Project for Summer 2014

Population genetic structure of Central Florida native green anoles, Anolis carolinensis
Student: Callie Bateson,  Faculty sponsor: Dr. Fiona Harper

Callie started research in the Harper lab in June 2014 as part of the Student-Faculty Collaborative Research Program. Having written a thorough literature review on sea star hybridization as part of the Rollins Student-Faculty Collaborative Scholarship program, Callie spent the first two weeks of research trying to extract good DNA out of sea stars to amplify a region of the mitochondrial DNA. When this was ultimately unsuccessful due to tissue problems, we revised her entire research program to focus on the population genetic history of the native green anole, Anolis carolinensis. While the associated bench-work is essentially the same as for the sea stars, this new project entailed both of us learning how to actually catch green anoles. Hence we were frequently spotted on campus carrying fishing rods with a small noose on the end to catch the anoles found higher in the tree canopy. Although all of her training to date was as a marine biologist, Callie turned out to be a talented hunter with the patience to track and capture these swift animals.