reduction through meditation, progressive relaxation, autogenic training, hypnosis, and biofeedback. Not open to students who have taken winter intersession classes The Art and Science of Relaxation or Stress Management.

PSY 200 Stress Management: Hanging Loose in an Uptight World: Offers an approach to stress management whereby students gain a clear and in-depth understanding of its causes and effects as well as many adoptable management techniques.

PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures: Explores cultural components of several major areas in psychology, including research methods, human development, personality, social psychology, perception, and cognition. Empirical research on the interplay between individual and group beliefs and psychology forms the center of the course, which also includes guidelines to improve cross cultural relationships, and respectful research paradigms.

PSY 211 Social Psychology: Presents broad account of how actual or imagined presence of others influences thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Touches upon conformity, attraction, prejudice, aggression, group decisions, and attitude change, as well as advertising, law, and indoctrination.

PSY 213 Health Psychology: Explores the interaction between the mind and the body as it relates to health with special emphasis on the physiological consequences related to healthy and unhealthy behavior. Investigates how psychological events, such as stress and other emotions, affect physical and emotional health.

PSY 215 Topics in Psychology: Focuses on a specific topic or field in psychology which is not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit. Suitable for nonmajors.

PSY 217 Psychology of Drugs and Addictions, with Laboratory: Questions whether chemical addiction (drugs and alcohol) is disease or an attempt to adapt to inner needs and external pressures.

PSY 225 Careers in Psychology: Designed for majors wanting to know more about careers in psychology. Students will research and present information about various careers in psychology, including job responsibilities, historical and current issues associated with different fields, educational requirements, availability of positions, and salary. Emphasis placed on careers that require graduate education, so part of the class will focus on strategies and requirements for applying to graduate school. Registration priority to sophomore/junior psychology majors.

PSY 250 Statistics and Research Methods I with Laboratory: Surveys application of descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. Covers frequency distributions, transformed scores, normal-curve model, linear correlation and prediction, and hypothesis testing using variance analysis.

PSY 255 Statistics and Research Methods II with Laboratory: Details specialized lab techniques, methodology, and statistical analysis of different topical research areas. Integrates continuing lab project with discussion. Seminar. Prerequisite: PSY 250.

PSY 300 ISP: Cross Cultural Psychology: Explores the cultural components of several major areas in psychology, including research methods, human development, personality, social psychology, perception, neuropsychology, schooling, learning and memory, and cognition. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 302 BIO-COG: Brain and Language: Examines language in a biological context, and investigates the relationship between brain mechanisms and language behavior. Includes aphasia and other language disorders, hemispheric specialization, aphasia in the deaf, critical periods and aphasia in children, and gender differences in brain organization and cognitive abilities. Prerequisite: PSY 155.

PSY 305 BIO: Sleep, Dreams, and Behavior: We spend approximately a third of our lives engaged in sleep. The psychology of sleep and dreams is an important area of the discipline with implications for physiological psychology, neuroscience, personality, and clinical psychology. Lecture/discussion course in which students and instructor explore the recent scientific research on sleep and dreams and its impact on behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 155.

PSY 306 ISP: Tests and Measurements: Examines social role of tests, as well as methods of development and administration. Looks into achievement and intelligence testing, personality assessment, personnel selection, test bias, and vocational-interest testing. Prerequisites: PSY 150 and PSY 250.

PSY 309 DEV: Adolescent Development: Adolescence is characterized by rapid biological, cognitive, social, and psychological changes. Course addresses major topics in adolescent development (e.g., puberty, family, peers, sexual behavior, and romantic relationships). Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 310 ISP: Psychopathology: Deals with psychological/psychiatric disorders presented in DSM IV. Lab acquaints students with institutional settings. Emphasizes treatment procedures and vocational opportunities. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 312 ISP: Psychology and the Law: Focuses on psychological research of direct relevance to the legal system. Topics may include police interrogation and confessions, the reliability of eyewitness testimony, scientific jury selection, competency, and the insanity defense. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 313 ISP: Psychology of Religious Experience: Provides an overview of historical and modern research and theory in the psychology of religion, focusing on empirical studies and religious behaviors. Discussions center on the relationships between religious and scientific world views. Topics include the relationship between religious beliefs and practices and child rearing, mental and physical health, brain functioning, and life after death experiences. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 314 BIO-COG: Sensation and Perception: Introduces psychophysical, physiological, and cognitive aspects of human and animal perception. Includes visual, auditory, somatic, and chemical sensation; visual perception of color, objects, depth, and movement; and speech, pain, and flavor perception. Prerequisite: PSY 150, PSY 155, andPSY 255.

PSY 315 Intermediate Topics in Psychology: Focuses on a specific topic or field in psychology which is not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit.

PSY 317 ISP: Group Dynamics: Investigates group leadership, decision making, communication, conflict, creativity, team building, power relationships, and personal growth within groups. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 319 ISP: The Psychology of Work: Explores the psychological processes involved in organizational life. Drawing on current research and theory, examines issues such as employee selection, training, leadership, motivation and organizational change. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 322 COG: Cognitive Psychology with Laboratory: Introduces basic cognitive theories, methods, and research findings. Includes areas such as attention, memory, imagery, gene knowledge, language, problem-solving, and logical reasoning. Prerequisite: PSY 150, 155 and 255.

PSY 324 BIO-COG: Neuropsychology: Studies central nervous system damage and the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of brain damaged individuals. Emphasizes how the study of brain damage enhances our understanding of the intact nervous system. Prerequisites: PSY 155.

PSY 326 BIO: Physiological Psychology with Laboratory: Introduces the fundamentals of nervous system responses to psychological processes. Explores the anatomy and physiology associated with psychological events, historical and contemporary issues in the field, and the societal and personal implications regarding the use of such measures. Prerequisites: PSY 150, PSY 155, and PSY 255.

PSY 327 BIO-ISP: Evolutionary Psychology: Draws on evolutionary principles to understand human behavior, thought, and emotion, and maintains that certain psychological processes exist because they facilitated survival and reproduction during our evolutionary history. Prerequisites: PSY 150 and 155.

PSY 328 DEV: Developmental Psychology with Laboratory: Tracks human growth and change: prenatal development, cognitive development, infant attachment, personality/social development, and language acquisition. Discusses major theories of human development including cognitive-developmental, social learning, and psychoanalytic models. Requires three hours per week of hands-on participation and observation in the Child Development Center. Prerequisite: PSY 150, 155, and 255.

PSY 329 ISP: Environmental Psychology: Examines how environments (natural and built) relate to thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Topics include nature and mental health, environmental responsibility, identity display, disasters, home and work, and environment and crime. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 332 ISP: Psychology of Social Behavior: An in depth examination of research and theory in social psychology related to such topics as social influence, person perception, prejudice and discrimination, group behavior, interpersonal attraction, helping, and aggression. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 333 BIO-COG: The Mind-Body Problem. How can physical tissue -- the brain -- create subjective experiences like mood, emotion, color, and sound? Examines this fundamental question from the perspective of philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, and computer science. Prerequisites: PSY 150 and PSY 155.

PSY 338 ISP: Clinical Assessment Procedures: Presents principles of psychological testing and evaluation. Highlights referral setting, relationships among test scores, consulting outside sources, role of the clinician, interpreting test data, integrating client's history with observations, and age considerations affecting interpretation of test data. Attempts to establish elusive connection between results of psychological testing and psychotherapy. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 341 BEH: Learning with Laboratory: Introduces fundamentals of behavior acquisition and modification: reinforcement, stimulus discrimination, extinction, and sequential organization. Emphasizes total competence learning, requiring student to advance beyond recognition and recall. Prerequisite: PSY 150, 155, and 255.

PSY 342 BEH: Comparative Animal Behavior with Laboratory: Surveys the research by comparative psychologists and ethologists regarding species-specific vs. species-general behaviors. Topics include migration and other seasonal behaviors, territorial behavior, communication, aggression, defense, and reproduction-related behaviors such as mate recruitment, nesting, caring for young, and offspring socialization. Social and group behaviors, including dominance and social-synchrony, also included. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255.

PSY 345 BEH: Childhood Disorders: Surveys a wide range of childhood disorders including behavioral and emotional disorders, developmental disorders, social and health-related disorders, and adolescent problems. Also considers children at risk, and addresses child physical abuse and neglect, child sexual abuse, and substance abuse. Interdependence of biological, psychological, and developmental factors are stressed in developing an understanding of childhood disorders in the context of family, school, community, and cultural influences. Prerequisite: PSY 155.

PSY 347 Modern Psychology -- History and Systems: Chronicles development and decline of systematic positions within psychology since its establishment as a separate discipline in 19th century. Prerequisites: PSY 150 and 155.

PSY 354 ISP: Personality: Examines traditional and contemporary theories (psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, and factor analytic) about how individuals organize personal and social selves. Students apply theories to autobiographical data. Prerequisite: PSY 150.

PSY 491 Senior Seminar in Behavioral Psychology: An intensive investigation of theory, research, and practice relating to behavioral processes in psychology; requires students to apply knowledge and skills from courses across the major. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255; and senior standing.

PSY 492 Senior Seminar in Biological Psychology: An intensive investigation of issues in psychology analyzed predominantly from a biological perspective; i.e., research emphasizing physiological or evolutionary perspectives, and animal or neuropsychological models. Students will synthesize knowledge from across the major. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255; and senior standing.

PSY 493 Senior Seminar in Cognitive Psychology: An intensive investigation of theory, research, and practice relating to cognitive processes in psychology; requires students to apply knowledge and skills from courses across the major. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255; and senior standing.

PSY 494 Senior Seminar in Developmental Psychology: An intensive investigation of theory, research, and practice relating to developmental processes; requires students to apply knowledge and skills from courses across the major. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255; and senior standing.

PSY 495 Senior Seminar in Individual-Social Psychology: An intensive investigation of theory, research, and practice relating to individual and social processes in psychology; requires students to apply knowledge and skills from courses across the major. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255; and senior standing.

PSY 499 Honors Research in Psychology: Intensive independent research on a selected topic in psychology. May be repeated for credit. Two semesters required for consideration of Honors in the Major. Prerequisites: PSY 150, 155, and 255; and senior standing..