English

English


Changes effective Fall Term 2014

Aggarwal Boles Cheng Coffae
Cohen Collins Deaver Driggers
Fleming Forsythe Frost Jones
Littler Mathews Nordstrom O'Sullivan
Reich Russell Zimmermann

The Department of English curriculum offers a flexible and challenging set of opportunities that allows all students to experience a wide range of approaches to literature and writing. The goal of the curriculum is to provide a solid core of literature courses for all majors, while at the same time, providing each student the opportunity to create an individualized program that reflects his/her interests and passions. In addition to offering students a variety of choices in English, American and World Literature, the major provides a broad selection of writing courses.

 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

Students majoring in English are required to complete the following program of courses. A minimum of twelve (12) courses is required and must include six (6) core courses and six (6) electives. Majors must also submit a representative senior portfolio on or before April 23 for May graduation, October 31 for December graduation (the Friday before if the date falls on a weekend) and participate in a graduation conversation with faculty. Students majoring in English are encouraged to develop their majors in close consultation with an English Department faculty advisor.

CORE COURSES

  • ENG 201 Major English Writings I
  • ENG 202 Major English Writings II
  • ENG 221/321 Topics in World Literature
  • ENG 303 Historical Approaches to American Literature
  • ENG 304 Genre Study in American Literature
  • ENG 374 Editing Essentials OR ENG 380 Language Studies: Readers and Writers
ELECTIVES
  • Six (6) elective courses in Literature, Writing, or Film.
  • At least three (3) must be at the 300 level or higher.
  • At least one (1) must be at the 400 level or higher.

    Note: ENG 140 Composition: Writing about Selected Topics may not be used as an elective in the English major.

POLICIES FOR THE MAJOR 

 Students majoring in English may take up to two (2) approved literature electives outside the Rollins College Department of English after matriculating. (Transfer students majoring in English must take at least one-half of their English major requirements at Rollins and must have their programs approved by the Department Chair before taking additional electives outside Rollins.)

Students in both the English major and the writing minor may count only one (1) course toward both programs.

Arts and Sciences English majors must take their 400-level required English elective course at Rollins.

 

MINOR REQUIREMENTS

ENGLISH

Students seeking a minor in English take two (2) core courses and four (4) electives.

CORE COURSES
Any two (2) of the following courses:

  • ENG 201 Major English Writings I
  • ENG 202 Major English Writings II
  • ENG 221/321 Topics in World Literature
  • ENG 303 Historical Approaches to American Literature
  • ENG 304 Genre Study in American Literature

ELECTIVES

  • Four (4) elective courses in English are required
  • Two (2) courses must be taken at the 300 or 400 level

POLICIES FOR THE MINOR

 ENG 140 Composition: Writing about Selected Topics may not be used an an elective in the English minor. Students wishing to take ENG 303 Historical Approaches to American Literature or ENG 304 Genre Study in American Literature without first taking the ENG 201 and ENG 202 prerequisites for those courses must obtain the consent of the instructor.

WRITING

Students seeking personal enrichment through writing, as well as those seeking skill and versatility in professional arenas, are well served through the minor in writing. In addition to an emphasis on expressive and creative writing, the selection of courses for the writing minor offers training and practice in writing skills and discourse forms found in public, professional, and academic contexts. Students minoring in writing may choose one of two concentrations: creative writing or professional writing.

I. CREATIVE WRITING CONCENTRATION
The concentration in creative writing complements Rollins' mission of liberal education by providing a sequence of courses emphasizing the writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. For English majors and other appreciators of literature, the concentration provides a bridge between students' study of the literary canon and their understanding of the creative process that produced it. For students in any major, the literary genre-based courses of this curriculum examine the art and craft of producing good writing and, in addition, provide close study of the work of successful contemporary authors. The creative writing concentration makes use of the workshop method, giving students extensive practice in producing and critiquing texts. Among the practicing writers teaching the courses of this minor are two writers-in-residence whose published works are nationally acclaimed.

Students seeking a minor in writing with a concentration in creative writing take three (3) core courses and three (3) electives:

CORE COURSES

  • ENG 167 Introduction to Creative Writing
  • ENG 367 Creative Writing Workshop OR ENG 360 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
  • ENG 475 Creative Writing Colloquy (must be taken in the senior year)

ELECTIVES

  • ENG 209 Introduction to Professional Writing
  • ENG 210 Language and Power
  • ENG 211 Show and Tell: Visual and Verbal Text Design
  • ENG 260 Writer's Studio
  • ENG 267 Topics/Techniques in Writing
  • ENG 268 Writing Intensives
  • ENG 271 Personal Writing
  • ENG 273 Journalistic Writing I
  • ENG 276 Writing for the Future
  • ENG 277 Writing in the Community
  • ENG 295 Studies in Nonfiction Writing
  • ENG 360 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
  • ENG 361 Writing for the Professions
  • ENG 367 Creative Writing Workshop
  • ENG 373 Journalistic Writing II
  • ENG 374 Editing Essentials
  • ENG 375 The Critic's Role--Review Writing
  • ENG 380 Language Studies
  • ENG 385 Prose Style
  • ENG 392 Environmental Writing
  • ENG 396 Journal Production: SPECS
  • ENG 397 Internship in Writing
  • ENG 459 Writer's Portfolio
  • ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop
  • ENG 482 Writing for Publication
  • ENG 497 Internship in Writing

II. PROFESSIONAL WRITING CONCENTRATION

The concentration in professional writing offers courses for students interested in writing in the public arenas of civic life, the academy, and the professional world. Grounded in rhetorical theory, the courses provide humanistic, critical, and practical study of writing in specific genres, disciplines, and media. Over the last half-century technological developments have provided radical new means of communication and led to significant cultural shifts. More than ever, writers need a critical understanding of the rhetorical processes underlying communication in various media and the problem-solving skills to face continual technological and cultural change. In addition to obtaining a rhetorical understanding of communication, students will gain basic practical knowledge of how new communication technologies work and hone their writing skills through practice in specific genres and disciplines. Successful students will emerge as reflective and articulate writers able to contribute effectively to civic, academic, and professional endeavors in the twenty-first century.

Students seeking a minor in writing with a professional writing concentration take three (3) courses and three (3) electives.

CORE COURSES

  • ENG 209 Introduction to Professional Writing
  • ENG 211 Show and Tell: Visual and Verbal Text Design
  • ENG 276 Writing for the Future OR ENG 277 Writing in the Community

ELECTIVES

Two (2) of the three (3) electives must be at the 300 or 400 level.

  • ENG 210 Language and Power
  • ENG 260 Writer's Studio
  • ENG 267 Topics/Techniques in Writing
  • ENG 268 Writing Intensives
  • ENG 271 Personal Writing
  • ENG 273 Journalistic Writing I
  • ENG 276 Writing for the Future
  • ENG 277 Writing in the Community
  • ENG 295 Studies in Nonfiction Writing
  • ENG 360 Creative Nonfiction Workshop
  • ENG 361 Writing for the Professions
  • ENG 367 Creative Writing Workshop
  • ENG 373 Journalistic Writing II
  • ENG 374 Editing Essentials
  • ENG 375 The Critic's Role--Review Writing
  • ENG 380 Language Studies
  • ENG 385 Prose Style
  • ENG 392 Environmental Writing
  • ENG 396 Journal Production: SPECS
  • ENG 397 Internship in Writing
  • ENG 459 Writer's Portfolio
  • ENG 467 Adv. Creative Writing Workshop
  • ENG 475 Creative Writing Colloquy
  • ENG 482 Writing for Publication
  • ENG 497 Internship in Writing

 

Course of Study


ENG 140 Composition: Writing about Selected Topics:
Develops students' ability to write college-level essays by practicing strategies of argumentation and by refining skills of invention, completeness, clarity, and mechanical correctness. In order to satisfy the College's general education requirement for 'Writing, students must receive a grade of 'C' or better in the course. Students may take ENG 140 a second time for credit, so long as a different topic is selected. Section topics are designated by individual instructors.

ENG 167 Introduction to Creative Writing: Writing in a variety of genres including fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Focus on peer evaluation (oral and written) as well as that of the professor. Models of these genres are studied not as literature, but as writing samples.

ENG 190 Literature and Experience: Aids students in developing the means to discover and write about the ways in which literature imaginatively reflects the human condition. Each section offers a distinct focus and content. Appropriate for nonmajors and also for potential English majors.

ENG 201 Major English Writings I: Critical and historical approaches to writers of the Medieval and Renaissance periods, including the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, and Milton.

ENG 202 Major English Writings II: Critical and historical approaches to writers of the long Eighteenth Century, the Romantic period, and the Victorian Age, including Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Hopkins.

ENG 204 African Literature: Introduces major writers and literary movements of Africa.

ENG 206 Grammar Bootcamp: Covers basic English grammar as well as more advanced grammar to prepare students for advanced writing courses. Topics include parts of speech, sentence structure, punctuation, diction, and cohesion.

ENG 209 Introduction to Professional Writing: Offers a foundation in professional writing theory and practice. Using a rhetorical approach, analyzes situations, texts, and audiences to understand and produce effective documents. Appropriate for non-majors.

ENG 210 Language and Power: Surveys rhetorical tools leaders have used throughout history to change their societies. Students will analyze how these tools function within speeches, letters, essays, and other literary texts that have persuaded audiences to think, feel, and act in new -- sometimes positive, sometimes destructive -- ways. By modeling such writing in their own essays, students will practice using these tools to address contemporary social issues while discussing the ethical concerns that responsible citizens must consider whenever they use rhetoric. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 211 Show and Tell: Visual and Verbal Text Design: Investigates how visuals (pictures, graphics, color, and layout) interact with words to add or disrupt meaning in texts. Studies cutting-edge research on visual perception. Practices document design using InDesign software. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 216 Sandspur Production: Writing- and design-intensive course that supports production of The Sandspur. Covers various kinds of journalistic writing and news reporting: basic news pieces, features, editorials, and reviews. Provides skills necessary to produce and edit well-written, accurate, insightful stories, and to do journalistic investigation and research. Classroom workshops are conducted before weekly newspaper staff meetings. Familiarizes students with contemporary journalistic practices and issues involving ethics and standards in the media.

ENG 221/321 Topics in World Literature: Introduces major writers and theoretical approaches in one or more more literary traditions other than - or in combination with - British and/or American. Specific topics vary. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 229/329/429 Selected Studies in American Literature: Studies forms, traditions, themes, and genres, varying from year to year.

ENG 230 Literary Nonfiction: Allows students to sample a wide array of writing forms and strategies under the heading of "creative nonfiction." Examines the personal essay, memoir, travel writing, literary journalism, nature writing, and social criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 231 The Bible as Literature: A study of the Old and New Testaments as works of creative literature, with frequent excursions into poems, plays, and novels influenced by the Bible. Works range from black spirituals to Jesus Christ Superstar.

ENG 232 Literature and Experience: Focus may include drama, poetry, and prose. Designed for upperclass nonmajors.

ENG 233 Women Writers: Traces the literature written by women during the past several hundred years with particular interest in the 19th and 20th centuries. Examines, through various genres, the cultural climate and the authors' central thematic interests.

ENG 234 Selected Studies in Literary Themes: Focuses on drama, poetry, fiction, and prose. Suitable for nonmajors.

ENG 235 Selected Studies in Environmental Literature: A study of poets, novelists, and essayists who have spoken out strongly for the community of the land and the preservation of the environment. Typical authors: Whitman, Thoreau, Emerson, Burroughs, Muir, Austin, Abbey, Leopold, Rawlings, and Hurston.

ENG 241 Film and Literature: Studies the history and aesthetics of film and the relationship of film to literature. Material and focus will vary from year to year. Suitable for nonmajors.

ENG 242 Contemporary American Short Fiction: Covers short stories written since 1975 by key contemporary authors of short fiction. Topics may include civil rights, feminism, the legacy of Vietnam, or the mundane challenges of simply getting out of bed in the morning and going to work.

ENG 245 Selected Studies in Popular Culture: Studies the theories, forms, themes, and genres of popular culture. Compares the ways various media (e.g., fiction, film, television, radio) interpret and present similar subjects. Suitable for nonmajors.

ENG 249 Darkness Visible -- Radio Drama: Studies the almost nonexistent art of radio drama. Students are responsible for writing, directing, producing, and starring in their own weekly radio drama show on Rollins� WPRK (Tuesdays, 9:00 p.m.).

ENG 260 Writer's Studio: Students will learn about creative potential and how to nurture it. They will take up a writing "practice" that includes regular writing and attention to the conditions under which they are most creative and productive. Responding effectively to the writing of others and basic techniques of craft that good writers use to achieve effect and meaning will be explored. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 267 Topics/Techniques in Writing: "Topics" version of this course offers an introduction to a very specific genre of writing (fiction, autobiography, humor writing, etc.), giving close attention to the defining characteristics of the genre and offering a sequence of short reading and writing assignments designed to develop facility in producing the genre. "Techniques" version of this course offers a close study of a specific literary technique (point of view, character/dialogue, narrative design, voice), and requires practicing the technique in short, focused writing assignments with emphasis on both literary and technical excellence. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 268 Writing Intensives: Seven (7) intensive experiences in specific genres: memoir, short-short story, profile, sonnet, and writing about art. Each session introduces students to a particular type of writing and leads them in a series of exercises to practice writing the genre. Sessions are designed to be fun, informative, and inspirational. Instructors provide specific strategies for tackling a type of writing and for deepening and extending daily writing practice.

ENG 271 Personal Writing: Writing by self-discovery and self-expression. Explores writing as a means to discover thoughts, feelings, and intuitions, which would otherwise remain inchoate. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 273 Journalistic Writing I: Evolution of journalism and contemporary practices of news gathering and writing. Critical analyses of traditional and converging forms of journalism, the journalistic landscape, and student roles as reporters. Emphasizes journalism in the 21st century, and timeless tools essential for reporters. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 275 Selected Studies in Minority Literature: Minority literary studies. Offerings vary year to year. Suitable for nonmajors.

ENG 276 Writing for the Future: How do we depict ourselves when we�re communicating on the Internet? How does our understanding of audience shift? This course in the genre of cyberspace writing explores how our own personal reading and writing are being changed by advances in technology, as well as how online forms and practices are reshaping corporate and academic writing. Focusing on new skills we�d like to master, we�ll consider whether our ability to learn is affected by our uses of technology. Previous experience is NOT a prerequisite.

ENG 277 Writing in the Community: Explores the issues shaping communities and writing forms intended to gain voice (political, environmental, social, etc.). Through compelling service learning projects, students write responses, letters, field studies, documentaries, or other persuasive pieces to gather public support. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 278 The Beat: Writing and Reporting in the Community: Explores interests with eyes and ears of journalists, picking a beat (e.g., Politics, Environment) to generate stories, identify stories off campus of interest to report on campus. Enables students to evaluate sources, enterprise content, write in lively journalistic styles. Submissions to Sandspur encouraged. Fulfills a core course in Professional Writing Minor. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 291 Magical Realism: When a love story filters through the centuries or a man awakens as a giant cockroach (this could happen in Florida); when an owl perches on a window crying sweet warnings or a baron lives his life in the treetops; when a dead baby rises from the grave or the local shopping mall draws us into fairyland -- what are we to think? Exploring several works of magical realism, this course offers delightful metaphors, strange dreams, strategies for reading literature, and a whole new way of understanding experience. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 295/395 Studies in Nonfiction: Focus on forms, themes, and techniques of specific nonfiction prose genres (biography, environmental writing, etc.). Students study closely both peer and professional examples of the genre, learning to develop their own style and voice in practicing the form. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 300 Expository Writing: Assumes that writing is a primary way to understand, organize, and give meaning to experience, and is thus an integral part of a liberal studies curriculum. Develops writing strategies and forms that give meaningful shape to attitudes and experiences within the context of previously published ideas. Analysis of professional and anonymous student essays, as well as students' own writings. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 303 Historical Approaches to American Literature: Explores representative works from the beginnings of American literature to the present, covering the evolution of literary periodization and changes in literary form, against their historical and cultural backgrounds. Prerequisites: ENG 201, ENG 202 or consent.

ENG 304A Genre Study in American Literature: Drama: Examines drama in American literature, emphasizing the changing forms and conventions of the genre. Playwrights discussed include Treadwell, Miller, Williams, Hansberry, Shepard, Mamet, and Finley. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 304B Genre Study in American Literature: Fiction: Examines fiction in American literature, emphasizing the changing forms and conventions of the genre. Focus varies, sometimes by broad literary movement (American Renaissance, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, Postmodernism), sometimes by theme (race, gender, experimentation, the West). Prerequisites: ENG 201, ENG 202 or consent.

ENG 304C Genre Study in American Literature: Poetry: Examines poetry in American literature, emphasizing the changing forms and conventions of the genre. Focus varies, sometimes by broad literary movement (American Romanticism, Modernism, Postmodernism), sometimes by theme (race, gender, experimentation). Prerequisites: ENG 201, ENG 202 or consent.

ENG 305 American Literature I: Beginnings through 1865: Explores representative works of the period, focusing on the evolution of American literary consciousness and shifting literary strategies, against their historical and cultural backgrounds. Includes traditional canonical works, as well as works that expand that canon. Prerequisites: ENG 201, ENG 202 or consent.

ENG 306 American Literature II: 1865 to Present: Explores representative works of the period, focusing on the evolution of American literary consciousness and shifting literary strategies, against their historical and cultural backgrounds. Includes traditional canonical works, as well as works that expand that canon. Prerequisites: ENG 201, ENG 202 or consent.

ENG 307 American Literature IV: African American Literature: Explores African American literary forms from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, in the context of the social, historical, economic, and cultural politics of literary production in this specific racial community. Prerequisite: junior standing.

ENG 310/410 Studies in Anglo Saxon and Medieval Literature: Studies literature in historical context of Anglo-Saxon and Middle English periods, from 600 to 1500, in England. Emphasis on the history of the language, the cultural diversity, and the oral-formulaic nature of the poetry. Primary focus: Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

ENG 311/411 Studies in Renaissance Literature: Examines English literature of the 16th and 17th centuries, excepting Shakespeare, in the context of the times. Focus varies from term to term, sometimes by genre (prose, lyric, epic, dramatic), sometimes by theme.

ENG 312/412 Studies in Shakespeare: Studies selected poems and plays by Shakespeare, viewed in the context of Elizabethan conventions and ideas. Focus varies from term to term, sometime by genre (comedy, tragedy, history, or romance), sometimes by theme, sometimes by emphasis on lyric and narrative verse.

ENG 314/414 Topics in Restoration and 18th-Century Literature: Examines major writers and writings of the Restoration and neoclassical periods. Focus on novel as a literary genre, comic potential of the war between the sexes, and poets� efforts to offer the emerging middle class a sense of both the past and the world of ideas.

ENG 315/415 Studies in 19th-Century British Literature: Examines major writers and writings of the romantic and Victorian periods. Emphases may include works of either period, the forms of lyric poetry, the rise of the novel, or literary movements in their cultural contexts.

ENG 319/419 Studies in 20th-Century British Literature: Examines major writers and writings of the modern and contemporary periods. Emphases may include movements in poetry, fiction, or drama -- especially those that represent experiments in new modes of expression at the beginning and end of the century.

ENG 324 Selected Studies in Minority Literature: Minority literary studies. Offerings vary year to year. Suitable for nonmajors.

ENG 325 Modern Drama: Focuses on American, British, and Continental plays written/produced from 1890 to 1945. Representative playwrights include Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, Synge, O�Neill, Treadwell, Pirandello, and Eliot. Emphasizes critical analysis, historical significance, and issues of performance.

ENG 326/426 Southern Writers: Studies selected Southern writers, including novelists, dramatists, and poets. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing.

ENG 328/428 Contemporary American Literature: Studies American literature in the last half of the 20th century, from the end of World War II and the emergence of the Beats, through the tumultuous 60's and 70's, and on into the fin de siècle.

ENG 329/429 Selected Studies in American Literature: Studies forms, traditions, themes, and genres, varying from year to year. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing.

ENG 335 Critical Approaches to Literature: Focuses on major works of critical theory as well as applications of critical theory to literary texts. Includes emphasis on literary terminology. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 336/436 Twentieth-Century English and American Poetry: Seminar on British and American poets of the 20th century, with emphasis upon the major poets.

ENG 341 Film and Literature: Focuses on the history and aesthetics of film and its relationship to literature. Specific topics vary. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 342 Speculative Fiction: Specific topics vary. May focus on science fiction; fantasy; utopias/dystopias; horror and the occult; magical realism; other; a combination thereof. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 344 Literature and Cultural Studies: Specific topics vary. Possibilities include The Postmodern; Visual Culture; Media Mixtures; Interactive Literary Venues; or some combination thereof. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 345 Studies in Classical Rhetoric: The Art and Science of Persuasion: A close study of the classical tradition of rhetoric. Students will become familiar with the work of the major figures of classical rhetoric (Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, Quintilliam), their theories of rhetoric, how those theories differ and overlap, and how they have influenced modern notions of persuasiveness. Fulfills elective requirements in classical studies and communication.

ENG 360 Creative Nonfiction Workshops: Courses focus on the broad range of intellectual, rhetorical, and composition skills necessary to compose creative nonfiction prose characteristic of a single discourse form. Extensive use of a workshop approach to drafting, revising, and critiquing writing.

ENG 360A Creative Nonfiction Workshop -- Autobiography: Advanced writing course for upper-level students who wish to extend the basic intellectual, rhetorical, and composition skills necessary to compose clear and substantive prose. Studies various ways that autobiographical sketches, stories, and essays have been structured by contemporary American writers. Develops students single autobiographical text. Emphasis on a workshop approach to drafting, revising, and critiquing student writing.

ENG 360B Creative Nonfiction Workshop -- Travel Writing: Students consider the nature of travel and reflect on their journeys while trying out strategies of travel writing in this workshop course. Through conversation, campus (or central Florida) trips, and the shaping of a polished piece of travel writing, the class looks at creation of people and place. Exploring the journey as both meaning and metaphor for the lived experience of travel writers, students recall previous travels or write about their own locales. Extensive travel not expected.

ENG 360C Creative Nonfiction Workshop -- Literary Journalism: This course introduces advanced techniques of non-fiction writing in the tradition of Truman Capote, Tom Wolfe, John McPhee and Susan Orlean. Students will become familiar with applying descriptive writing techniques and developing character and plot through a variety of non-fiction writing projects, including first-person narratives and personality profiles.

ENG 361 Writing for the Professions: Enables students to make the transition from student to professional. Gives students experience in developing the writing and presentation skills expected of them in their careers. Students will learn and apply specific communication principles typical of the forms and practices of professionals. Coursework is done both independently and in groups. Appropriate for all majors. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 367 Creative Writing Workshops: Emphasis on various writing genres (fiction, creative nonfiction, etc.). Requires strong, established creative writing skills and experience in writing workshops. Prerequisite: ENG 167.

ENG 367A Creative Writing Workshop -- Poetry: Focuses on the writing of poetry through workshops run by the student participants and supervised by the professor in a conventional creative writing format. Includes some reading and discussion of contemporary poets. Prerequisite: ENG 167.

ENG 367B Creative Writing Workshop -- Children�s Writing: Workshop course in the writing of poetry or short fiction. Students will complete writing exercises, discuss structures of poems and stories, and make presentations of their original work. Prerequisite: ENG 167.

ENG 367C Creative Writing Workshop -- Fiction: Focuses on the writing of short fiction through writing workshops run by the student participants and supervised by the professor in a conventional creative writing format. Includes some reading and discussion of contemporary short story writers. Prerequisite: ENG 167.

ENG 367D Creative Writing Workshop -- Screenwriting: Through the reading of screenplays, watching of films, and multiple workshops, students write a full-length screenplay. Prerequisite: ENG 167.

ENG 370 Spiritual Autobiography: Examines the life and work of autobiographers who have fostered social activism and profound spirituality in others. In addition to oral and written projects, students explore a variety of reflective practices. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 372 Winter with the Writers: Conducted in conjunction with the visiting authors series, whose work will be the focus of study. Includes biographical research and critical studies in papers and panels in advance of writers� visits. Provides opportunity to meet these writers and discuss their work in master classes. Offers opportunity to combine an academic experience with a deeper involvement in the literary community on the campus. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 373 Journalistic Writing II: Students act as functioning journalists, researching and writing stories, dealing with sources, meeting deadlines, and working with fellow students in an editorial context. Prerequisite: ENG 273 or consent.

ENG 374 Editing Essentials: Focuses on editing writing at three levels: for correctness (grammar and punctuation); for precision (unity, order, coherence, emphasis, language); and for style (syntax, levels of detail, tone, diction, voice). Students will perform close analysis of surface features of their own and professional writing, and they will complete exercises designed to strengthen their ability to edit writing at the three levels mentioned above. This course is especially appropriate for students preparing to be teachers or engage in any profession that requires writing. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 375 The Critic�s Role -- Review Writing: Considers the role that "professional" critics play in our world -- as "reviewers" and as shapers of our culture. Students practice writing techniques that critics use when discussing art forms such as cinema, music, and literature, or such issues as economic and social policies. Strongly recommended for students considering a minor in writing or a career in writing or publishing. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 380 Language Studies: Readers and Writers: Investigates the dynamics of language from historical, sociological, and rhetorical perspectives. Students will learn the best tools for understanding language and for editing their own work and that of others. Prerequisite: ENG 140.

ENG 385 Prose Style: Writing exercises designed to increase understanding and control of fine elements of style: word choice, sentence variety, point of view, tone, rhythm, etc.

ENG390 Major Author(s): Focuses on the works of a single author (excluding Shakespeare) OR a group of closely connected authors. Assigned texts may include secondary sources as well as primary works. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 392 Environmental Writing: Fosters skills in writing argumentative essays, technical reports, book reviews, and personal essays about nature and the environment. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or consent.

ENG 395 Studies in Nonfiction: Challenges writers to experiment with various forms, themes, and genres of nonfiction prose including biography, environmental writing, food writing, etc. Suitable for nonmajors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 396 Journal Production: SPECS. Produces SPECS, a national journal of literature and culture. Includes reading, discussion, selection, and editing of material for the journal. Students review online submissions, readings on the journal theme, and participate in class discussion. Examines past issues of the journal and other national journals, discussing principles of design, content, and aesthetics. Requires final project based on the call for papers for the current issue.

ENG 397/497 Internship in Writing

ENG 412 Studies in Shakespeare: Topical course on Shakespeare's works, for advanced students. Topic to be advertised in advance of registration. Prerequisite: English major or consent.

ENG 440 Topic in World Literature: Specific topics vary. Possibilities include a theme; a period; a selection of authors. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 444 Topics in Advanced Literature and Cultural Studies. Offers advanced study in literature and culture with focus on critical theory. Specific topics vary. Possibilities include theories of gender and sexuality, critical race theory, postcolonialism, performance, and formal innovation.

ENG 459 The Writers Portfolio: Examines issues for students serious about keeping writing in their lives. Assists students in defining themselves as writers, framing their work for the public, and balancing the desire for voice with the need for professionalism. May also introduce an editing process for correctness (grammar, punctuation), precision (unity, coherence, emphasis), and style (syntax, voice, tone). Required for the minor in writing.

ENG 467 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop: Focuses on readings and writing in a chosen genre. Frequent deadlines and critiques in a workshop atmosphere emphasizing individual instruction. Revision and submission of works encouraged. May be taken three (3) times for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 367.

ENG 475 Creative Writing Colloquy: Capstone course that engages writing minors in a culminating workshop, facilitates an edited compilation of best work from the minor, and prepares them to continue writing and market their work. Prerequisite: must have completed the twenty (20) semester hours required for the creative writing minor except for this final course. By permission, a student may take this course concurrent with one other course to fulfill the minor.

ENG 482 Writing for Publication: Identifies the demands/restrictions of various publications (newspapers, magazines, literary journals, literary contests, etc.). Students conduct research on the genre, style, and audience of specific publications, write queries and proposals, and submit to at least two publications.

ENG 490 Advanced Major Author(s) Study: Focuses on the works of a single author (excluding Shakespeare) OR a group of closely connected authors. Assigned texts include secondary sources as well as primary works. Prerequisite: ENG 140 or equivalent.

ENG 498/499 Independent Study/Research